Roman Transliteration of the Holy Quran

Roman Transliteration of the Holy Quran

3.0 2
by Abdullah Yusuf Ali
     
 

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781930097537
Publisher:
Lushena Books
Publication date:
06/28/2001
Edition description:
Bilingual Edition: Arabic and English
Pages:
623
Product dimensions:
7.46(w) x 9.56(h) x 1.39(d)

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Roman Transliteration of the Holy Quran 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
050659 More than 1 year ago
IT WAS HARD TO ORDER
Guest More than 1 year ago
Paper, print quality, & binding are good price is reasonable. Yet, the 'transliteration' is not literally letter-by-letter it is more of a translation of a spoken dialect -- sort of like transliterating Southern or Midwestern American English. Example: Al-Fatiha 1:1:'Bismillaahir-Rahmaanir-Rahiim' instead of the literal 'Bismi-Allah-al Rahman-al Rahiym'. It seems that Abdullah Yosuf Ali also transliterated this work, which displays his English translation and the gorgeous calligraphy of his master calligrapher(see the Ali annotated Al Qur'an, Introduction), if I recall correctly, and Duke University published it all together in 1935 in a larger book no longer in print -- in that case his original transliteration was much more coherent and logical, and would that that exact work be put back into print! Would an expert in classical Arabic please comment on this Transliteration? This 2001 modern work is not helpful to me in learning how to pronounce written Arabic, and I advise the learner to purchase one of the good Arabic alphabet books, which show the solitary, beginning, middle, and final form of each letter -- which is not so complicated to learn, provided one is not confused by a work which provides an interpreted, affected pronunciation rather than a literal one that would logically express the classical Arabic. Perhaps Pakistani Urdu influenced the transliterators of the reviewed work? (Note, Ali was also a Northern Indian under the Raj, and yet his work is classical, and hence, universal.