Roone: A Memoir

Roone: A Memoir

by Roone Arledge
     
 

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Roone Arledge's extraordinary career of more than a half century mirrors the history of the television industry he helped create. Roone is the vivid, intimate account of his own rise to fame and power as the head of both ABC Sports and ABC News as well as an up-close-and- personal story of his era, peopled with friends and foes alike.

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Overview

Roone Arledge's extraordinary career of more than a half century mirrors the history of the television industry he helped create. Roone is the vivid, intimate account of his own rise to fame and power as the head of both ABC Sports and ABC News as well as an up-close-and- personal story of his era, peopled with friends and foes alike.

Editorial Reviews

The New York Times
This is a book of professional, not personal, reminiscence. And Arledge has an enormous amount of territory to cover. Even at more than 400 pages, it seems barely to scratch the surface of what he did, where he went and whom he met. Roone Arledge's career, full of games, contests, news breaks, was all about events. His book, like his life, can best be summarized in one word: eventful. — Bill Carter
The Los Angeles Times
Maybe television never really experienced a golden era, but Roone makes you think it did and inspires nostalgia for a time when shameless exploitation -- and an utter lack of originality -- were not network TV's defining characteristics. — Carmela Ciuraru
The New Yorker
It's hard to believe that someone actually invented the slow-motion replay - it's as if someone had invented butter -- but this was just one of many techniques by which the television producer Roone Arledge revolutionized sports coverage, from the nineteen-sixties onward. Having brought the imperatives of show business to sports, he moved on to news, creating several landmark shows, such as "20/20" and "Nightline." Arledge, who died last December, seems to have had little interest in his personal life (one wife divorced him after he bagged a Hawaiian vacation to orchestrate coverage of a college football game), and most of his memoir is an insider's account of ABC's ramshackle beginnings, its innovations as an up-and-coming network, and the difficulties brought on by corporate ownership. Not above a little score-settling but full of love for his work, Arledge is an infectious raconteur, capable of narrating even the most labyrinthine boardroom maneuvering as if it were as exciting as a sports event.
Publishers Weekly
In his long career as an executive at ABC-TV, Roone Arledge revolutionized sports and news broadcasting by emphasizing entertainment-and his posthumous memoir (he died in December at age 71), entertains as well. Arledge, who created The Wide World of Sports and Nightline, among other shows, was known as a creative but difficult genius, and no one who reads this book will have trouble understanding why he gained that reputation. He delights in telling how people opposed his innovations-such as introducing slow-motion replays and putting three men in a broadcasting booth for Monday Night Football-only later to be proven wrong. He also relishes telling war stories of his life at the network-from Jim McKay broadcasting live at the 1972 Munich Olympics to a debate between South Africa's foreign minister and Archbishop Desmond Tutu during the peak of the battle over apartheid. He also provides a behind-the scenes look at his four decades of wheeling and dealing with top executives and on-air personalities: Howard Cosell, Barbara Walters, Peter Jennings and Diane Sawyer all trace much of their stardom to Arledge's tutelage and backing. Nor is Arledge afraid to shovel some dirt. Former ABC news anchor Max Robinson is depicted as a drunk who made accusations of racism to cover up his own shortcomings. Arledge laments corporatization of the networks and the resulting decline in the quality of their news broadcasts. Anyone interested in sports, news or television in general will have difficulty putting this valuable book down. (May) Forecast: Arledge's recent death received major media coverage; this book is bound to be widely reviewed and should have a shot at bestseller lists. The first printing is 75,000. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Roone Arledge, who died last December, was a giant in the history of broadcasting. When he joined ABC Sports in 1960, the American Broadcasting Company stood a very distant third among the three television networks, and Arledge played a major role in changing that during his long, imaginative career. As he worked his way up to being named President of ABC Sports in 1968, Arledge created new programs such as Wide World of Sports and Monday Night Football, greatly expanded coverage of the Olympic Games, and introduced such technological innovations as instant replay and slow motion. His success in heading the Sports Division led to his 1977 appointment as president of ABC News, to which he gave a sweeping makeover with the development of such new programs as World News Tonight, Nightline, 20/20, Prime Time Live, and This Week with David Brinkley that led to a complete reversal of fortunes for the unit. While some would criticize Arledge's "up close and personal" style of covering both sports and news, he won 36 Emmy Awards and helped lift ABC into a leading role in the industry. Showing just how he did it, these well-crafted memoirs provide a behind-the-scenes look at prominent personalities, milestone events, and landmark programs. Highly recommended for all collections, especially for sports collections.-John Maxymuk, Rutgers Univ. Lib., Camden, NJ Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780062030733
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
10/26/2010
Sold by:
HARPERCOLLINS
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
432
Sales rank:
788,136
File size:
2 MB

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