Rome, Ostia, Pompeii: Movement and Space

Overview

Rome, Ostia, Pompeii captures how studies of the Roman city are currently shifting away from architecture towards a dynamic understanding of activities within the urban space. This is becoming a defining feature of new and innovative research on the nature of ancient urbanism and is underpinned by an understanding of the relationship between space and society - the two sides of the core dialectic of the 'Spatial Turn' in cultural studies. In this volume a new generation of scholars provide detailed case studies ...

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Overview

Rome, Ostia, Pompeii captures how studies of the Roman city are currently shifting away from architecture towards a dynamic understanding of activities within the urban space. This is becoming a defining feature of new and innovative research on the nature of ancient urbanism and is underpinned by an understanding of the relationship between space and society - the two sides of the core dialectic of the 'Spatial Turn' in cultural studies. In this volume a new generation of scholars provide detailed case studies of the three best known cities from antiquity, Pompeii, Ostia, and Rome, and focus on the movement or flow of a Roman city's inhabitants and visitors, demonstrating how this movement contributes to our understanding of the way different elements of society interacted in space. Through a uniquely broad range of historical issues, such as the commoditization of movement in patronage relationships, the appropriation of 'architectural space' by 'movement space', the importance of movement and traffic in influencing representations of ancient urbanism and the Roman citizen, this volume studies movement as it is found both at the city gate, in the forum, in the portico, and on the street, and as it is represented in the text and on the page.

Throughout this book, the authors are concerned with the residues of movement - the impressions left by the movement of people and vehicles, both as physical indentations in the archaeological record and as impressions upon the Roman urban consciousness. The volume's interdisciplinary approach will inform the understanding of the city in classics, ancient history, archaeology and architectural history, as well as cultural studies, town planning, urban geography, and sociology.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780199583126
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • Publication date: 2/20/2012
  • Pages: 464
  • Product dimensions: 6.40 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Ray Laurence is Professor of Roman History and Archaeology at the University of Kent. In 2006 he won the 'Longman-History Today New Generation Prize for book most likely to inspire the young to study history' for his volume Pompeii The Living City.

David J. Newsome was awarded his PhD in 2010 from the University of Birmingham. He won the BABESCH-Byvanck Award in 2008 for his innovative research on traffic and urban change at Pompeii. Both have published widely on the Roman city.

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Table of Contents

Dedication
Table of contents
Preface
Acknowledgments
Notes on Contributors
Introduction
Making Movement Meaningful, David J. Newsome
Part I: Articulating Movement and Space
1. Movement and the Linguistic Turn: Reading Varro s de Lingua Latina, Diana Spencer
2. Literature and the Spatial Turn: Movement and Space in Martial s Epigrams, Ray Laurence
3. Measuring spatial visibility, adjacency, permeability and degrees of street life in Pompeii, Akkelies van Nes
4. Towards a Multisensory Experience of Movement in the City of Rome, Eleanor Betts
Part II: Movement in the Roman city: infrastructure and organisation
5. The Power of Nuisances on the Roman Street, Jeremy Hartnett
6. Pes dexter: Superstition and the state in the shaping of shop-fronts and street activity in the Roman world, Steven Ellis
7. Cart Traffic Flow in Pompeii and Rome, Alan Kaiser
8. Where to Parka Carts, Stables and the Economics of Transport in Pompeii
9. The Spatial Organisation of the Movement Economy: The Analysis of Ostia s scholae, Hanna Stoger
Part III: Movement and the Metropolis
10. The Street Life of Ancient Rome, Claire Holleran
11. The City in Motion: Walking for transport and leisure in the city of Rome, Elizabeth Macaulay-Lewis
12. Movement and Fora in Rome (the Late Republic to the first century CE), David J. Newsome
13. Movement, gaming and the use of space in the forum, Francesco Trifilo
14. Construction Traffic in Imperial Rome: Building the Arch of Septimius Severus, Diane Favro
15. Movement and urban development at two city gates in Rome: the Porta Esquilina and Porta Tiburtina, Simon Malmberg and Hans Bjur
Endpiece
From Movement to Mobility: Future Directions, Ray Laurence
Bibliography

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