Rome Across Time and Space: Cultural Transmission and the Exchange of Ideas, c.500-1400

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Overview

Medieval Rome was uniquely important, both as a physical city and as an idea with immense cultural capital, encapsulating the legacy of the ancient Empire, the glorious world of the martyrs and the triumph of Christian faith. Rome Across Time and Space explores these twin dimensions of 'place' and 'idea' and analyses Rome's role in the transmission of culture throughout the Middle Ages. Ranging widely over liturgy, architecture, sculpture and textual history, the authors focus on the mutual enrichment derived from the exchange of ideas and illuminate how cultural exchanges between Rome and its 'neighbours' (Byzantium, Italy, England and France), and within Rome (between Ancient and early Christian Rome and the medieval city) worked as catalysts for change, both to shape the medieval city and to help construct the medieval idea of Rome itself. The result is a rich and original perspective on a beguiling city with enduring appeal.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"With its clearly defined questions, and its innovative papers [Rome across Time and Space] proves to be an extremely useful compass that will help you navigate whether you are going towards or coming from Rome... it diversifies and refreshes our understanding of the idea(s) of Rome prevailing in the Middle Ages...a volume worthwhile reading both for its individual papers and for the overarching concept." Réka Forrai, Bryn Mawr Classical Review
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780521192170
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication date: 4/30/2011
  • Pages: 352
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.70 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Claudia Bolgia is Lecturer in the History of European Art at the University of Edinburgh. She has written extensively about medieval Rome and its historical and intellectual context in a range of international journals, and is on the Advisory Board for the e-journal Art in Translation.

Rosamond McKitterick is Professor of Medieval History at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of Sidney Sussex College. Her previous publications include History and Memory in the Carolingian World (Cambridge University Press, 2004), Perceptions of the Past in the Early Middle Ages (2006) and Charlemagne: The Formation of a European Identity (Cambridge University Press, 2008).

John Osborne is Professor of Art History at Carleton University, Ottawa. He is a medievalist and cultural historian who has published widely on the art and architecture of Rome and Venice between the third and sixteenth centuries.

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Table of Contents

Introduction: Rome across time and space, c.500–1400: cultural transmission and the exchange of ideas Claudia Bolgia; Part I. Roman Texts and Roman History: 1. Roman texts and Roman history in the early Middle Ages Rosamond McKitterick; 2. Monuments and histories: ideas and images of antiquity in some descriptions of Rome Maurizio Campanelli; 3. Rome, reservoir of ancient texts? Michael Reeve; Part II. The Translation of the 'Roman' Liturgy North of the Alps: 4. The periphery rethinks the centre: inculturation, 'Roman' liturgy and the Ruthwell Cross Éamonn Ó Carragáin; 5. The liturgy of the 'Roman' office in England from the conversion to the conquest Jesse D. Billett; 6. The Romanization of the Frankish liturgy: ideal, reality, and the rhetoric of reform Yitzhak Hen; Part III. Architectural Inspiration and Sculptural Models within and without Rome: 7. Building more romano in Francia during the third quarter of the eighth century: the abbey church of Saint-Denis and its model Judson J. Emerick; 8. Reception and renovation of Early Christian churches in Rome, c.1050–1300 Sible de Blaauw; 9. Giudizio sul Mille: Rome, Montecassino, S. Vincenzo al Volturno, and the beginnings of Romanesque John Mitchell; 10. The discourse of columns Dale Kinney; Part IV. Cultural Exchanges: 11. Design and decoration: re-visualizing Rome in Anglo-Saxon sculpture Jane Hawkes; 12. Rome and Constantinople in the ninth century John Osborne; 13. Antiquity, Rome, and Florence: coinage and transmissions across time and space William R. Day, Jr; Part V. Patrons, Artists and Ideas on the Move: 14. French patrons abroad and at home: 1260–1300 Julian Gardner; 15. Art-historical reflections on the fall of the Colonna, 1297 Paul Binski; 16. Exports to Padua Trecento style: Altichiero's Roman legacy Louise Bourdua; Part VI. Roman and Papal Jurisdictions: 17. A new Rome in a small place? Imitation and re-creation in the Patrimony of St Peter Brenda Bolton; 18. Appealing to Rome (and Avignon) before the Black Death: ecclesiastical disputes and church patronage in medieval Tuscany George Dameron.
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