Roots: The Saga of an American Family

( 153 )

Overview

This "bold...extraordinary...blockbuster..." (Newsweek magazine) begins with a birth in an African village in 1750, and ends two centuries later at a funeral in Arkansas. And in that time span, an unforgettable cast of men, women, and children come to life, many of them based on the people from Alex Haley's own family tree.

When Alex Haley was a boy growing up in Tennessee, his grandmother used to tell him stories about their family, stories ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (38) from $1.99   
  • New (4) from $4.95   
  • Used (34) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$4.95
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(64)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Type: Book - Since 1997 delivering quality books to our neighbors, all around the world!

Ships from: Arlington, TX

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$4.95
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(13)

Condition: New
2000 Hardcover New Type: Book-Since 1997 delivering quality books to our neighbors, all around the world!

Ships from: Arlington, TX

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$5.00
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(558)

Condition: New
2000-09-05 Hardcover New Hardcover w/ DJ. You are buying a Book in NEW condition with very light shelf wear. Buy it Now! ! !

Ships from: Wilmington, NC

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$45.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(162)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Roots-Thirtieth Anniversary Edition: The Saga of an American Family

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$11.49
BN.com price
(Save 39%)$18.99 List Price
This digital version does not exactly match the physical book displayed here.
Marketplace
BN.com

All Available Formats & Editions

Overview

This "bold...extraordinary...blockbuster..." (Newsweek magazine) begins with a birth in an African village in 1750, and ends two centuries later at a funeral in Arkansas. And in that time span, an unforgettable cast of men, women, and children come to life, many of them based on the people from Alex Haley's own family tree.

When Alex Haley was a boy growing up in Tennessee, his grandmother used to tell him stories about their family, stories that went way back to a man she called "the African" who was taken aboard a slave ship bound for Colonial America. As an adult, Alex Haley spent twelve years searching for documentation that might authenticate what his grandmother had told him. In an astonishing feat of genealogical detective work, he discovered the name of "the African"—Kunta Kinte, as well as the exact location of the village in West Africa from where he was abducted in 1767.

While Haley created certain unknown details of his family history, ROOTS is definitely based on the facts of his ancestry, and the six generations of people—slaves and freedmen, farmers and lawyers, an architect, teacher—and one acclaimed author—descended from Kunte Kinte. But with this book, Haley did more than recapture the history of his own family. He popularized genealogy for people of all races and colors; and in so doing, wrote one of the most important and beloved books of all time, a true Modern Classic.

This "bold . . . extraordinary . . . blockbuster . . ." Newsweek begins with a birth in 1750, in an African village; it ends seven generations later at the Arkansas funeral of a black professor whose children are a teacher, a Navy architect, an assistant director of the U.S. Information Agency, and an author. The author is Alex Haley.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Sacred Life
Roots is the fictionalized account of Alex Haley's family history and an epic narrative of the African American experience. For many African Americans, the novel and the history-making television miniseries it begot were pivotal in their understanding and appreciation of their origins. The story traces Haley's family history from the imagined birth of his ancestor Kant Kin in an African village in 1750 to the death, seven generations later, of his father in Arkansas. Based on fifteen years of research by Haley, the novel is a combination of fact and fiction&#8212it is often referred to as faction&#8212that puts a human face on the suffering of black people through the ordeal of the Middle Passage, slavery, and Jim Grow. Its combination of compelling, affectionate storytelling and informative history has had a revolutionary effect on the way Americans&#8212black and white&#8212think about the history of a people.

The story, like that of Olaudah Equiano, begins in an idyllic African world destroyed by Europeans. Haley's description of Kinte's journey to America in the hold of a slave ship is harrowing and indelibly memorable. Kinte is enslaved in America but is still proud, refusing to forsake his African name or heritage. He passes on stories of Africa to his daughter, Kizzy, who bears a child, Chicken George. George is a successful cockfighter whose father is also his master&#8212a common situation in the time of slavery but one that is treated with unusual sensitivity here. George passes the stories of his grandfather on to his children, including Tom, who marries a part-Indian woman named Irene. Tom and Irene have eight children, one of whom is Haley's grandmother. She passes the family stories to her daughter, who passes them on to Haley. Haley, in turn, tells the story, from Kunta Kinte to Chicken George, to his own grandmother, to his children.

Haley has been accused of plagiarism and his book has been criticized for historical inaccuracies, but the novel holds up as a powerful representation of the full African American saga. Haley tells the story of his family&#8212and, by extension, the story of all black people whose family histories are lost in the mists of time&#8212with an immense amount of respect and tenderness. Amidst the undeniable misery of slavery and Jim Crow, he always reveals the outstanding characteristics that sustained his family&#8212spirited resistance, cunning survival instincts, and a will to remember and pass on. James Baldwin captured the book's appeal when he wrote, "Alex Haley's taking us back through time to the village of his ancestors is an act of faith and courage, but this book is also an act of love, and it is this which makes it haunting."

Charles McGrath
....Roots is a study of continuities, of consequences, of how a people perpetuate themselves, how each generation helps to doom, or helps to liberate, the coming one. -- The New York Times Books of the Century
Library Journal
08/01/2014
Beginning with the idea that "the black story is the American story," Roots illustrates the brutal horror of slavery through Haley's discovery and interpretation of family history. Masterfully narrated by Avery Brooks.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780517208601
  • Publisher: Random House Value Publishing, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 9/5/2000
  • Series: Modern Classics Series
  • Edition number: 2000
  • Pages: 704
  • Product dimensions: 5.98 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 1.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Alex Haley (1921–1992) is the author of Roots, one of the most celebrated novels of the 1970s. He spent twenty years in the Coast Guard until beginning his writing career working for a range of magazines before becoming a ghostwriter for his first major book, The Autobiography of Malcolm X. Haley spent years tracing his own family history and decided it went back to a single African man, Kunta Kinte, who was captured in Gambia and taken to the United States as a slave. That research led to Haley’s epic book Roots, published in 1976 to wide acclaim. Haley is credited with inspiring interest in genealogy among African Americans.

Avery Brooks is an accomplished actor, director, musician, and teacher. He is well-known to global audiences for his starring role as Captain Benjamin Sisko in Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. He also costarred for three seasons as Hawk in Spenser: for Hire. His film credits include American History X, Fifteen Minutes, and The Big Hit, and his stage performances include the title roles in King Lear, Othello, and Phillip Hayes Dean’s Paul Robeson. He is a tenured professor of theater at Rutgers University.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 153 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(113)

4 Star

(19)

3 Star

(7)

2 Star

(5)

1 Star

(9)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 155 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 16, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    A Fantastic Account, truly an outstanding book

    As a young girl I remember sitting in front of the television with my family to watch Roots when it had been made into a series. Over the years I have often wanted to read the book and find all the missing parts that the limited series had left out. I am so very glad that I did. The author took me to a time when human slavery was a common place, and allowed me to feel the attrocities that took place during that time. I felt the pain, love and courage of the people and was very glad to be transported to a era that has long been forgotten and should never be. If you would like to read a book that is a fantastic read as well as a eye opening experience, read this book.

    14 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2002

    'Rooting' Out Plagiarism and Fact from Fiction

    Although Haley was obviously a great story-teller, it is important that readers understand that 'Roots' is just that -- a story. It is NOT history, it is not factual, it is fiction. This is all the more important because 'Roots' was originally published in '76 as 'non-fiction' - a very irresponsible editor's choice indeed. According to the Village Voice ('Alex Haley's Hoax' Feb. 23, 1993), 'Haley invented 200 years of family history.' Before his death, Haley admitted that he 'was just trying to give [his] people a myth to live by.' Even the little unspoiled village of Juffure where Kunta Kinte allegedly lived, was in actuality a thriving slave-trading post and its resident Africans themselves captured and sold other Africans into slavery. Not only was Haley guilty of 'genealogical creativity,' he was also a talented and admitted plagiarist. He copied copiously from a 1967 novel about slavery by Harold Courlander entitled 'The African,' as well as excerpts from 'Travels of Mungo Park' and 'The Story of Phillis Wheatley.' You decide, is a lie still a lie even when it's told with good intentions? And should we be concerned that yet another generation, 25 years later, will either read this book or watch an 8-hour TV mini-series thinking it is authentic historical drama?

    7 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Amazing.

    Alex Haley was my great-uncle, and although I never got to met him, this book helped me get to know him though his writing. This book is an exceptional story about my family's history and I am so proud of my uncle Alex for writing it.

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2010

    Book Review of Roots.

    Roots, by Alex Haley, is an unforgettable novel that might even have you reaching for the tissues. This book tells us about Americas past when we were still thirteen colonies and when slavery was a big issue for the new country. Roots opens up a perspective on slavery that most have never experienced before and some who probably never will. The book Roots by Alex Haley is a book filled with exiting characters, a suspenseful plot that will keep you turning the pages, and a theme like no other.

    The characters in this touching novel are very well detailed by the author, it's almost like your right there looking the characters in the face. The main character is Kunta, a small village boy who is very well disciplined, his mom Binta, his dad Omoro, and his three younger brothers, Lamin, Swadu, and Mali. When Kunta becomes older and earn his manhood his little brothers look up to him as a role model.

    The plot in Roots is like no other, it takes place in two places, in his home country of Africa and then the slave based America. It is extremely detailed, it's like you are there right next to the characters! The plot of Roots changes rapidly sometimes and is slow, saddened and mellow, and sometimes it is exciting, energetic.

    The theme of Roots is sometimes exciting and sometimes it is mellow. In Roots the theme changes rapidly and can sometimes surprise you. For instance one moment Kunta could be running away from slave catchers and then the next thing you know he could be in a cage with his feet and hands locked together in chains.

    The book Roots can have you reaching for the tissues or sometimes have you laughing. I recommend this book because it is a very good experience for someone who takes the time to read this book. Alex Haley's Roots, has an exciting plot of characters, a plot like no other, and a theme that can change on you within seconds.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 7, 2013

    Get over it

    There have not been slaves in america for150 years. Quit crying about the past and using it as an excuse for the present.

    2 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2013

    This book, Roots by Alex Haley is just a phenomenal book in my o

    This book, Roots by Alex Haley is just a phenomenal book in my opinion and I recommend this book to anyone that wants to learn a little bit about the history of African American slavery In America. This book tells the story of Kunta Kinte (Toby Waller), and a couple of generations after him. This book has a good sense of feel; you can also create imagery of what's going on in the story. This book is powerful enough to make you abhorrent, and bleak. 




      Since the book is set up the way that it is, you can see how far the African race has come in America. The plot starts from Africa itself, maybe not as far back as the very beginning of the slave trade, but you are still taken through the process of being nabbed, crammed into a tiny slot on a slave ship, and taken to a foreign country for labor. This is a true story that was passed down, so most likely there isn’t anything false about what the book tells you.




      Other pieces of history are in the story, I’m not going to tell because I don’t want to give the story away, there definitely are though. The conflicts are what makes the book even more interesting because you can actually put yourself into the setting and understand how the characters felt, and also real people in that time. “A story to remember” is what I call this book.




    If you didn’t know, there is a movie to this novel. I recommend that you read the book and then watch the movie to see the differences in between the two. The novel has more information in it, which is why you should choose to read the book if you are to choose only one to view. Out of all the other novels on the topic of African-American slavery, this is the most interesting and I highly recommend it.
    O-Boothe

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 1, 2013

    Xxx

    Ok from great reading, this book sure git boring as hell when the story shifted from Kunte Kinte to Chicken George...ugh..im reading thru it hoping it changes soon, or i'm putting the book down, also, its very hard to read the way Alex has these slaves talking, its hard to get thru and u have to read the same sentence over to understand.

    2 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2012

    Generation 2 Genaration

    Thnx for making the best book ever ,
    Mr or mrs haley

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2012

    Nothing like the movie

    Although nothing like the movie it helps the reader to understand the plight of slavery

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 21, 2007

    Excellent

    Great Story Stretches over 200 years and follows several different generations starting with Kunta Kinte and ending with Alex Haley. Recommend this book to everyone paints a very clear picture.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 30, 2004

    Boring!!

    This book is absolutely boring to read. All the stuff are so confusing and miswrote. I would definitely not recommended or read it again!!

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 12, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    I absolutely loved reading this book.  The movie does not do thi

    I absolutely loved reading this book.  The movie does not do this book justice, but then what movie ever does. I recommend this book to anyone and everyone I talk to.  Read it its good. 

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2014

    Historical

    Nice historical book

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2014

    Good

    I like the book. It's terrible that people actually went through all of that.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 20, 2013

    best book i have ever read, very horrible that it is based on wh

    best book i have ever read, very horrible that it is based on what really happened in America

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 17, 2013

    Awesome

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 23, 2013

    To get over it

    Afircan amiracin were in slavery for 150 years when martin luther king made his speach you should follow it not be like what it was 150 years ago. Some black people are still going through slavery

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2013

    As good as I expected

    Of course I had seen the mini series many many times, but had never read the book. As always the book has more detail, and is even better than what I already loved. I highly recommend this book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2013

    Amzaing

    One of the best books I have read!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2013

    Hated It!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    0 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 155 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)