Room with a Zoo

Overview

Julie wants a dog more than anything in the world, but her parents won't let her have one until she's old enough to walk it by herself. Julie does manage to collect some other pets while she waits, though: a sick cat, a hamster, a big, ugly fish, six smaller fish to keep the big fish company, a turtle, a strong-minded kitten, an unresponsive hermit crab, and a borrowed classroom rabbit that seems to be dying. All in one bedroom. Is enough ever enough for this critter ...
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Overview

Julie wants a dog more than anything in the world, but her parents won't let her have one until she's old enough to walk it by herself. Julie does manage to collect some other pets while she waits, though: a sick cat, a hamster, a big, ugly fish, six smaller fish to keep the big fish company, a turtle, a strong-minded kitten, an unresponsive hermit crab, and a borrowed classroom rabbit that seems to be dying. All in one bedroom. Is enough ever enough for this critter connoisseur?
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Editorial Reviews

From The Critics
Julie's parents say no to the dog she desperately wants. Instead, they settle on a cat. Then a hamster. Then fish, a turtle, a hermit crab, and so on. Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist Feiffer's kinetic black-and-white illustrations add zest to this comic story of pets who take over a New York City apartment. Based on Feiffer's own family and told from his daughter's point of view, this hilarious, heartwarming tale is ideal for young animal lovers, who will feel as though they have experienced firsthand the pains of pet ownership (cannibalistic fish and an antisocial cat, to name just two) as well as the perks. (ages 8 to 12)
Child magazine's Best Children's Book Awards 2005
Publishers Weekly
Feiffer's (The Man in the Ceiling) middle-grade novel of familial love and hardship introduces Julie, the animal-loving daughter of Jules and Jenny Feiffer. While Julie's parents-particularly her mother-do not share their daughter's adulation for the animal kingdom, they do indulge her desires, as new pets file through their Upper West Side Manhattan apartment (which has nine rooms, in case one wonders what sort of abode could accommodate a cat, hamster, turtle, several fish and-briefly-the classroom rabbit, among others). However, Feiffer does not shy away from showing the less rewarding moments in pet ownership, such as a murderous goldfish that attacks smaller fish and a terrified cat that can't handle road trips. And despite the veritable pet parade, Julie is still holding out for her "big ask," the one she covets most-a dog. Although there may be little doubt that she will get one, the family grows closer through dealing with the ups and downs of pet care, and Julie herself learns some important lessons ("If I got rid of Oscar, then maybe I should be gotten rid of too. Since my parents would never do that and I was kind of Oscar's parent, how could I do it to him?"). Young animal lovers should have no trouble identifying with this spunky heroine's intense range of emotions, brought on by her menagerie. Ages 7-up. (Sept.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal
Gr 2-4-Writing from the point of view of his nine-year-old daughter, Feiffer recounts the pet-strewn pathway to her finally getting a dog. Her indulgent parents feed Julie's passion for animals by getting a string of substitute animals that don't need to be walked: a cat proves standoffish, so they buy a hamster to entertain the cat. Next comes a carnivorous fish that eats its companions. Then a turtle. This lengthy chapter book includes the child's various friends, school scenes, and a trip to the country to visit a stepsister, which produces yet another cat, but a warm and friendly one. The final chaos, which involves her father falling and throwing his back out, the girl trying to wash a murky fish tank by herself while keeping the cats and hamster apart, and an ensuing trip to the emergency room, reads like a Keystone Kops episode. It isn't until Julie bravely receives 19 stitches that she gets her dog. Feiffer's hilarious ink-and-wash illustrations keep Julie and the animals in focus. Some children may delight in the tone of the narration, the childlike logic, and the winning way she takes charge of her pets and herself by story's end. Others will be turned off by this overindulged child, the wordy text, and the somewhat ludicrous idea that you buy five or six other pets before getting the one that the child really wants.-Susan Hepler, Burgundy Farm Country Day School, Alexandria, VA Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
"I have a zoo in my room. I need it. Because I'm either going to be a vet when I grow up or a zookeeper." Indeed, to say Julie, nine, is obsessed with animals would be an understatement. Julie's first pet ever is a sickly cat from the animal shelter named Timmy-a disaster. The make-up-for-the-disaster pet is a hamster, and a motley menagerie soon follows. Feiffer's vivacious illustrations that scamper through the pages are as spare and expressive as ever, and offer the first clue that Julie is African-American, adopted by a white family. While adoption isn't the main theme, the fact that Julie is essentially adopting animals makes for some cleverly subtle parallels. (She realizes when her fish Oscar eats his tankmate: "You have to keep your child even if he's bad"). Julie's voice and perspectives are childlike and often hilarious, effectively captured in breathless run-on sentences or short choppy ones. Children and adults alike will appreciate everything from over-the-top slapstick fiascos to Julie's wonderfully funny, insightful observations of pet-human and human-human dynamics. (Fiction. 7-10)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780786837038
  • Publisher: Hyperion Books for Children
  • Publication date: 10/2/2007
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 192
  • Age range: 7 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 1.00 (w) x 1.00 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author


Jules Feiffer is a Pulitzer-Prize winning syndicated comic-strip cartoonist and author. He has written and illustrated more than ten books, including I'm Not Bobby, By the Side of the Road, and The Daddy Mountain. Jules lives in New York City with his family.

Biography

Born the Bronx in 1929, Jules Feiffer got his first taste of the artistic accolades that were to come his way in the form of a gold medal awarded to him at the age of five in a school art contest. His love of art persisted throughout his childhood -- and after forging a career as a Pulitzer Prize-winning political cartoonist, he would find success writing and illustrating books for children himself.

After high school, Feiffer’s talent for drawing led him to the Art Students League of New York and later earned him admittance to Brooklyn’s renowned Pratt Institute. His first paying job as a cartoonist was under the tutelage of idol Will Eisner, the famous father of the classic 1940s cartoon, “The Spirit.” Feiffer’s apprenticeship and fledgling comic strip career were interrupted, however, when he was drafted into the Army. There, he spent what little free time he was allowed doodling sketches with a decidedly anti-military bent, and his famous “Munro” character -- a four-year-old boy drafted into the Army by mistake -- was born.

After serving his time in the Army, Feiffer developed the comic strip Sick, Sick, Sick: A Guide to Non-confident Munro, which was later renamed, simply, Feiffer. The strip appeared regularly in publications from The Village Voice to The New York Times from 1956 to 1997, and Feiffer’s trademark style -- stark, scribbled figures emoting against a white background -- was promptly adopted by political cartoonists around the world. In April of 1958, an animated rendition of Sick, Sick, Sick won an Academy Award in the Short-Subject Cartoon category, and in 1996, Feiffer was awarded the Pulitzer for his biting editorial cartoons.

Feiffer's knack for capturing the turmoil of his times carried over from cartoons into other media. His play Little Murders -- a wry exploration of violence in urban life -- garnered several accolades when it was presented in 1967, among them the London Theatre Critics, Outer Circle Critics and Obie Awards. As New York Times theater reviewer Clive Barnes commented, "[Feiffer] muses on urban man, the cesspool of urban man's mind, the beauty of his neurosis, and the inevitability of his wilting disappointment." Feiffer's other plays include White House Murder Case (1970) and Anthony Rose (1990). In addition, Feiffer wrote the screenplays for several feature films, most notably Carnal Knowledge (1971) and Popeye (1980).

Feiffer’s motivation to write his first children’s book, according to legend, came from good old-fashioned spite. The story goes that a longtime friend of Feiffer's (who he won’t name) came up with a concept for a children's book based on their shared love of the movies. Feiffer agreed to hand over the illustrating duties to his friend and give writing it a shot, and toughed out every line. When he called the friend to report on his progress, Feiffer found out -- to his fury -- that his friend had decided to write it himself. Although his friend later apologized, Feiffer decided that in the end, they should each do their own books. He changed the subject of his work in progress from the movies to comic books, and The Man in the Ceiling -- a semi-autobiographical tale bout a boy and his love for drawing -- was born.

Selected by Publishers Weekly as one of the best children's books of 1993, the book was a runaway hit with kids and parents. Feiffer continued writing for his new, less jaded audience, offering up A Barrel of Laughs, A Vale of Tears (1998), I Lost My Bear (1998), Meanwhile… (1999), Bark, George (1999), I’m Not Bobby!, (2000) By the Side of the Road (2001), and The House Across the Street (2002). Far from the stark stencils that are his political cartoons, his children’s illustrations wriggle with life, their curvier lines in no way softening the lessons within.

Good To Know

Feiffer is the only cartoonist to have a comic strip published by The New York Times.

A fan of comic strips from an early age, Feiffer started to draw at the age of six. His favorites were Flash Gordon, Popeye, and Terry and the Pirates.

Feiffer didn't want Jack Nicholson cast for the lead in the 1971 film Carnal Knowledge, for which he wrote the screenplay. Director Mike Nichols fought Feiffer on the casting and finally convinced him to approve the up-and-coming actor.

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    1. Hometown:
      New York, New York
    1. Date of Birth:
      January 26, 1929
    2. Place of Birth:
      New York, New York
    1. Education:
      The Pratt Institute, 1951

Read an Excerpt

A ROOM with a ZOO


By JULES FEIFFER

Hyperion Books for Children

Copyright © 2005 Jules Feiffer
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0-7868-3702-0


Chapter One

I have a zoo in my room. I need it. Because I'm either going to be a vet when I grow up or a zookeeper.

My father and mother and sister know I love animals. Even before I had my first, we were watching TV in my parents' bedroom and a commercial came on for dog food. I said, "I want a dog." I knew they'd say no.

And my father said, "No. You can't have a dog because you're too young to walk a dog and your mother doesn't like dogs and your sister is sixteen and she's got school and acting classes after school so she's not going to have time, so who do you think is going to end up walking your dog?"

And I said, "You." And he said, "No, and this is why not. I've owned two dogs and walked them all hours of the day and night and I'm too old to do that ever again all by myself. You can have a dog when you're old enough to walk your dog by yourself. And sometimes I'll walk him with you."

"How old do you have to be?" I asked. "Twelve," my father said. "Eleven," my mother said. "Eleven and a half," my father said. "Ten," I said. "Eleven," my father said. "Ten and a half," my mother said.

That's when I got my good idea. "You don't have to walk a cat, do you?"

I could tell how really good the idea was by the expression on their faces. I could have counted up to ahundred before they said anything.

It was my mother first. "I don't see how we can get out of this."

My father said, "I think we've been tricked."

So we agreed on a cat.

Chapter Two

The cat was called Timmy. We got him from an animal shelter. He was just a kitten. And he had a cold. And he wouldn't eat or drink anything, and he just lay there not moving at all.

His color was like a tiger but without the stripes. Though you could see on his fur or coat where stripes should have been but they weren't. His hair was short and spiky and when I petted him, it was like I stroked straw.

I held him in my arms and in my lap. I wanted to keep him on my pillow when I went to bed, but my mother and father wouldn't let me because they were afraid I'd wake up and he'd be dead.

The first two days my father was on the phone to the animal shelter maybe ten times. Every time he hung up, he looked sadder. "What did they say?" me or my mother would ask, and every time my father gave the same answer, "They said, 'No problem.'" As if "No problem" was a kind of evil curse-like Timmy was as good as dead. It made me want to cry.

My mother hugged me and got mad at my father. She said to me, "The cat will be fine, I promise." I could tell from the way she was glaring at him that it was my father's turn. So he said, "The cat will be fine, Julie. Your mother and I promise."

I knew he didn't believe it. But Timmy was my first and my one and only pet, so I also knew they couldn't let him die.

My father and mother and even my sister Halley took turns feeding Timmy with an eyedropper. He hardly moved. All day he just lay in one spot on the rug where the sun came in the window in the morning. My mother was nervous about a sick cat pooping in the wrong place, so wherever Timmy was lying she'd go get the litter box and put it next to him and point to it and smile. "See, Timmy? Good Timmy."

I didn't mind where he pooped, I just wanted him to get better.

It took two weeks and three visits to the vet. My father had to shove pills down his throat. Timmy spit them up. My father shoved the pill down again, and he'd hold Timmy's mouth shut tight like the vet told him. He'd stroke Timmy's throat like the vet told him. My mother and Halley and I stood around and said, "Good Timmy." It didn't matter. Timmy spit up all the pills. It was as if he didn't care if he got better or not. Only we did.

My mother and Halley, even if they didn't like animals so much, kept saying in this fake way, "I think he looks better, don't you think so?"

And when they didn't say it, I did. We hoped that saying the lie would make it come true.

And one morning I woke up and I found Timmy, looking twice as big as yesterday, scratching to pieces one of the legs of the couch which my mother got when we moved in, before I was alive. Another couch leg was already in shreds.

My mother started crying. "I'll kill that cat!" she said. But the rest of us were happy, with me the happiest.

Chapter Three

Maybe because he was so sick when we got him, Timmy was a scaredy-cat. He didn't let me pet him. He'd see me coming and sneak off in the other direction, which wasn't at all the way he was when he was sick. Then he always let me pick him up. I'd lay him down in my lap and he wouldn't mind staying all day, and all night too if I didn't have to get up to eat or go to the bathroom.

But now that he was all better I had to go hunt him down. It was so unfair. I'd walk into my bedroom and see his tail vanish under my bed, like he couldn't get away fast enough. So I'd crawl under the bed after him saying, "Come here, Timmy" in a very friendly and kind voice, so he'd know that the last thing I wanted to do was hurt him.

But the way he backed off from me, making himself small and flat in the shadows against the wall under my bed, it was as if I was a criminal who went around killing cats. That's how this cat who was my pet treated me. Even though I nursed him when he was sick. He could have been dead, but did he even think of that?

"Come here, Timmy," I'd say in every pleasant way that I knew how. And it didn't matter to him. He looked at me like he wanted to scream, "Here comes the cat murderer!" His eyes bugged out, his whole body curled up like this: . And if he didn't run away, he made as if he was going to claw me. I reached out to him anyway to pet him. He cringed almost like my hand was a shotgun.

He wasn't always bad to me. Sometimes if I was doing something, looking at a book or I don't know what, playing with my Barbies, and my mind was a million miles away, I would look up and there he was-sitting so close I was surprised, staring right at me. And if I didn't move or do a thing, he went on staring as if we were almost friends. But if I said, "Hello, Timmy, how are you, I love you," his eyes looked at me like he was thinking, "Call the police!" And if I got up to pet him, he'd be out of there so fast I could tell he was thinking, "She's going to kill me! Dial 911!"

"I don't want this cat," I said to my mother.

"You asked for a cat, now you've got one and you don't want it," she said, as if Timmy was my fault.

"I didn't ask you to get me a cat who hates me. I hate him too."

"No, you don't," said my father, who thinks he knows what I think better than I do. "Timmy has to get used to you. You have to learn to be patient."

"Why should I learn to be patient for a cat who hates me? He should like me, because otherwise why have a pet? Nobody gets a pet because you hope someday he'll get used to you and like you. I want a nice pet. Or a dog."

So because they felt bad for me, and they weren't getting me a dog, my father took me to the pet store three blocks away to look for a make-up pet. We got a hamster.

Chapter Four

Who knew a hamster would be such a complicated animal to buy? Before my father let me get mine, he made me wait while he looked over the entire pet store for anything that had to do with hamsters. Different cages and tanks and water bottles and what to feed them and wheels and soft stuff for a bed like wood chips but not sawdust because it's not good for a hamster's breathing, the pet store man told us. My father didn't ask him why, so he didn't say. I wanted to ask him, but out of the house I'm very shy.

That must have been the only question my father didn't ask, but it could have been worse. It could have been my mother. When my father asks a question, he waits for an answer and then he's satisfied. Sometimes, though, he has to ask the question again because he forgets the answer the minute he hears it, not all the time but sometimes. But my mother asks questions more like it's a conversation with her best friend, with the actual question maybe five minutes later at the end. Then she has a whole other conversation about the answer. So it could be nighttime before we're out of the store.

I was getting impatient. I tugged at my father's coat to remind him that it was time to make our pick and go home. I could have been playing with my hamster for an hour by now except for my father's questions. I nudged him, and poked him, but I couldn't get him to move.

He said, "We have to prepare for the hamster's arrival the way we prepared for yours. Do you think when you were a baby we brought you home to an apartment without a crib?"

"My hamster's going to sleep in a crib?"

"Don't be a wiseguy," my father said.

Because we made such a bad mistake getting Timmy with a cold, I made sure when I looked over the hamsters that the one I picked wasn't sneezing or sniffling or the slightest bit coldy. Also I made sure not to get a hamster lying way back in the cage full of hamsters like he was afraid of me. Timmy taught me a good lesson about pets not to get. You look for the opposite of pets like Timmy-a perky and friendly hamster who comes to you and cuddles with you and lets you hold him in your hand, and doesn't look like he wants to call the police.

The hamster I got was very furry, small, and a light brown, kind of tan almost. He wasn't shy with me at all, which is one reason I wanted him, but the other reason was he had this look, as if all he wanted most in the world was for some kid to love him.

I was that kid. I was lucky. I named him Hammy.

"That's a terrible name," Halley said when I brought him home. But then she started calling him by his name right away. "Hello, Hammy." "Are you happy to be in our home?" "You're going to be very happy here, Hammy."

Chapter Five

"Why are you putting his cage up so high?" I asked my father, who was clearing my picture books off a shelf in the bookcase by the radiator in my room. It was the second shelf from the top, where I would have to stand on a chair to play with Hammy.

"I don't want him scared by the cat."

"Timmy will be the one who's scared," I said.

"Julie, Hammy is a rodent. He's like a mouse."

I thought he was saying that to scare me. Sometimes he says things to scare me. Anyhow, how could he be sure?

"Maybe they could be friends?"

"Are you out of your mind?" Halley said. But she always says that to me, so I didn't pay attention.

"I see cats and dogs who are friends, so why can't a cat make friends with a hamster? What if I put my hamster and my cat together and they learned to be friends, wouldn't that be a good thing to try? Especially if I'm going to be a vet?"

At last Hammy was up on his bookshelf in his very own cage, hiding out in his little plastic house with a peephole that he was too scared to peep out of. But that didn't last long-I think he was waiting for us to be alone. Because as soon as my mother and father and Halley had come and gone, which only took maybe three or four minutes, he peeked out at me from his cubbyhole. I was standing on a chair, waiting for him with a piece of lettuce. "Hello, Hammy," I said. He peeked out a little bit more, and then some more, and I could tell from the look in his eyes that he was trying to make up his mind, in or out. So I said maybe ten times, "Nice Hammy, have some lettuce, Hammy." I said it especially quiet, not to shock him because he was so small. And I thought my voice ought to be extra high like I was a really little kid until he got used to me.

So soon, very soon, he was completely out of his hole, his furry body shivering like he had a hundred little muscles pounding away inside it. But not because he was afraid, just that he was nervous in his new home. I could tell by the way he came up to me, when I was poking the lettuce at him through the wires of the cage. He did it without a one-step-back-and-forth thing, as if he liked me. He came at me an inch at a time. I think he wanted to get to know me better. For a second or two he didn't even bother with the lettuce in my hand. Then he started nibbling. I was excited.

And who should show up to join our party? Timmy. I looked around the room for no reason, and there he was, practically six inches away, staring up at Hammy in his cage. I said, "Timmy, meet your new friend Hammy. You're going to live together so you can't eat him, okay?" I didn't expect Timmy to understand. I knew if I took Hammy out, then and there, Timmy would try to eat him. I'm not stupid.

But I was sure that with the experiment I was going to begin-this Great Experiment of mine-that after Timmy got used to Hammy, after I trained him, he would see how adorable and playful and like a little kitten he was, like a little Timmy himself, if he hadn't been so sick when we first got him.

I told my sister about my Great Experiment. "You are out of your mind" was what she said to me, but since that's what she always says, I didn't even listen. She sounded exactly the same as my mother and father warning me that Hammy was a mouse as far as Timmy goes. Except that also didn't bother me, because grown-ups know lots of old stuff they call "experience," and they think that makes them right all the time. But they can be wrong. Like my mother and father are always apologizing. "I'm sorry," he says. "No, I'm sorry," she says. So if they keep saying they're sorry, it proves they know they can be wrong. So why can't they be wrong about my Great Experiment, making Timmy and Hammy best friends?

Chapter Six

My best friend-actually one of my three best friends-came for an after-school play date to see my cat and hamster. Natasha's adopted like me, but not like I am, from Mount Juliet, Tennessee. She's from Russia. She was a year old when her parents went over to get her, so she doesn't have an accent. And the next year they got divorced, Natasha thinks it was over her. Her mother says no, but I think she's right because her father didn't get divorced over her two older brothers, but a year after they got her he moved out. She stays with him every other weekend, though it's more the babysitter she hangs out with.

Natasha's the smartest kid in our grade and she shows off, kind of. I only mind it a little because I learn from her, even more than from my parents. She knows stuff that grown-ups don't think of that kids want to learn.

Natasha's mother won't let her have pets because she had a guinea pig once and it died after a week. Natasha's mother said she had enough problems with no husband and three children without taking on the extra problem of a pet who you didn't know from day to day if it was going to live or die. So Natasha likes to have play dates with friends whose parents let them have pets. Then she goes home and tells her mother about it, and that way someday she maybe can persuade her mother to buy her a parakeet, which is what she wants.

Natasha wants a parakeet as much as I want a dog. She's an expert on parakeets. She said they live seven or eight years, but some live as old as twenty. A healthy parakeet has smooth, kind of shiny feathers and the way you can tell if he's sick is if his feathers are puffed up. And the way you can tell if he's healthy is if he's playing and fussing with his feathers.

My father and mother don't know any of this stuff.

Boy parakeets have blue or bluish skin up by their nostrils, but a girl's skin is more brownish, at least that's what Natasha said. Parakeets like to trim their beaks by chewing on their perches, so you have to make sure they have wood and not plastic perches. Natasha said she was going to make her own perch when her mother lets her get a parakeet. She was going to carve it herself from an apple tree that isn't sprayed with chemicals. But she didn't tell me how she'd know whether it's sprayed or not. I wouldn't know. I'm not sure I'd recognize an apple tree if apples weren't falling off it.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from A ROOM with a ZOO by JULES FEIFFER Copyright © 2005 by Jules Feiffer. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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