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Rose in Bloom
     

Rose in Bloom

4.0 91
by Louisa May Alcott
 

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Three young men stood together on a wharf one bright October day awaiting the arrival of an ocean steamer with an impatience which found a vent in lively skirmishes with a small lad, who pervaded the premises like a will-o'-the-wisp and afforded much amusement to the other groups assembled there.
"They are the Campbells, waiting for their cousin, who has been

Overview

Three young men stood together on a wharf one bright October day awaiting the arrival of an ocean steamer with an impatience which found a vent in lively skirmishes with a small lad, who pervaded the premises like a will-o'-the-wisp and afforded much amusement to the other groups assembled there.
"They are the Campbells, waiting for their cousin, who has been abroad several years with her uncle, the doctor," whispered one lady to another as the handsomest of the young men touched his hat to her as he passed, lugging the boy, whom he had just rescued from a little expedition down among the piles.
"Which is that?" asked the stranger.
"Prince Charlie, as he's called a fine fellow, the most promising of the seven, but a little fast, people say," answered the first speaker with a shake of the head.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781421849805
Publisher:
1st World Publishing
Publication date:
07/25/2013
Pages:
312
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.70(d)

Meet the Author

Louisa May Alcott (November 29, 1832 - March 6, 1888) was an American novelist and poet best known as the author of the novel Little Women (1868) and its sequels Little Men (1871) and Jo's Boys (1886). Raised by her transcendentalist parents, Abigail May and Amos Bronson Alcott in New England, she grew up among many of the well-known intellectuals of the day such as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Henry David Thoreau.

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Rose in Bloom 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 91 reviews.
joJM More than 1 year ago
Rose In Bloom was a great sequel to Eight Cousins which you must read first. I could not put the book down and felt so close to the characters in the book. Of course look at the author it tells you how good this book was.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a good book for people of all ages because it is very clean. Make sure you read Eight Cousins first or you won't understand a thing.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Terrible scan - most words have typos. practically indecipherable.
Elinor_D_Ferrars More than 1 year ago
Rose in Bloom is perhaps my favourite Louisa May Alcott novel. Although it is generally prefered by younger girls, its wholesome sweetness befits it for a girl or woman of any age. One rarely finds such pure, innocent romances nowadays.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I would compare this story the equal to jane eyre. Amore pure and interesting love story could not have been better written, in my opinion and i gladly recommend this little story to young and old alike.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I could not read more than a few pages, if the book was scanned where did the typos come from? If someone typed it, why wasn't it spell checked? Don't bother with this version!!!
Meg_Espey More than 1 year ago
I loved how this book was simply written. It also has good advice even for today. I loved that she ends up with the "right" man. I was hoping he would win her and he does! This is probably my favorite Alcott book next to Little Women.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great, except for the little errors.
InTheBookcase More than 1 year ago
Rose in Bloom is a beautiful gem of a book, penned by the same hand which authored the time-honored novel Little Women. This is the sequel to the charming volume entitled Eight Cousins. A more "grown-up" Rose Campbell returns to her family clan after travelling around the world with her friend Phebe as companion. I love this book because Rose in independent, yet desires to serve others. Suffice it to say, she is a good role model for girls. I found her to be very much selfless. Even though Rose possesses personal wealth, she wishes not to shower herself with glories but to disperse it to those less fortunate. Creating a lifestyle considered progressive for a woman (especially in the 1800s), Rose in blooming into a mature woman of society with tender confidence. Since I cannot describe Miss Rose Campbell as well as the author once did, here's a direct picture of our blossoming heroine: "Not a remarkably gifted girl in any way, and far from perfect; full of all manner of youthful whims and fancies; a little spoiled by much love; rather apt to think all lives as safe and sweet as her own; and, when want or pain appealed to her, the tender heart overflowed with a remorseful charity which gave of its abundance recklessly. Yet, with all her human imperfections, the upright nature of the child kept her desires climbing toward the just and pure and true, as flowers struggle to the light; and the woman's soul was budding beautifully under the green leaves behind the little thorns." (Chapter 3, Rose in Bloom) With her seven male cousins surrounding her, along with the odd assortment of various aunts and uncles, there are many who desire to see Rose grow. They cherish her presence among themselves and attempt to flatter her at every turn. Advances in love flourish as Rose once again settles among the people she knows best in the world. Phebe Moore, Rose's befriended maid, too is experiencing her own way of making it into society -- only through a different course. Her life has always been destined to contrast Rose's, as her place on the social ladder started out on a much lower rung. Quickly she is learning how to climb higher though, and soon wins the heart of a familiar face, without intended design. However, the social implications simply couldn't converge for a winning marriage. So what can a girl do? As usual, Louisa May Alcott has written another charming book. The story contains many good life lessons. As Rose tries life out on her own, sometimes becoming a bit too daring or risky with her choices, she soon makes her way back and settles into routine. In essence, the reader learns much of Victorian idealism and traditions of young adults during that time. I did so enjoy getting to catch glimpses of what all of those Eight Cousins became as they turn into adults. In closing, enjoy some advice on life from dearest cousin, Mac Campbell ("the Worm" was always my favorite of Rose's cousins anyway): "I have my dreams and aspirations, and some of them are pretty high ones. Aim at the best, you know, and keep climbing if you want to get on." (Chapter 2, Rose in Bloom)
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I really am horrified at this book. Why jumble words! I have to delete this from my library, its so bad. L alcott is awesome. Make a more readable copy please.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is such a pure and beautiful book. I would give it five stars accept there are a ton of typos.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She actually has 7 cousins,she is the 8th
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Goldemn oldie
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was finished in 3 days!! I could not put it down rose and phebe are very relatable a perfect book that u can recommende to kids of a young age