Romanticism at the End of History

Romanticism at the End of History

by Jerome Christensen
     
 

The Romantics lived through a turn of the century that, like our own, seemed to mark an end to history as it had long been understood. They faced accelerated change, including unprecedented state power, armies capable of mass destruction, a polyglot imperial system, and a market economy driven by speculation. In Romanticism at the End of History, Jerome

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Overview

The Romantics lived through a turn of the century that, like our own, seemed to mark an end to history as it had long been understood. They faced accelerated change, including unprecedented state power, armies capable of mass destruction, a polyglot imperial system, and a market economy driven by speculation. In Romanticism at the End of History, Jerome Christensen challenges the prevailing belief that the Romantics were reluctant to respond to social injustice. Through provocative and searching readings of the poetry of Wordsworth; the poems, criticism, and journalism of Coleridge; the Confessions of De Quincey; and Sir Walter Scott's Waverley, Christensen concludes that during complicated times of war and revolution English Romantic writers were forced to redefine their role as artists.

Johns Hopkins University Press

Editorial Reviews

Rocky Mountain Review

Romanticism at the End of History provides a refreshingly new discussion of Romanticism that focuses on the use of Romantic texts and Romantic ideas instead of on their critique... His fresh take on the 'color of imagination' provides new insights into the connection between the lives and works of Wordsworth and Coleridge.

— Kandi Tayebi

This Year's Work in English Studies

[Christensen's] formulation of the Romantics is fascinating, bound up with the future of poetry as well as the way in which we should think about their historical significance. This element of the study is tied to Christensen's stirring concern with the uses to which Romantic texts and Romantic thinking can be put in the twenty-first-century university environment.

European Romantic Review

Romanticism at the End of History is a book of remarkable wit, verve, and imagination... Frequently spellbinding and often wonderfully suggestive.

— Hugh Roberts

Modern Language Review

How, asks Christensen, can one resist commercialist hegemony in the posthistorical world?... This book bravely and passionately asserts the contemporary relevance of the utopian impulse in 'Romantic' writing without falling prey to its ideological posturing.

— Michael John Kooy

British Association for Romantic Studies Bulletin and Review

Jerome Christensen, sometime pupil of M. H. Abrams but assiduously conversant in all serious emergent critical idioms, has written a brilliant book as timely and intellectually demanding as one would expect.

— Paul Hamilton

European Romantic Review - Hugh Roberts

Romanticism at the End of History is a book of remarkable wit, verve, and imagination... Frequently spellbinding and often wonderfully suggestive.

British Association for Romantic Studies Bulletin and Review - Paul Hamilton

Jerome Christensen, sometime pupil of M. H. Abrams but assiduously conversant in all serious emergent critical idioms, has written a brilliant book as timely and intellectually demanding as one would expect.

Modern Language Review - Michael John Kooy

How, asks Christensen, can one resist commercialist hegemony in the posthistorical world?... This book bravely and passionately asserts the contemporary relevance of the utopian impulse in 'Romantic' writing without falling prey to its ideological posturing.

Rocky Mountain Review - Kandi Tayebi

Romanticism at the End of History provides a refreshingly new discussion of Romanticism that focuses on the use of Romantic texts and Romantic ideas instead of on their critique... His fresh take on the 'color of imagination' provides new insights into the connection between the lives and works of Wordsworth and Coleridge.

Booknews
The Romantics lived through a turn of the century that seemed to mark an end to history as it had been understood. This study reconsiders how English Romantic writers defined their relationship to radical social and political changes. In a revisionary account of the way first-generation Romantics responded to the crisis of revolution and war, the author identifies the emergence of an anthropological imagination that conceived of poetry as the notation of differences that escaped the impasse of England versus France. The author teaches English at Vanderbilt University. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780801879036
Publisher:
Johns Hopkins University Press
Publication date:
12/15/2003
Pages:
256
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.54(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are saying about this

Frank McConnell
The most brilliant, comprehensive, and humanizing discussion of Romanticism I've encountered in a long time: criticism that unabashedly loves its subject.
—Frank McConnell, University of California, Santa Barbara

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