Romanticism and Celebrity Culture, 1750-1850

Overview

We live in a celebrity-obsessed culture, but until recently the history of celebrity has been little discussed. The contributors to this innovative collection locate the origins of a distinctively modern kind of celebrity in the Romantic period. Celebrity was from the beginning a multi-media phenomenon whose cultural pervasiveness - in literature and the theatre, music and visual culture, fashion and boxing - overflows modern disciplinary boundaries and requires attention from scholars with different kinds of ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (8) from $32.38   
  • New (6) from $32.38   
  • Used (2) from $63.66   
Sending request ...

Overview

We live in a celebrity-obsessed culture, but until recently the history of celebrity has been little discussed. The contributors to this innovative collection locate the origins of a distinctively modern kind of celebrity in the Romantic period. Celebrity was from the beginning a multi-media phenomenon whose cultural pervasiveness - in literature and the theatre, music and visual culture, fashion and boxing - overflows modern disciplinary boundaries and requires attention from scholars with different kinds of expertise. Looking back to the 1720s and forward to the 1890s, this volume identifies the people and institutions that made the Romantic period a pivotal moment in the creation of celebrity. Tracing connections between celebrity and the period's discourses of heroism, genius, nationalism, patronage and gender, these essays map the contours of a cultural apparatus that many of the period's central figures became implicated in, even as they sought to distance themselves from it.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"...aims to demonstrate the existence not so much of individual celebrities as of a 'recognizably modern celebrity culture' before the twentieth century....The essays in this book make a convincing case for the sorrows of celebrity, as well as its alleged charms, in the prephotographic, pre-cinematic age."
-Michael Caines, TLS

"Tom Mole’s collection of essays offers a wide and intriguing range of examples of celebrity culture in the decades between 1750 and 1850 and shows to what enormous extent the Romantic age was defined and sustained by the rise of superstars and their masses of devoted adherents....Mole’s collection of well-written essays is an indispensable supplement to the numerous histories of and companions to Romanticism. Correcting our image of the Romantic period as a time of diaphanous idealism, the contributors to Mole’s book acquaint us with ‘the other Romantics’: the stars on the stages and in the boxing rings, the lions of the salons and the press and their fans elevating them like waves, leaves and clouds and letting them fall ruthlessly onto the thorns of life. And for all those who despair of the inflation of superstars in our post-modern age the book offers the consoling thought that we are closer to the Romantic age than we thought we were."
-NORBERT LENNARTZ

"This volume is clearly a valuable study of the history of celebrity, but its essays also highlight significant moments in the broader histories of print media, theatre, the public sphere, and modern subjectivity. By shining a limelight on this history of celebrity, the volume serves to show how celebrity is increasingly making its presence justifiably felt in broader literary, performance, and cultural histories."
-John Plunkett, Victoriographies

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781107407855
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication date: 10/4/2012
  • Pages: 308
  • Product dimensions: 5.98 (w) x 9.02 (h) x 0.63 (d)

Meet the Author

Tom Mole is Assistant Professor of English at McGill University.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction Tom Mole; Part I. Apparatus: 1. Celebrity and the spectacle of nation Jason Goldsmith; 2. Celebrity, politics, and the rhetoric of genius David Higgins; 3. The physiognomy of the lion: countering literary celebrity in the nineteenth century Richard Salmon; Part II. Sites: 4. Rara avis or fozy turnip: Rossini as celebrity in 1820s London Benjamin Walton; 5. Daniel Mendoza and sporting celebrity: a case study Peter Briggs; 6. Siddons rediviva: death, memory, and theatrical afterlife Heather McPherson; Part III. Gender: 7. Trials of the dandy: George Brummell's scandalous celebrity Clara Tuite; 8. Celebrity violence in the careers of Savage, Pope, and Johnson Linda Zionkowski; 9. Mary Robinson's conflicted celebrity Tom Mole; Part IV. Audience: 10. Patron or patronized?: 'fans' and the eighteenth-century English stage Cheryl Wanko; 11. Byron, commonplacing and early fan culture Corin Throsby; 12. Ann Hatton's celebrity pursuits Judith Pascoe; Bibliography; Index.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)