×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Rosalie, My Rosalie: The Tale of a Duckling
     

Rosalie, My Rosalie: The Tale of a Duckling

by Jacquelyn Mitchard, John Bendall-brunello (Illustrator)
 

Henry Marie wants a pet so badly, she can almost taste it. She would be happy with a pony, or a kitten, or even a baby brother. But her parents always have some excuse: They can't keep a pony in their neighborhood. A kitten would make Henry and her father sneeze. Her parents keep pointing out that they do have a dog. But Scout is her father's and Scout's slow

Overview

Henry Marie wants a pet so badly, she can almost taste it. She would be happy with a pony, or a kitten, or even a baby brother. But her parents always have some excuse: They can't keep a pony in their neighborhood. A kitten would make Henry and her father sneeze. Her parents keep pointing out that they do have a dog. But Scout is her father's and Scout's slow and, well, boring. He won't chase a ball or anything! What Henry wants -- what Henry needs -- is a pet of her very own.

Just when she has about given up hope, Henry's father comes home with a fuzzy little yellow head and a rosy beak peeking out of the top pocket of his overalls. Henry immediately falls in love with the duckling's sweet, smiling face and gives her the prettiest name she can think of: Rosalie.

And that's when the trouble begins.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publishers Weekly
Mitchard (Baby Bat's Lullaby) relays an endearing tale just right for newly independent readers, focusing on the friendship between Henry, an "almost" nine-year-old girl, and her pet duckling, Rosalie. Henry is bothered by the fact that a) she was "a girl named after her father" and b) her parents are perfectly content with their "nice, quiet house and their nice, (usually) quiet little girl. The way Henry saw it, too much quiet stops being so nice." But the household becomes less tranquil when her father brings home a fuzzy duckling. As the girl and feathered friend bond, readers learn about imprinting and behavior conditioning. For instance, Rosalie, having imprinted on Henry, throws a "ducky temper tantrum" when the girl puts the pet in her cage at night; so Henry allows Rosalie to sleep on her pillow, where she leaves droppings. In a comical if improbable follow-up, Henry begins diapering her duckling until she can train her to "go flop" outdoors. The book also explores the difficulties of letting a domesticated animal loose in the wild. A cheerful conclusion caps this agreeable story, whose brief chapters and generous sprinkling of half-tone illustrations make it an ideal early chapter book. Ages 8-12. (Apr.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 2-4-In this warmhearted beginning chapter book, eight-year-old Henry has a craving for someone or something to call her own, whether it is a kitten, a horse, or a little sister. Her dream comes true when her father rescues a baby duck. The duckling is named the most beautiful name that Henry knows, Rosalie. Despite educating herself on the specific needs and behaviors of ducks, she soon learns that taking care of one is not easy. She is confronted with ducky temper tantrums, house training, and eventually the unavoidable of what to do when Rosalie grows up. An affectionate story with large print, black-and-white illustrations, short chapters, and an easy-to-follow story line.-Christine McGinty, Newark Public Library, NY Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Nine-year-old Henry is a girl who's bored with her family's quiet life, but her request for a baby or a pet is turned down until the day her father brings home a baby duckling that imprints on her. Named Rosalie, the duck becomes Henry's adored piece of luck and the two are inseparable. Nevertheless, ducks do what ducks do and even though Henry trains Rosalie to "flop" outside, as the duck grows, she needs space and water to swim. The golf course and park provide the necessary water and even wild-duck friends, but eventually Henry has to face the inevitable. The behavioral process of imprinting propels the story and becomes a sub-plot when Henry's mom becomes pregnant. Perceptive older readers may question why Rosalie didn't imprint on Henry's dad first. The large type, length and black-and-white spot art suggest an early chapter book, but adult author Mitchard's fey style, though often humorous, seems out of step with the intended audience. If it looks and walks like a duck. . . . This tale is a pleasant, but odd duck. (Fiction. 7-9)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060722197
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
04/12/2005
Pages:
128
Product dimensions:
5.31(w) x (h) x (d)
Lexile:
880L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Jacquelyn Mitchard is the New York Times bestselling author of The Breakdown Lane, Twelve Times Blessed, and The Deep End of the Ocean, which was the very first book picked by Oprah for her book club. Now You See Her was Jackie's debut young adult novel, and she also has several children's books to her credit: Baby Bat's Lullaby; Starring Prima!; Ready, Set, School!; and Rosalie, My Rosalie. Jackie lives outside Madison, Wisconsin, with her husband and eight children.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Madison, Wisconsin
Place of Birth:
Chicago, Illinois
Education:
B.A. in English, Rockford College, 1973
Website:
http://www.jacquelynmitchard.com

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews