Rome

Rome

4.0 1
by Daniele Luppi
     
 

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Rome, a long-gestating collaboration between producer Brian Joseph Burton (aka Danger Mouse) and Italian composer Daniele Luppi, pays tribute to Italian cinema's spaghetti Western era with the subtlety of a revolver to the forehead. Lovingly detailed, atmospheric, and oozing the Technicolor glow of a smoke-stained '70s movie screen

Overview

Rome, a long-gestating collaboration between producer Brian Joseph Burton (aka Danger Mouse) and Italian composer Daniele Luppi, pays tribute to Italian cinema's spaghetti Western era with the subtlety of a revolver to the forehead. Lovingly detailed, atmospheric, and oozing the Technicolor glow of a smoke-stained '70s movie screen, Rome is awfully hard not to cheer for, even when it's stuck on autopilot, as rarely do pet projects feel this alive and sumptuous. Burton and Luppi were wise to bring on Jack White and Norah Jones to flesh things out, as their vocal contributions provide a much-needed break from the immaculate yet familiar melodies. Jones, with her smoky timbre and laid-back delivery, brings a cool confidence to standout cuts like "Season's Trees" and "Black," while White, who spent countless hours driving around and listening to the instrumental mixes while bouncing ideas into a hand-held tape recorder, manages to make songs like "Two Against One" and "The World," the latter of which features a knockout octave vocal, feel as sinister as their intentions. Rome's instrumental bits feel nearly interchangeable with their Morricone/Tarantino counterparts, but there's a joyful lawlessness to the whole affair that makes it feel less like a lark and more like a fever dream come to unlikely fruition.

Product Details

Release Date:
05/17/2011
Label:
Parlophone (Wea)
UPC:
0603497912162
catalogNumber:
791216
Rank:
59768

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Daniele Luppi   Primary Artist,Conductor,Tubular Bells,Choir Conductor
Luciano Ciccaglioni   Acoustic Guitar,Electric Guitar
Gege Munari   Percussion,Drums
Antonello Vannucchi   Organ,Piano,Celeste,Harpsichord
Gilda Buttà   Harpsichord
Norah Jones   Vocals
Jack White   Vocals
Roberto Podio   Percussion
Brian Burton   Percussion
Edda dell'Orso   Soprano,Soloist
Dario Rosciglione   Bass
Cantori Moderni Di Alessandro Alessandroni   Choir, Chorus
B.I.M. Orchestra   Performing Ensemble

Technical Credits

Fabio Patrignani   Engineer
Vance Powell   Engineer
Jeff Antebi   Artist Development
Jack White   Composer
Danger Mouse   Arranger,Composer,Producer
Ian Montone   Management
Anton Riehl   Engineer
Daniele Luppi   Arranger,Composer,Producer
Brian Burton   Composer
Kennie Takahashi   Engineer

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Rome 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
poughkeepsiejohn More than 1 year ago
When Gnarls Barkley first came on the scene, they created one of the catchiest songs of the decade, "Crazy". One of the reasons why the song was so infectuous was because of its composer and multi-instrumentalist, Danger Mouse. In the last few years, their singer, Cee Lo Green, has turned himself into a pretty good singer with "F--- You". As for Danger Mouse, he's managed to: 1) produce Beck's "Modern Love", 2) produced some tracks for The Black Keys' "Brothers", 3) created "Dark Night Of The Soul", a melancholy compilation with a wide array of artists and the photography of filmmaker David Lynch and perhaps most impressive of all, 4) he combined---albeit illegally---Jay Z's "Black Album" with The Beatles' "White Album" and created "The Grey Album", a perfect conflagaration of Nineties hip-hop and Sixties psychedelic rock that became the most requested bootleg album since Bob Dylan's "The Basement Tapes". It is hard to believe that it took Danger Mouse and Italian composer Daniele Luppi five years to make "Rome", a tribute to Spaghetti Western music that is full of Techniscope grandeur, melodramatic flourishes and sweat-laden beauty right down to the twangy guitars and eeriely gorgeous celestes. Was it worth it? I think so, especially when you consider the fact that it was recorded in Italy using old musical instruments, using ancient analog equipment and they even went so far as to recruit the Cantori Moderni, the Italian choir who worked on many Ennio Morricone western scores, to be on this stand-alone masterwork. However, if it's not enough to get you into "Rome", just check out the appearances by Jack White and Norah Jones. White's singing and lyricism on "The Rose With The Broken Neck" and "Two Against One" sound like missing links from a White Stripes session. As for Norah, she turns in brilliantly airy performances with "Season's Trees" and "Problem Queen". For a guy who once claimed to be a diehard Beatles fan, it's amazing how musically fluid Danger Mouse has become in the last few years. Anybody who can get himself involved with R&B, hip-hop, alternative rock and movie soundtracks has an infinite amount of imagination, which is sorely needed at a time when the music industry is in one of its worst slumps ever. If there's anything such as a "real deal" of a talent, Danger Mouse is it. "Rome" is a fine homage to those 1960's Spaghetti Westerns while adding a little touch of jazz and alt-rock to make it better. And what's next on Danger Mouse's agenda? Producing some work for U-2. Stay tuned.