Rogue States and U.S. Foreign Policy: Containment after the Cold War / Edition 1

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Overview

President Clinton and other U.S. officials have warned that "rogue states" pose a major threat to international peace in the post-Cold War era. But what exactly is a rogue state? Does the concept foster a sound approach to foreign policy, or is it, in the end, no more than a counterproductive political epithet? Robert Litwak traces the origins and development of rogue state policy and then assesses its efficacy through detailed case studies of Iraq, Iran, and North Korea. He shows that the policy is politically selective, inhibits the ability of U.S. policymakers to adapt to changed conditions, and has been rejected by the United States' major allies. Litwak concludes that by lumping and demonizing a disparate group of countries, the rogue state approach obscures understanding and distorts policymaking. In place of a generic and constricting strategy, he argues for the development of "differentiated" strategies of containment, tailored to the particular circumstances within individual states.

Woodrow Wilson Center Press

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Editorial Reviews

Political Science Quarterly
So-called rogue states are the subject of a great deal of fuzzy thinking in U.S. foreign policy decision making, and Litwak sets out to promote a more nuanced and sophisticated foreign policy strategy... In addition to the excellent analytical framework, Litwak provides three detailed case studies—Iraq, Iran, and North Korea... This book is a must read for analysts, policy makers, and students.

— James M. Goldgeier

Journal of Politics
Litwak's conclusions about the dichotomous nature of the American foreign policy debate have important implications for the conduct of American foreign policy.

— Jean A. Garrison

Virginia Quarterly Review
A thoughtful and important contribution.
Perspectives on Political Science
A careful and thorough account.

— Gordon L. Shull

Choice

A thoughtful critique of US foreign policy... well researched and structured.

Foreign Service Journal
Fortunately, this sensible book (which should be required reading for all Foreign Service personnel and U.S. policymakers) constitutes a good 'prism' in its own right for examining the flaws of current U.S. policy, and offers a better framework for the future.

— Harry C. Blaney III

Choice
A thoughtful critique of US foreign policy... well researched and structured.
Political Science Quarterly - James M. Goldgeier
So-called rogue states are the subject of a great deal of fuzzy thinking in U.S. foreign policy decision making, and Litwak sets out to promote a more nuanced and sophisticated foreign policy strategy... In addition to the excellent analytical framework, Litwak provides three detailed case studies—Iraq, Iran, and North Korea... This book is a must read for analysts, policy makers, and students.
Journal of Politics - Jean A. Garrison
Litwak's conclusions about the dichotomous nature of the American foreign policy debate have important implications for the conduct of American foreign policy.
Perspectives on Political Science - Gordon L. Shull
A careful and thorough account.
Foreign Service Journal - Harry C. Blaney III
Fortunately, this sensible book (which should be required reading for all Foreign Service personnel and U.S. policymakers) constitutes a good 'prism' in its own right for examining the flaws of current U.S. policy, and offers a better framework for the future.
Library Journal
The term rogue state has been informally applied in the post-Cold War world to those governments that are acquiring weapons of mass destruction, support terrorism abroad, or have the ability to destabilize a region in which the United States has an interest. In other contexts, it is the epithet of choice for those regimes that Washington doesn't like. Litwak, director of international studies at the Woodrow Wilson Center, clearly explains the tensions created by the multiple uses of the term and uses three case studies (Iran, Iraq, and North Korea) to demonstrate how differently the term has been applied. Each case summarizes the interactions between the United States and that state, the domestic context that affected the policy of the other party, and an analysis of the resulting U.S. policy. Litwak clearly supports his thesis that the application of such a pejorative term to another government distorts U.S. policymaking and reduces the flexibility and options available to U.S. policymakers. Academic libraries will want this.--Marcia L. Sprules, Council on Foreign Relations Lib., New York Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.\
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780943875972
  • Publisher: Woodrow Wilson Center Press
  • Publication date: 2/28/2000
  • Series: Woodrow Wilson Center Press Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 308
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.65 (d)

Meet the Author

Robert S. Litwak is director of the Division of International Studies at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. He served on the National Security Council staff as director for nonproliferation and export controls.

Woodrow Wilson Center Press

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Table of Contents

Abbreviations xi
Preface xiii
Introduction 1
Part I Policy Development
1 The Post-Cold War Context 19
2 U.S. Strategy toward Rogue States (1): Origins and Development 47
3 U.S. Strategy toward Rogue States (2): Assessment and Alternatives 74
Part II Case Studies
4 Iraq: Containing Saddam Hussein after the Gulf War 123
5 Iran: Revolutionary State or Ready to Rejoin the "Family of Nations"? 158
6 North Korea: Limited Engagement by Necessity 198
Conclusion 238
Appendix 256
Index 279
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