Roosevelt

Roosevelt

by George Sylvester Viereck
     
 
This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process.

Overview

This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781117903583
Publisher:
BCR (Bibliographical Center for Research)
Publication date:
03/11/2010
Pages:
168
Product dimensions:
7.44(w) x 9.69(h) x 0.36(d)

Read an Excerpt


III. T N 1909 Roosevelt intrigued my imagination. I find several references to him in the "Confessions of a Barbarian." In Chapter III (The State Idea), I said: We have compared ourselves to the Romans. I, myself, have endorsed that comparison. But I am afraid we flatter ourselves. We are undeniably resourceful and mighty. Our dominion is wider than Rome's. We can match the Appian Way. We even have a sort of Caesar. That is what the French call him, and not without justice. Caesar was Rome. America, through Europe's glasses, is Roosevelt. We, recognizing the real master in his dual disguise, bow to Rockefeller and Morgan. On the Continent Rockefeller's memoirs met with scant success. Roosevelt's books went. Like Caesar, Roosevelt is a historian. The future will speak of both as popular leaders. Greek students will perhaps employ the Greek equivalent of the term. Perhaps every statesman must be a demagogue and every prophet a charlatan. Theodore, like the great Julius, is intensely theatrical, and intensely convulsively dynamic. Both men believed in their star. Both men, after startling domestic exploits, submerged themselves temporarily in the African jungle. Roosevelt, like Caesar, has hunted big game. But not so big as Caesar's. He has founded no kingdom by the Nile; nor followed the river to its mystical sources. [This was written before his expedition to the "River of Doubt."] And there was no Cleopatra. That would take more imagination than Mr. Roosevelt possesses. He has slain lions, instead, and penned laborious articles at a dollar a word, for the Outlook and Scribner's. And there was no Cleopatra. The absence of the Cleopatra complex constituted my chief grievanceagainst Roosevelt. I was a poet of passion. A great man without a romance to his credit seemed to...

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