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Romantic Parodies, 1797-1831

Overview

This is the first collection of literary parodies, both poetry and prose, written during the English Romantic period. Many anthologies of literary parody have been published during the past century, but no previous selection has concentrated so intensively on a single period in English literary history, and no period in that history was more remarkable for the quantity and diversity of its parody. There was no Romantic writer untouched by parody, either as subject or as author, or even occasionally as both. Most ...
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Overview

This is the first collection of literary parodies, both poetry and prose, written during the English Romantic period. Many anthologies of literary parody have been published during the past century, but no previous selection has concentrated so intensively on a single period in English literary history, and no period in that history was more remarkable for the quantity and diversity of its parody. There was no Romantic writer untouched by parody, either as subject or as author, or even occasionally as both. Most parodies were intended to discredit the Romantics not only as poets but as individuals, and to disarm the threat they were seen as posing to establish literary and social norms. Because it focuses on the "swarm of imitative writers" about whom Robert Southey complained in an 1819 letter to Walter Savage Landor, this collection throws light on a large and often overlooked body of work whose authors had much more serious purposes than mere ridicule or amusement. Romantic parody situates itself between the eighteenth-century craft of burlesque and the nonsense verse that Victorian parody often became. This anthology demonstrates that parody is concerned with power: that it expresses ideological conflict, dramatizing clashes of ideas, styles, and values between different generations of writers, different classes and social groups, and even between writers of the same generation and class. Parody is not an inherently conservative mode; politically, it serves the whole range of opinion from extreme left to extreme right. While several of the parodies are playful - a few even affectionate - most angrily testify to the political, social, and aesthetic divisions embittering the times. Some parodies have aged more gracefully than others. But all contribute to a more vivid understanding of the era and to the reception accorded the most important Romantic writers. The venom and alarm of the response those writers provoked may surprise anyone who takes it for grante
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781611471007
  • Publisher: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press
  • Publication date: 10/1/1992
  • Pages: 409
  • Product dimensions: 6.40 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Table of Contents

Foreword: Parody and Romantic Ideology 7
Introduction 11
1 George Canning and John Hookham Frere, from The Anti-Jacobin 1797 25
2 Nehemiah Higginbottom, "Sonnets, attempted in the Manner of 'Contemporary Writers'" 1797 32
3 Robert Southey, "Inscription under an Oak" 1799 35
4 "S," "Joseph: An Attempt at Simplicity" 1799 37
5 Robert Southey, from "The Amatory Poems of Abel Shufflebottom" 1799 39
6 Anonymous, "Barham Downs; or Goody Grizzle and Her Ass" 1801 41
7 Peter Bayley, "The Fisherman's Wife" 1803 46
8 Edward Copleston, "L'Allegro, A Poem" 1807 54
9 George Manners, "The Bards of the Lake" 1809 62
10 Anonymous, "Lines originally intended to have been inserted in the last Edition of Wordsworth's Poems" 1811 68
11 Anonymous, "Review Extraordinary" 1812 70
12 James and Horace Smith, from Rejected Addresses 1812 73
13 Francis Hodgson, from Leaves of Laurel 1813 94
14 Eaton Stannard Barrett, from The Heroine, or Adventures of Cherubina 1813 101
15 Anonymous, "The Universal Believer" 1815 112
16 James Hogg, from The Poetic Mirror 1816 114
17 William Hone, from his Parodies on The Book of Common Prayer 1817 139
18 John Keats, "The Gothic Looks Solemn" 1817 147
19 Anonymous, "The Old Tolbooth" 1818 148
20 Thomas Love Peacock, from Nightmare Abbey 1818 156
21 D. M. Moir, "The Rime of the Auncient Waggonere" 1819 163
22 Anonymous, "Pleasant Walks: A Cockney Pastoral" 1819 169
23 John Hamilton Reynolds, Peter Bell 1819 173
24 D. M. Moir, "Christabel, Part Third" 1819 185
25 John Wilson Lockhart, from Benjamin the Waggoner 1819 194
26 John Hamilton Reynolds, The Dead Asses 1819 203
27 Percy Bysshe Shelley, Peter Bell The Third 1819 213
28 William Maginn, "Don Juan Unread" 1819 239
29 David Carey, "The Water Melon" 1820 242
30 William Maginn and Others, from "'Luctus' on the Death of Sir Daniel Donnelly, Late Champion of Ireland" 1820 244
31 Anonymous, "The Nose-Drop: A Physiological Ballad" 1821 249
32 William Hone, "A New Vision" 1821 256
33 Eyre Evans Crone, "Characters of Living Authors, By Themselves" 1821 261
34 Lord Byron, The Vision of Judgment 1821 268
35 Anonymous, "To the Veiled Magician" 1822 297
36 Anonymous, "Lyrical Ballad" 1822 299
37 Thomas Colley Grattan, "Confessions of an English Glutton" 1823 302
38 Caroline Bowles Southey, "Letter from a Washerwoman" and "Fragments" 1823 313
39 Catherine Maria Fanshawe, "Fragment in Imitation of Wordsworth" n.d. 325
40 William Hay Forbes, "Cockney Contributions for the First of April" 1824 327
41 William Frederick Deacon, from Warreniana 1824 338
42 Thomas Hood, "Ode to Mr. Graham," from Odes and Addresses to Great People 1825 354
43 Thomas Love Peacock, "Proemium of an Epic," from Paper Money Lyrics 1825 361
44 Hartley Coleridge, "He Lived Amidst Th' Untrodden Ways" 1827 364
45 James Hogg, "Ode to a Highland Bee" 1829 365
46 Anonymous, "A Driver of a Rattling Cab" 1831 368
Notes 370
Selected Bibliography 403
Index 408
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