Romancing Opiates: Pharmacological Lies and the Addiction Bureaucracy

Romancing Opiates: Pharmacological Lies and the Addiction Bureaucracy

5.0 2
by Theodore Dalrymple
     
 

For hundreds of years, addiction to drugs has seemed dangerous but with a hint of glamour. Addicts are a mystery to those who have never been one. They are presumed to be in touch with profound enlightenments of which non-addicts are ignorant. Theodore Dalrymple shows that doctors, psychologists, and social workers have always known these drug addictions to be

Overview


For hundreds of years, addiction to drugs has seemed dangerous but with a hint of glamour. Addicts are a mystery to those who have never been one. They are presumed to be in touch with profound enlightenments of which non-addicts are ignorant. Theodore Dalrymple shows that doctors, psychologists, and social workers have always known these drug addictions to be false! They have created these myths to build lucrative method of expensive quasi-treatment.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Kagan, currently resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, is emerging as a leading voice among national security analysts. In this important work, his focus is the post-Vietnam development of America's armed forces-not merely in policy contexts, as his book title modestly states, but also in structure and mentality. With unusual clarity and understanding, Kagan describes the individual and collective dynamics of the four armed services in the two decades after Vietnam, when the military saw a series of definable threats demanding specific responses. This period also ushered in a wider concept of military "transformation," as the nation sought a post-Soviet grand strategy and a number of senior leaders argued that the world was moving to an information age. To meet the challenge, they believed, militaries must implement a "revolution in military affairs." The balance of Kagan's work analyzes the result of this transformation: the development of technologically focused "network-centric warfare" (NCW). But with Afghanistan and Iraq standing grimly in the background, Kagan warns that, in practice, NCW reinforces the concept of war as "killing people and blowing things up" at the expense of the political objectives that separate war from murder. (Sept.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781594030871
Publisher:
Encounter Books
Publication date:
06/25/2006
Pages:
160
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.90(d)

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Romancing Opiates: Pharmacological Lies and the Addiction Bureaucracy 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The best part of Dalrymple's book is his passing on the knowledge that withdrawal from opiates is not at all as difficult as opiate users make it out to be. The very important fact for everyone in the medical field to know, as well as opiate users who want to get straight, is that people who get opiates in the hospital for pain, over an extended period of time, do not experience withdrawal the way addicts do. The actual physical withdrawal from opiates feels like a flu, that's it. There's some mental disorientation, runny nose, lethargy, fatigue--but it lasts about four days at the most. The substitution of buprenorphine or methadone is unethical and unnecessary as it replaces one addiction with another.EXCEPT for addicts who want to get their hands on their substance again. So the fact is that physically it's easy to withdraw but emotionally it's difficult for anyone who uses opiates for non-medical reasons, only because an emotional, psychological aspect is added to the withdrawal. When people who have no psychological reasons for taking opiates are taken off painkillers it is not a dramatic, agonizing experience. It's a mild flu lasting four days and then their world is back.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago