Roman Architecture And Society / Edition 1

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Overview

Focusing primarily on Rome and other cities of central Italy, James C. Anderson, jr., describes the training, career path, and social status of both architects and builders. He explains how the construction industry was organized—from marble and timber suppliers to bricklayers and carpenters. He examines the political, legal, and economic factors that determined what would be built, and where. And he shows how the various types of public and private Roman buildings relate to the urban space as a whole.

Drawing on ancient literary sources as well as on contemporary scholarship, Roman Architecture and Society examines the origins of the architectural achievements, construction techniques, and discoveries that have had an incalculable influence on the postclassical Western world. This detailed and concise account will appeal not only to students and scholars of Roman history, but to all with an interest in ancient architecture and urban society.

Johns Hopkins University Press

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Editorial Reviews

American Historical Review
Brings together a wealth of information important to the understanding of Roman architecture between the Republic and Constantine... Anderson's treatment is even-handed and noncommittal, a virtue for a book whose primary intention is to cover all the sources, including ancient texts, archaeological studies, and architectural histories... A timely and much-needed work of synthesis based on his extensive knowledge of the sources and using consistently sound judgement.
Religious Studies Review
Informative... Such a book, with its multitude of topics, is certain to interest a disparate audience, from art historians interested in colored marbles to gender historians interested in women in the Roman brick industry.
American Historical Review

Brings together a wealth of information important to the understanding of Roman architecture between the Republic and Constantine... Anderson's treatment is even-handed and noncommittal, a virtue for a book whose primary intention is to cover all the sources, including ancient texts, archaeological studies, and architectural histories... A timely and much-needed work of synthesis based on his extensive knowledge of the sources and using consistently sound judgement.

Religious Studies Review

Informative... Such a book, with its multitude of topics, is certain to interest a disparate audience, from art historians interested in colored marbles to gender historians interested in women in the Roman brick industry.

American Historical Review
Brings together a wealth of information important to the understanding of Roman architecture between the Republic and Constantine . . . Anderson's treatment is even-handed and noncommittal, a virtue for a book whose primary intention is to cover all the sources, including ancient texts, archaeological studies, and architectural histories . . . A timely and much-needed work of synthesis based on his extensive knowledge of the sources and using consistently sound judgement.
Religious Studies Review
Informative . . . Such a book, with its multitude of topics, is certain to interest a disparate audience, from art historians interested in colored marbles to gender historians interested in women in the Roman brick industry.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780801869815
  • Publisher: Hopkins Fulfillment Service
  • Publication date: 2/1/2002
  • Series: Ancient Society and History Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 476
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.06 (d)

Meet the Author

James C. Anderson, jr, is a professor of classics at the University of Georgia. He is the author of Roman Brick Stamps: The Thomas Ashby Collection, Historical Topography of the Imperial Fora, and numerous articles on Roman archaeology and architecture.

Johns Hopkins University Press

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Table of Contents

Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Introduction
I How the Romans Organized Building 1
1 The Roman Architects 3
2 The Organization of Building in Ancient Rome 68
3 Supplying the Roman Building Industry Manpower and Materials 119
II How the Romans Organized Space 181
4 Planning and Layout of Cities and Towns in Roman Italy 183
5 Architecture, Space, and Society in the Roman World: Public Architecture and Shared Space 241
6 Architecture, Space, and Society in the Roman World: Quotidian Architecture and Individual Space 288
Notes 337
Bibliography 403
Index 433
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