Rogue Nation: American Unilateralism and the Failure of Good Intentions

Overview

America's democratic ideals have long been the hope of the world, but our allies increasingly see us as abandoning those ideals. It's not hard to understand why. In the months before 9/11, the United States walked away from a number of international treaties including the Kyoto Accord. After the attack, the United States turned a cold shoulder to NATO's offers to assist with the invasion of Afghanistan, unilaterally terminated the ABM treaty, and actively opposed the creation of an International Criminal Court. ...

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Rogue Nation: American Unilateralism And The Failure Of Good Intentions

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Overview

America's democratic ideals have long been the hope of the world, but our allies increasingly see us as abandoning those ideals. It's not hard to understand why. In the months before 9/11, the United States walked away from a number of international treaties including the Kyoto Accord. After the attack, the United States turned a cold shoulder to NATO's offers to assist with the invasion of Afghanistan, unilaterally terminated the ABM treaty, and actively opposed the creation of an International Criminal Court. Then came the war on Iraq, begun despite the clear refusal of the United Nations Security Council to authorize an invasion.Obsessed with our own immediate military and economic security, we now deem institutions like NATO and the UN irrelevant. We have abandoned containment for a policy of preventive attacks on potential threats. More and more, we act alone, with little regard for the needs and goals of other nations.Rogue Nation is not an argument against American dominance or the exercise of American power. It's an argument against stupidity, arrogance, and ignorance in the exercise of power. Prestowitz explores the historical roots of the unilateral impulse and shows how it now influences every important area of American foreign policy. Even now, when the need for multilateral action has never been greater, we continue to act contrary to international law, custom, and our own best interests.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780465062805
  • Publisher: Basic Books
  • Publication date: 5/10/2004
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 342
  • Product dimensions: 5.34 (w) x 8.08 (h) x 0.82 (d)

Meet the Author

Clyde Prestowitz is President of the Economic Strategy Institute in Washington, D.C., and is the author of Trading Places and Rogue Nation. He lives in Potomac, Maryland.

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Table of Contents

1 At Odds with the World--and Ourselves 1
2 The Unacknowledged Empire 19
3 America's Game 51
4 Running on Empty 81
5 Who Lost Kyoto? 111
6 In Arms We Trust 143
7 Peaceful People, Endless War 171
8 Wagging the Dog: Two Tales 193
9 Friends and Foes 227
10 City on a Hill 267
Epilogue 285
Notes 299
Recommended Reading 319
Acknowledgments 325
Index 329
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Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2006

    World┬┐s Goliath to Be Distrusted, Disliked, and Feared?

    Clyde Prestowitz is relentless in identifying and analyzing the strengths and weaknesses of the U.S. as the rest of the world perceives them. Prestowitz shows with much conviction that some Americans are not conscious enough of the gap that exists between how they see themselves and how they are perceived abroad. Nonetheless, most Americans already know that the U.S. is ultimately held to higher standards than the other countries because of its ambition to lead and inspire the world. The U.S. has been the key driver in exporting free trade, democracy, and peace, the ideas that have conquered the world following the collapse of the British Empire. The world is definitely better off thanks to what the U.S. has achieved since the 1940s. Being mighty, however, does not necessarily mean being right. Furthermore, being right is sometimes perceived as less important than the way it is conveyed. However, there is hope for starting to bridge this reality gap. Michael Mandelbaum convincingly demonstrates in The Case for Goliath that no other country than the U.S. has the ability and willingness to offer the world the governance it badly needs. The U.S. needs to better advertise and sell the global services that it provides to the community of sovereign states. These global services are most often underappreciated and taken for granted due to a lack of visibility.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 25, 2005

    Decent Critique of US Policy

    This book starts out as you would expect from the title - it's full of complaints about the current policies of the United States complete with hind-sight. Some of the stories, like one about farming subsidies and Africa make you want to gag. Where the book really shines is its ability to get into the heads of the peoples of different countries. Prestowitz does a good job of providing an outlook of America through the eyes of the Chinese, the Europeans and other nationalities. If you can read it with objectivity it is a good read. If you want a yes book for your current agenda, you might find problems.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2004

    A critigue of the 'Right' by someone on the 'Right.'

    Clyde Prestowitz is someone who has experience in negotiating foreign policy. A former Regan representative, he writes with an insiders (one could almost say 'prophetic')knowledge of the global effects of America's military and economic policies

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2004

    A must read!!

    To help the average American better understand how the world actually views us (from an unbiased perspective) this book is a must read. The book examines how the foriegn policy of not only the current administration, but of the past administrations have shaped world opinion of us. I cannot praise this book enough for it's open and honest review of our nation's dealings with the world. You will not be disappointed.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2003

    A Great Foreign Affairs Book

    I found this book to be enlightening, as well as enjoyable. It really drives home the point that sometimes the US can be aggressive and arrogant in its foreign relations. But more importantly, this book explains how and why - from the idiosynchracies of our federal system to our burden as a superpower. And though critical, it is not a kneejerk reaction to US policies, but rather a constructive prescription for change. A must-read for those interested in foreign policy.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2003

    Proud yet humble American

    Finally a book that finds a reasonable and credible middle-ground between America-bashing and American hubris! Prestowitz shows how America can be both admired for its values and respected for its leadership, rather than despised for its double-standards and feared for its bullishness.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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