Roscoe Is A Rakster

Roscoe Is A Rakster

5.0 1
by Janice E. Clark
     
 
Roscoe's initials are R. A. K. and Nana says they stand for "random acts of kindness" because he is always helpful. Whenever he performs a RAK, she calls him a RAKster. She says anyone can be a RAKster, even you. Just do something nice for someone. It's easy. Try it!

Overview

Roscoe's initials are R. A. K. and Nana says they stand for "random acts of kindness" because he is always helpful. Whenever he performs a RAK, she calls him a RAKster. She says anyone can be a RAKster, even you. Just do something nice for someone. It's easy. Try it!

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781452092355
Publisher:
AuthorHouse
Publication date:
10/25/2010
Pages:
24
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.06(d)

Read an Excerpt

Roscoe Is a RAKster

You Can Be One Too
By Janice E. Clark

AuthorHouse

Copyright © 2010 Janice E. Clark
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-1-4520-9235-5


Chapter One

RAK held the park gate open for a mother pushing a stroller.

"Why, thank you!" she said as she smiled at him.

RAK took out his notepad. He drew a tally mark beside the words thank you, and he also put one beside smile. Then he joined Nana, who was waiting for him on the green bench.

RAK had gotten his nickname from Nana. She had always said his initials - R. A. K. - meant "random acts of kindness." Whenever he helped someone, she called him a RAKster. She also said anyone could be a RAK.

A RAK could be a boy,
an angel filled with joy,
or maybe a little girl,
wearing bows and curls.

A RAK could be quite tall,
and even very small,
or somewhere kind of in-between;
that would cover all.

Whoever RAK is, RAK does nice things to help out "just because."

One summer day while walking in the park, RAK saw a turtle on its back. He hurried over to help it onto its feet.

Turtle, turtle, upside down,
let me help you flip around.
There you go, my little friend,
free to travel home again.

RAK watched the turtle move forward as fast as it could. He wondered where it was going and what it would do when it got there. Did it have a mother? Or a father? Or a best friend?

RAK liked it when the autumn chill set in and leaves started falling from the trees. He would drag out a big rake and proceed to pull the leaves into a big pile.

Though RAK is small
and his rake is tall,
he helps pile leaves
when it is fall.

Pretty leaves,
piled up high;
do you think
they'll reach the sky?

RAK keeps raking
to help out.
Will he jump in?
Without a doubt.

RAK helps out when winter comes, too. One chilly morning, he discovered that The snow had fallen overnight. RAK arose to see the sight.

The snowflakes still were floating down,
and soon, he could not see the ground.

He grabbed his coat, and gloves, and hat,
and ran outside to make some tracks.
First a circle, then a square -
angels, pictures, everywhere!

Next, he helped Dad clear the walk.
It gave them both some time to talk.
And when they finished piling snow,
RAKs new fort was set to go!

He heard, "Thank you, RAK." Then he felt a big hug. He opened his notepad and drew a tally mark beside thank you and hugs.

RAK visits Nana often. He likes to help her water the plants inside the house.

RAK fills the can
from the sink
and gives each plant
a little drink.

Water and sunlight,
as you might know,
are necessary
for plants to grow.

So RAK helps out
so he can see
how beautiful
the plants will be.

When the chore is done, he draws a tally mark beside thank you, smile and hugs. He shares a snack with Nana, and they plan what they will do next.

Sometimes RAK and Nana walk to the library. On the way, RAK obeys the rules at the crosswalk.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from Roscoe Is a RAKster by Janice E. Clark Copyright © 2010 by Janice E. Clark. Excerpted by permission of AuthorHouse. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Roscoe Is A Rakster 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
FeatheredQuillBookReviews More than 1 year ago
Roscoe Arthur Krueger is a very happy young man. He LOVES helping people, making them smile, and getting hugs. His nana is very proud of him for all the good things that he likes to do. Roscoe has a nickname too. Can you guess what it is? It’s RAK. You might think he got that nickname because those are his initials, but Nana says it is because he is always doing “random acts of kindness.” What a great nickname! As the story opens, RAK is holding a park gate open for a mother who has a baby in a stroller. As the mother walks through the open gate, she smiles, waves to the youngster and thanks him. RAK picks up his notepad and puts a check beneath the words thank you and smile. He likes keeping a tally of his good deeds because it makes him feel good and he knows each RAK brings a smile to the receiver. RAK has so many things to do, usually with his loving Nana by his side. They like to walk to the library (listen to the policeman so you can cross the street safely); at the library RAK reads a book quietly (you don’t want to bother others who are reading); and in the winter, he helps his dad shovel the snowflakes off the walk (Nana stays in the house for this one!). Every time RAK helps out, he brings a smile to somebody’s face. While Roscoe is a RAK, the author explains that anybody can be a RAK. All it takes to hold this special honor is to help somebody else out. How simple is that? You can also keep a notepad like Roscoe and tally up all the smiles, hugs and thanks that you receive. This sweet story is part text, part rhyme and the two blend perfectly to tell this story: One summer day while walking in the park, RAK saw a turtle on its back. He hurried over to help it onto its feet. Turtle, turtle, upside down, let me help you flip around. There you go, my little friend, free to travel home again. In this day and age, when so many children’s books are filled with “don’t do this,” “don’t do that,” or “be careful,” it is nice to read a book with a strong, positive message. The drawings are bright and lively and add a nice upbeat look to the entire book. Put it all together and you have a fun, charming book that will leave a smile on everybody’s face. Quill says: A delightful book full of positive messages about helping others, and the wonderful rewards (hugs, smiles, thanks) that you get from all those RAKs!