A Room of One's Own / Edition 1

A Room of One's Own / Edition 1

4.0 44
by Virginia Woolf
     
 

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ISBN-10: 1551114283

ISBN-13: 9781551114286

Pub. Date: 01/28/2001

Publisher: Broadview Press

This Broadview edition provides a reliable text at a very reasonable price. It contains textual notes but no appendices or introduction.

Overview

This Broadview edition provides a reliable text at a very reasonable price. It contains textual notes but no appendices or introduction.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781551114286
Publisher:
Broadview Press
Publication date:
01/28/2001
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
134
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.31(d)

Table of Contents


CONTENTS
Preface: Virginia Woolf ix

Chronology xix

Introduction xxxv

A Room of One's Own 1

Notes to A Room of One's Own 113

Suggestions for Further Reading: Virginia Woolf 143

Suggestions for Further Reading: A Room of One's Own 147

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A Room of One's Own 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 44 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you like an analytical book that is packed with ideas, then _A Room of One¿s Own_ by Virginia Woolf is the book for you. The style in this book is particularly unique. Incorporating words of her own with quotes of several famous authors of her day, Virginia Woolf proceeds to explain what a woman needs in order to write well and purely. These include having a stable income and a quiet room of one¿s own. ¿Why did men drink wine and women water? Why was one sex so prosperous and the other so poor? What effect has poverty on fiction? What conditions are necessary for the creation of works of art?¿ These are only some of the questions that she tries to answer. Women, she explains, have been made inferior by men, so that men can feel superior. She points out that if Shakespeare had a gifted sister, Judith, she would never be given a chance by men or society to develop and display her talent just because she was a woman. The reader is stricken by the book¿s truth, and reminded of the social differentiation that is still present in society today. Woolf¿s thoughts wander and jump, as she strolls in the park or gazes though her window, but they still flow efficiently, giving the reader the feeling the he is following her, and she is sharing her thoughts face to face. Eventually her ideas, stories, and quotes fall smoothly in place, as she makes her ultimate point. The book reads like an essay, combining the stories of several female artists, both recognized and unrecognized in society, concluding that women are not inferior by birth, but rather by the discriminations of society.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is an extraordinary treatise on women and fiction. Woolf examines the subject closely, as if through a magnifying glass, and from so many angles. This covers history, the relationship between men and women, the psychology of the genders, and so much more. While cool and critical on the surface, this seems to be seething with passion and fire underneath. The writing is exquisite, rich in imagery and symbolism. I read this in one day, but I would love to re-read this at a more leisurely pace sometime. I think that every woman who loves to read or who writes should read this!
Danibelle More than 1 year ago
A Room of One's Own is Virginia Woolf's statement about the place of women in society during her lifetime. Imagine being invited to speak at an extremely prestigious university and then told you needed an escort to enter the library.
songcatchers More than 1 year ago
I can concede that the theme of this essay is noble...but...the content is a bit boring and dry. I will say that Virginia Woolf had some poetic ideas! There are two main ideas that I particularly liked in this essay. The first being Shakespeare's Sister.

Woolf points out that if Shakespeare would have had a sister who was born with the same genius that is Shakespeare, she would not have been remembered because her artistry would have been allowed no outlet.....because she was a female.

The other point I took away from this essay ties in with Shakespeare's Sister. Women need "a room of one's own" and freedom from the worry of everyday living in order to write fiction. Woolf illustrates how these needs were not met throughout history for women. That is why there is no Shakespeare's Sister.

This essay is not the most exciting book I've read lately. But taken for what it is, Virginia Woolf does make her point heard
Guest More than 1 year ago
I found it amazing that this book seemed to have been written yesterday in a sense. It had some very thought provoking statements and I feel like I should read it on a daily basis just to affirm its lessons. It made me wish I had a trustfund coming my way so I could know the luxury of life on one's own by their own means and could take my time to write.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is absolutely fabulous. Wolfe provides a fresh outlook on feminism. Her distinct word choice and use of metaphors and similes make for thought provoking reading. Her views on feminism are far from female idolization as she points out that women are far from being perfect while at the same time illustrating the demorilizing and unfair limitations put on women by society and by men as a whole.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Brilliant woman!!! This is the first thing I have read by Woolf and I was throughly impressed. Woolf had this subject suggested to her--to write about women and fiction. What she does is explore the subject throughly: women characters in fiction, women who write fiction, and why not many women wrote much at all throughout history. She explores her ideas as to why men wrote women in so many different lights (from saintly to inferior to evil) and why they wrote so much about them at all. In doing so, she examines sexism throughout the ages and in her own time period. I would have given this five stars but her style of writing became a bit laborious at times to read. I wish I could give her 4 and a half! But like I said: this is my first venture into reading Virginia Woolf and it will most definately NOT be my last!!!
GiselleBurciaga More than 1 year ago
he dramatic setting of the novel is that Woolf has been invited to lecture on the topic of Women and Fiction. It examines whether women were capable of producing work of the quality of William Shakespeare, amongst other topics. She refers to this thesis often in the lecture, modifying the language a bit. She tells her audience she is not sure if the topic should be what women are like; the fiction women write; the fiction written about women; or a combination of the three. Instead, she has come up with "one minor point--a woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction." She says she will use a fictional narrator as her alter ego to relate how her thoughts on the lecture mingled with her daily life.I believe that to be, or to understand, an intellectual woman in this century, one must read this book. There is no mistaking Woolf's writing style: intricate, introspective, convoluted and then again portraying ideas and situations with brilliant clarity and insight. Yes, the book is supposed to be about women and fiction, but it offers so much more acute observations on literature, disparities in society between sexes, interity of writing and activity of reading. Her writing style is fluid, beautifully and flawlessly transitions between facts, observations, thoughts and insight as well. Unlike number of feminist writers, Woolf does not make the mistake of tearing down the accomplishments of men in order to make room for those of women. Indeed, she speaks eloquently against just that danger throughout "A Room of One's Own," which is partly what allows it to stand not only as a feminist classic, but also as a classic piece of both literature and literary criticism. It is not often that an essay reaches creative heights great enough to establish itself equally as a work of art and an intellectual effort, but Woolf has done it here. She does not waste her words or her energy on destructive, angry prattling. She writes with a depth of humanity that challenges us to be better writers, better thinkers, and better people. What I find interesting about Woolf is her ability to make her essay become so much like fiction, and thus, easier to read for many people. I highly recommend this extraordinary long essay to both men and women to everyone interested in the creative process. It is a brilliantly written, perceptive thesis.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
very useful
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
With plenty of space including own bathroom and car. now its own bedroom where you do nothing but sleep too dated remibds me of the sci fi trii where one had a crowded planet with commune baths wc and food no kitchens and the other planet one person per estate with drones get real
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Impossible to describe; impossible not to read again. It's inspiring
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