Rose's Journal: The Story of a Girl in the Great Depression

Overview

On January 1, 1935, Rose Samuels bids good riddance to a dry, desolate year and begins a new one. The severe drought has left the fields too dry for crops and the farms are all failing. Times are tough, but with hope, love, and determination, Rose and her family manage to turn the year around.
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Rose keeps a journal of her...

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Overview

On January 1, 1935, Rose Samuels bids good riddance to a dry, desolate year and begins a new one. The severe drought has left the fields too dry for crops and the farms are all failing. Times are tough, but with hope, love, and determination, Rose and her family manage to turn the year around.
Includes fun new book-related activities!

Rose keeps a journal of her family's difficult times on their farm during the days of the Dust Bowl in 1935.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Moss has done a fine job in research, and there is quite a bit of historical information packed into this short book."—School Library Journal
From the Publisher

"Moss has done a fine job in research, and there is quite a bit of historical information packed into this short book."--School Library Journal
Publishers Weekly
In this installment of the Young American Voices series set on a Kansas farm, PW wrote, "Rose's pink-lined pages contrast with her handwritten account of dust storms and severe drought. Captioned sketches and historical b&w photographs lend authenticity to this well-researched account." Ages 8-12. (Mar.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Rose Samuels is an eleven-year-old girl growing up in 1930s Kansas and this book is her diary. Every page is creatively adorned with a combination of black-and-white photos, child-like illustrations and comic strips. These pictures, along with the hand-written text, provide a fascinating look at young girl's life during the Great Depression. In spite of her desperate situation, Rose tells her story using matter-of-fact language. She talks of the ongoing drought and the continuous dust storms. All the days are dark and gloomy and the air is thick and heavy with dirt. Rose sleeps with a washcloth over her face to try to keep from ingesting dirt while she sleeps. Some of the townspeople have died from "dust pneumonia." Rose's family has deep roots and they are reluctant to leave their farm and home. Although there are some who say the storms are a sign from God telling them that they should leave, Rose and her family find strength and support from their neighbors. This book is part of the "Young American Voices" series. 2001, Harcourt, $15.00. Ages 8 to 12. Reviewer:Denise Daley
From The Critics
This book depicts the struggle of the Great Depression. A girl on a drought-stricken Kansas farm relates her harsh day-to-day life. "Ms. Moss's powerful style made me really feel what the Great Depression was like," my twelve year-old says. A good gift idea for older children. Part of the "Young American Voices" series. 2001, Harcourt Brace & Company, $15.00. Ages 8 to 12. Reviewer: A. Braga SOURCE: Parent Council, September 2001 (Vol. 9, No. 1)
School Library Journal
Gr 3-5-In her first journal entry, Rose Samuels writes "good riddance" to 1934, and "I sure hope 1935 is a heap better." Unfortunately, it isn't. From month to month, she chronicles events on the family farm in Kansas as well as what is happening across the nation. The Bruno Hauptmann trial is in session, and Amelia Earhart has made her solo flight from Hawaii to California. Jack Benny and George Burns are favorites on the radio, but the Depression is so bad that hot cocoa and custard are foods Rose can only dream of enjoying. On the farm, nothing grows, and the cattle are so skinny that they have "washboard ribs." And there is always the dust. The Samuels come to the brink of losing their land, but at the last minute, they are saved from foreclosure. Moss has done a fine job in research, and there is quite a bit of historical information packed into this short book. However, some of the characters are undeveloped. The text is hand lettered and illustrated with colorful paintings and black-and-white archival photographs. For a child's-eye view of events in U.S. history, including the Depression, try Phillip Hoose's nonfiction title, We Were There, Too (Farrar, 2001). Jerry Stanley's Children of the Dust Bowl (Crown, 1992) is still one of the best titles chronicling the devastation brought by the dust storms and drought.-Roxanne Burg, Thousand Oaks Library, CA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780152046057
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 2/10/2003
  • Series: Young American Voices Series
  • Edition description: First Silver Whistle Paperback Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 56
  • Sales rank: 250,054
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 6.64 (w) x 9.44 (h) x 0.24 (d)

Meet the Author

MARISSA MOSS is best known for her handwritten illustrated journals, including the enormously popular Amelia series. She lives in Berkeley, California.

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 20, 2002

    A sad, but great book!

    This book was very sad but over all it was really good! It's about a girl who is living during the great depression/dustbowl on a farm in Kansas with her family. Their crops aren't doing to well, because of all the thick black dust that is coming down that year so it's hard for Rose and her family to get food. They can't kill their cows, because the cows are too skinny and there isn't enough meat on them for all of Rose's family and her famliy wants to have food to feed every member of her famliy! Despite the sadness and the few rations of food, everything turns right in the end! You will love this book! You have to buy it!

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