Rogue Clone

Rogue Clone

3.9 22
by Steven L. Kent
     
 

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Lt. Wayson Harris is one of thousands of clones born and bred to be the ultimate soldiers. But unlike the others, Harris is an outlawed model—one with independent thoughts and an addiction to violence.

Presumed dead after his troops were massacred, Harris—who blames the U.A. for the slaughter—has gone AWOL as a bounty hunter. Still, it’s hard

Overview

Lt. Wayson Harris is one of thousands of clones born and bred to be the ultimate soldiers. But unlike the others, Harris is an outlawed model—one with independent thoughts and an addiction to violence.

Presumed dead after his troops were massacred, Harris—who blames the U.A. for the slaughter—has gone AWOL as a bounty hunter. Still, it’s hard for a clone to overcome his conditioning, and Harris finds himself drawn back into the U.A.'s service by his mentor and creator, Fleet Admiral Bryce Klyber.

Now, with separatists rebelling throughout the galaxy, the fate of the U.A. depends on Admiral Klyber’s plans for the Doctrinaire—the largest, most powerful battleship ever constructed. But there are those who would do anything to stop Klyber, and Harris must decide whether he should fight against them…or work for them.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781440624810
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
09/26/2006
Series:
Rogue Clone Series , #2
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
400
Sales rank:
240,369
File size:
652 KB
Age Range:
18 Years

Read an Excerpt

The fuel of violence
 
       Every clone, including me, believed he was natural-born. We grew up in orphanages, surrounded by 36,000 identical beings. Each clone believed that he was the lone natural-born on the premises. They were programmed to see themselves as having blond hair and blue eyes. When three clones shared one mirror, they all saw themselves with blond hair and blue eyes, while recognizing the brown hair and brown eyes of their comrades.
       But I did not see myself as having blond hair or blue eyes. I was a Liberator-Class clone. Other clone soldiers were built to be strong, patriotic, and ignorant of their origins. They were boy scouts and a little gland inside their brain would release a deadly hormone if they ever accepted the unnatural nature of their origin.
        I was built to be fast, ill-natured, utterly deadly, and addicted to violence. I did not have the death reflex built into my brain. Instead, I had a gland that released an addictive combination of endorphins and adrenaline into my blood to clear my head during combat…;

Meet the Author

Born in California but raised in Hawaii, novelist/video game fanatic Steven L. Kent turned a life-long joystick addiction into a 15-year gig writing for publications like MSNBC, Boy’s Life, USA Today, Chicago Tribune, and Japan Times. After publishing the 600-page The Ultimate History of Video Games, Kent satisfied his Pac-Man-angst and set his sights on fiction. Having just submitted The Clone Elite, the fourth book in his “Wayson Harris Trilogy,” Kent is currently writing a standalone sci-fi novel while he develops a new series based on the Unified Authority.

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Rogue Clone (Rogue Clone Series #2) 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 23 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It takes a good book for me to keep reading it, especially science fiction! The characters are becoming very likable and you wonder whats going to happen next.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This, the second book in the Clone Trilogy, is a nice change of pace from the usual military SciFi. This book reads more like a mystery that a SciFi. It is a great change of pace from the ordinary and a fitting sequal to the first book, Clone Republic. This book is the next step in what is shaping up to a great series. I would caution the reader, you should read the first book first, with out it nothing will makes sense. Overall, a great book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As a sequel, this book rocks. Where the first read like someone's war memoirs, this one is more of a murder mystery. It just feels like a detective story. Don't read it unless you've read the first book, but definitely pick this one up after.
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