Rome: An Empire's Story

Rome: An Empire's Story

4.0 3
by Greg Woolf
     
 

ISBN-10: 019977529X

ISBN-13: 9780199775293

Pub. Date: 07/10/2012

Publisher: Oxford University Press


The very idea of empire was created in ancient Rome and even today traces of its monuments, literature, and institutions can be found across Europe, the Near East, and North Africa--and sometimes even further afield.

In Rome, historian Greg Woolf expertly recounts how this mammoth empire was created, how it was sustained in crisis, and how it shaped

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Overview


The very idea of empire was created in ancient Rome and even today traces of its monuments, literature, and institutions can be found across Europe, the Near East, and North Africa--and sometimes even further afield.

In Rome, historian Greg Woolf expertly recounts how this mammoth empire was created, how it was sustained in crisis, and how it shaped the world of its rulers and subjects--a story spanning a millennium and a half of history. The personalities and events of Roman history have become part of the West's cultural lexicon, and Woolf provides brilliant retellings of each of these, from the war with Carthage to Octavian's victory over Cleopatra, from the height of territorial expansion under the emperors Trajan and Hadrian to the founding of Constantinople and the barbarian invasions which resulted in Rome's ultimate collapse. Throughout, Woolf carefully considers the conditions that made Rome's success possible and so durable, covering topics as diverse as ecology, slavery, and religion. Woolf also compares Rome to other ancient empires and to its many later imitators, bringing into vivid relief the Empire's most distinctive and enduring features.

As Woolf demonstrates, nobody ever planned to create a state that would last more than a millennium and a half, yet Rome was able, in the end, to survive barbarian migrations, economic collapse and even the conflicts between a series of world religions that had grown up within its borders, in the process generating an image and a myth of empire that is apparently indestructible. Based on new research and compellingly told, this sweeping account promises to eclipse all previously published histories of the empire.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780199775293
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Publication date:
07/10/2012
Pages:
384
Sales rank:
717,597
Product dimensions:
6.40(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.10(d)

Table of Contents

Introduction Notes on Further Reading
1. The Whole Story
2. Empires of the Mind
3. Rulers of Italy
4. Imperial Ecology
5. Mediterranean Hegemony
6. Slavery and Empire
7. Crisis
8. At Heaven's Command?
9. The Generals
10. The Enjoyment of Empire
11. Emperors
12. Resourcing Empire
13. War
14. Imperial Identities
15. Recovery and Collapse
16. A Christian Empire
17. Things fall Apart
18. The Roman Past and the Roman Future Key Dates in Roman History Bibliography Endnotes

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Rome: An Empire's Story 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Topics jump around a bit and there is some repetition, but the book is very well written and the subject interesting. Author provides additional related book titles and authors for further review at the end of each chapter. Helpful if you are interested in that chapter's subject.
Morgan_N More than 1 year ago
I learned a lot form this book the Author was very educated and obtained information from some other sources but not many. The Book wasn’t persuasive at all it was just all facts and of course there was some things that could not be proven but historians did make an educated guess with the information that they did have. A little over 300 pages it hit on religion government, culture, and economics over a very long time period. Woolf does a good job of giving examples of different viewpoints and really allows you to make your own decision about whether this person was good or bad. One of many examples would be if the Roman Empire attacking Carthage was a good thing or a bad thing? Was it good to destroy another empire just to expand yours? And was Rome greedy? This was great of him to do because it really allowed you to think and consider how you saw Rome but giving you facts to go off of. The book didn’t expand on a lot material, and it is understandable that covering all of Rome in one book is hard. Being able to give every detail is impossible but the book could have gone more in depth in a lot of different areas. For example going more in depth with the fall of the Roman Empire would have been a lot better. There was a lot on how the Empire rose but it wasn’t much on how Rome fell, just a little more than two chapters. The book didn’t impact me in such a way that I would read it again or use it as another reference. The book was very informing but the lack of citations on many facts was questionable to how he acquired them. Also many of the sentences seemed hard to read and not because they were boring but because the transition wasn’t very good and the sentences didn’t flow as well as other book I have read. I would recommend it to someone that was just looking for an overview of the Roman Empire and how it rose and fell. The book does have some good facts but I don’t think this is the first choice of a book to choose for writing a paper. Overall the book kept me interested for the most part like I said before there were some dry parts but a great over view of the Roman Empire.