Rope Burn

( 3 )

Overview


Richard gets frustrated by most of Mr. Best's assignments, but this latest one is the worst. He has to write a composition about a proverb that illustrates something that has happened in his life. And as if that isn't bad enough, Mr. Best has told him he needs to find his "writing voice." While working on the assignment, Richard finds his voice in more ways than one. He discovers that being himself makes a big difference in his writing and in his life.

Richard ...

See more details below
Paperback
$5.21
BN.com price
(Save 13%)$5.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (17) from $1.99   
  • New (7) from $1.99   
  • Used (10) from $1.99   
Rope Burn

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook - Digital Original)
$6.49
BN.com price
(Save 7%)$6.99 List Price
Note: Visit our Teens Store.

Overview


Richard gets frustrated by most of Mr. Best's assignments, but this latest one is the worst. He has to write a composition about a proverb that illustrates something that has happened in his life. And as if that isn't bad enough, Mr. Best has told him he needs to find his "writing voice." While working on the assignment, Richard finds his voice in more ways than one. He discovers that being himself makes a big difference in his writing and in his life.

Richard learns that being himself is good for his writing and his life.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"From the first sentence to the last, the tone of the book is engaging and true to life. " Kirkus Reviews

"This upbeat story takes a fresh approach in dealing with common concerns." School Library Journal

Children's Literature - Desiree Solso
Richard is a typical middle school student who is struggling in his writing class. At first he does not understand how rewriting random topic facts from an encyclopedia is not adequate for his writing class. That is until Mr. Best, his writing teacher, compels Richard to find his writing voice. Richard struggles to understand how to find his writing voice and what that means. In his next writing assignment, Richard's writing class focuses on taking old proverbs and creating their own. Through his writing Richard is able to find his writing voice and a way to communicate his troubles. While creating his own take on common proverbs, Richard expresses his fears and trepidations with his parents' recent divorce. In addition, as he begins to adjust to the changes in his life, he is able to connect with his past, form new friendships, and conquer goals that used to terrify him. The review questions and activities at the end of the book would be a valuable resource for a classroom. Siebold creates a great story with many interesting twists. The book would be entertaining for middle school students. In addition, this would be perfect in a classroom setting. Reviewer: Desiree Solso
Children's Literature - Kathleen Karr
After his parents' divorce, Richard finds himself living across town and facing a new school. His English teacher unexpectedly hands him the opportunity to work out his feelings when an assignment is given to write a series of stories based on proverbs. As Richard finds his voice, he also finds a best friend, survives attending his first funeral, and learns to deal with his status as a divorced child. Siebold manages to get into a troubled kid's head with her own comfortable writing style.
School Library Journal
Gr 4-6This upbeat story takes a fresh approach in dealing with common concerns. For English class, Richard is supposed to "write a composition about a proverb that illustrates something that has happened" to him. As he considers the assignment, he is overwhelmed by the number of proverbs that could apply to his life, which has recently been turned upside down by his parents' divorce and a move to a new house in another part of town. Each chapter is titled with a well-known proverb and subtitled with Richard's explanation of how the saying applies to his circumstances. Through this writing assignment, Siebold gently guides readers through cross-sections of Richard's life as he examines his past and learns to express his feelings. Kids with an eye for detail will notice the graphics at the top of each page that correspond to the chapter headings. Teachers could read this book aloud and then use its premise as a jumping-off point for similar assignments. Each chapter is an invitation for classroom discussion and can stand alone.Kit Vaughan, J. B. Watkins Elementary School, Midlothian, VA
Kirkus Reviews
Siebold gives an 11-year-old boy the chance to gain a better understanding of himself and his family through effective use of a well-worn device├ża class assignment. To fulfill a school requirement, Richard, 11, redefines well-known proverbs, then uses them as a framework to talk about the fears and feelings unleashed by his parents' recent divorce and his move to a new neighborhood. Filled with realistic dialogue and subtle humor, each short chapter offers a simple yet thought-provoking story about a different aspect of Richard's life. He writes about being the "new kid" in an unfamiliar school, becoming best friends with James, overcoming his fear of climbing the rope in gym class, feeling guilty about "secret weekends" with his father, and attending a funeral service for the first time. From the first sentence ("I hate writing") to the last, the tone of the book is engaging and true to life; Richard not only gains understanding, but discovers his own voice as well. (Fiction. 9-12)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780807571101
  • Publisher: Whitman, Albert & Company
  • Publication date: 7/1/2012
  • Pages: 96
  • Sales rank: 700,324
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.46 (w) x 8.07 (h) x 0.31 (d)

Meet the Author


Jan Siebold's career as an author began when she attended a writing seminar at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC. She has since written several books for children, including Doing Time Online and My Nights at the Improv. She lives in East Aurora, New York.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 3 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 2, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Richard likes his teacher but when Mr. Best assigns his students

    Richard likes his teacher but when Mr. Best assigns his students to write about their lives using proverbs, Richard just can't seem to come up with what is expected.  He's got plenty going on to write about--the breakup of his family, the move to a new school, and the fact that he will probably be laughed at in his PE class--but Mr. Best says Richard's writing points toward what Richard thinks Mr. Best wants, not what is really coming from Richard himself.  Valuable lessons are learned as he navigates the writing assignment, keeping secrets from his mom involving his dad's new girlfriend, and the usual social (mis)adventures that come from trying to fit in.  A great read about believing in your own self.  Although the protagonist is 11 years old, the subject matter is entirely appropriate for older readers, including those struggling with reading.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 29, 2004

    AWESOME!

    I happened to find a copy of Rope Burn in a box of books donated to our school by Scholastics. In Texas, this is the second year where tremendous emphasis has been placed on Reflective Writing. When I started reading Rope Burn I could not put it down because I could hear the boy's voice throughout. Voice being one of the traits that is essential in the writing composition made this story perfect to use as an example with our students at any grade level. Voice is Voice no matter what grade one is in.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 23, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)