Rosie and Michael

Rosie and Michael

5.0 1
by Judith Viorst, Lorna Tomei
     
 

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Rosie likes Michael when he's dopey and not just when he's smart. Michael likes Rosie when she's grouchy and not just when she's nice. That's how friends are. When Michael's parakeet died, he called Rosie. When Rosie's dog ran away, she called Michael. That's what friends do. Michael once sprayed Kool Whip into Rosie's sneakers. Rosie once put a worm in Michael's

Overview

Rosie likes Michael when he's dopey and not just when he's smart. Michael likes Rosie when she's grouchy and not just when she's nice. That's how friends are. When Michael's parakeet died, he called Rosie. When Rosie's dog ran away, she called Michael. That's what friends do. Michael once sprayed Kool Whip into Rosie's sneakers. Rosie once put a worm in Michael's sandwich. They're still friends. And Michael says he would never have his tonsils out without Rosie. And Rosie says she would never move to China without Michael. And the reason they wouldn't is — because they're friends.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Eileen Hanning
Rosie and Michael are true-blue, deep-down, special friends. They do more than just play together, they tease each other, confide in each other, and truly understand each other. Judith Viorst again shows her knack for telling it like it is when it comes to childhood and relationships. All too often children's books about friendship are saccharin and shallow-depicting only the "nice" side of friendship. Rosie and Michael, on the other hand, demonstrates how true friends support and understand each other even when they are dopey, grouchy, smelly, or sad. Viorst emphasizes the role of acceptance and especially forgiveness in a long-lasting friendship. Michael puts Kool Whip in Rosie's shoes, and Rosie lets the air out of Michael's basketball, but they are still friends. Written in the first person, Michael and Rosie alternately describe their relationship with the other, and explore the nature of their friendship in real and imaginary situations. Each knows he or she would be forgiven for breaking a confidence if quicksand or piranhas were involved. Both vow to defend the other from false accusations and know the other would try to save them from lions or tidal waves. The genuine language and detailed pen and ink illustrations remain fresh and engaging, even after more than twenty years. This timeless picture book celebrates friendship through lost dogs, swiped bikes, and thick and thin. 1998 (orig.
Children's Literature - Deborah Palgon
Judith Viorst's humorous book is about friends-not just ordinary friends, but best friends. Rosie likes Michael even when he's dopey and understands his fear of pythons. Michael likes Rosie even when she's grouchy and understands her fear of werewolves. Michael and Rosie are best friends in spite of the funny names they call each other and in spite of the practical jokes they play on each other. Light-hearted and humorous, this book addresses what makes some friendships particularly special. Although the publisher's suggested age level is 6 to 9, some of the examples and images might be too horrific for the younger or highly sensitive child.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780689712722
Publisher:
Atheneum Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
01/01/1998
Edition description:
Reissue
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
608,885
Product dimensions:
7.80(w) x 10.30(h) x 0.10(d)
Lexile:
AD740L (what's this?)
Age Range:
6 - 9 Years

Meet the Author

Judith Viorst was born and brought up in New Jersey, graduated from Rutgers University, moved to Greenwich Village, and has lived in Washington, DC, since 1960, when she married Milton Viorst, a political writer. They have three sons and seven grandchildren. A graduate in 1981 of the Washington Psychoanalytic Institute, Viorst writes in many different areas: science books, children’s chapter and picture books—including the beloved Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day, which has sold some four million copies—adult fiction and nonfiction—including the New York Times bestseller, Necessary Losses—poetry for children and adults, and four musicals. Her most recent book of poetry for adults, Wait For Me and Other Poems About the Irritations and Consolations of a Long Marriage, was published by Simon & Schuster in 2015. Her most recent book of poetry for children, What Are You Glad About? What Are You Mad About? was published in 2016 by Atheneum/Caitlyn Dlouhy Books.

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Rosie and Michael 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I first read this book when I was 7. It continued to be a favorite throughout elementary school for me, but when I went to middle school, I forgot about the book. Recently I have been trying to compile a list of favorite books from my childhood, and this one tops the list. It's what every one wants in a friend, and I highly recommend it to all ages!