Rosie and Buttercup

Rosie and Buttercup

by Chieri Uegaki, Stephane Jorisch
     
 

From the perfectly paired and award-winning creative team who brought you the bestselling Suki's Kimono comes a delightful picture book about two prairie-dog sisters who have difficulty getting along.See more details below

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Overview

From the perfectly paired and award-winning creative team who brought you the bestselling Suki's Kimono comes a delightful picture book about two prairie-dog sisters who have difficulty getting along.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Rosie’s emotions are expressed ... in a thoughtful and gentle way ... Children will want to hear this story more than once ...

Uegaki and Jorisch ... bring poise and polish to a well-worn subject ... Uegaki’s assured text assumes an intelligent reader ... Jorisch’s watercolor illustrations, uncluttered but dense with patterns, are crisp against generous fields of white space ...

... Uegaki’s saucy protagonist and her wry observations will garner fans among young readers, Jorisch’s watercolor illustrations have a quaint feel to them ...This understanding offering is bound to reassure young readers also struggling to adjust to a new sibling.

Publishers Weekly

Uegaki and Jorisch (previously paired for Suki's Kimono) bring poise and polish to a well-worn subject. At first Rosie's perfect life seems even more perfect when little sister Buttercup arrives. Rosie sings and plays with her and teaches her to dance. In time, Rosie becomes disenchanted and gives Buttercup away-to her sitter, Oxford (in a typically fresh touch, Oxford is a middle-aged male). Predictably, she is soon sorry. A few basics are confusing: the well-dressed creatures do not belong to a recognizable species (possibly they are mice, but sans tails), and the passage of time is naggingly unclear-the story seems to unfold over the first months of Buttercup's babyhood, yet she quickly becomes a surefooted toddler. Still, the book's graceful treatment overcomes both uncertainties. Uegaki's assured text assumes an intelligent reader: "One morning, Rosie woke up feeling peevish... a tiny idea that had been smoldering in her head burst into flame"; and offers offbeat images ("Rosie's heart jumped like a poked frog"), which, like her well-chosen details, provoke giggles. Jorisch's watercolor illustrations, uncluttered but dense with patterns, are crisp against generous fields of white space. Flowers and bumblebees loom big from the mouselike perspective; Rosie's colorful toys, clothes and furniture bear cheerful witness to her pleasurable life. Ages 3-7. (Apr.)

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Children's Literature - Monserrat Urena
Rosie was once an only child and she was happy. Then her little sister was born. For a time things were great, then little Buttercup starting getting into Rosie's things. And Rosie decides that she does not want to have Buttercup around anymore. So she takes her sister to see their sitter Oxford. And she leaves Buttercup with him. Happily free, Rosie heads home. She is an only child again, but to her surprise she soon misses her little sister. She rushes back to see Oxford and get her little sister back. There are many picture books that deal with the tensions that come with the arrival of a new sibling. This is by far one of the sweetest. Its sweetness comes not only from the beautiful illustrations but from the faith the author places in Rosie. The only adult figure in the text is Oxford, and his presence in the story is minimal. Rosie is the focus of the story and through her the author shows a great faith in the mental and emotional perceptiveness of children. They can figure things out on their own given time. Rosie does. This is a recommended picture book that is as safe and comforting as a much loved blanket. Reviewer: Monserrat Urena
School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 1- With typical sibling rivalry, Rosie, a rodent, first plays with her baby sister and then gets tired of her and tries to give her away. Luckily, she takes the child to her sitter, a gentle adult male who takes Buttercup in without question and is later willing to trade her back for snack food-sun-dried dandelion puffs. Rosie's emotions are expressed through her activities and actions in a thoughtful and gentle way. No reprimands are given, and the sisters are happily reunited in a resolved relationship. The pretty watercolors are delicately displayed and have touches of ribbons and flowers. The white backgrounds make the colors and characters stand out. Children will want to hear this story more than once; it is a good choice for those who are faced with accepting a newcomer in the family.-Erlene Bishop Killeen, Stroughton Area School District, WI

Kirkus Reviews
Rosie is supremely satisfied with her perfectly ordered life. Even the arrival of her baby sister Buttercup initially appears to fit seamlessly into Rosie's plans-after all, every budding ballerina enjoys having an understudy. However, as Buttercup becomes increasingly mobile, Rosie's tidy life begins to unravel and her enthrallment with Buttercup begins to wane. This leads to her precipitous decision to give her sister to a friendly neighbor. Uegaki's tale travels the familiar ground of older-sibling angst. While the resolution-a remorseful Rosie trades her favorite snack to get Buttercup back-is no surprise, Uegaki's saucy protagonist and her wry observations will garner fans among young readers. Jorisch's watercolor illustrations have a quaint feel to them that suits the easygoing tenor of the tale. This understanding offering is bound to reassure young readers also struggling to adjust to a new sibling. (Picture Book. 3-7)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781553379973
Publisher:
Kids Can Press, Limited
Publication date:
03/28/2008
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 10.00(d)
Lexile:
AD740L (what's this?)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

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