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Rosie Sprout's Time to Shine

( 3 )

Overview

Violet runs the fastest, sings the highest, looks the fanciest, and talks the loudest. Everyone agrees that she's the best.

Except Rosie. Rosie isn't fast, or loud, or fancy, but she's tired of hearing that Violet is the best.

When their class grows pea plants, Rosie's and Violet's are the first to sprout! But Violet's is a little taller. So Rosie pushes some soil over Violet's sprout to slow it down. And for ...

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Overview

Violet runs the fastest, sings the highest, looks the fanciest, and talks the loudest. Everyone agrees that she's the best.

Except Rosie. Rosie isn't fast, or loud, or fancy, but she's tired of hearing that Violet is the best.

When their class grows pea plants, Rosie's and Violet's are the first to sprout! But Violet's is a little taller. So Rosie pushes some soil over Violet's sprout to slow it down. And for a moment, Rosie's plant is the best—but she feels terrible. And she feels even worse when she learns that Violet has the chicken pox.

So for the next two weeks, Rosie waters her plant—and Violet's too. She turns them in the sun, and sings them quiet growing songs. And her teacher says that Rosie is the best gardener she's ever had. Definitely the best.

This empathetic story captures every child's desire to be noticed and praised, and the subtle competitions that go on in a classroom. It's a book to swell every shy child's heart.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Rosie’s classmate Violet has what is charitably known as a strong personality. “She was the loudest storyteller at lunchtime. And she looked the fanciest on picture day,” writes Wortche, in an accomplished debut. “Violet was definitely the best. And everyone agreed. Except Rosie.” Matters come to a head when everyone in class has to grow a pea plant; Rosie approaches the assignment with geeky devotion, while Violet sees it as one more opportunity to hog the spotlight. In the pages that follow, Rosie discovers just how much Violet has gotten under her skin, but she also learns that she’s on the radar of someone who really matters. In lesser hands, this could be just another life lesson, but Wortche possesses both a refreshing directness and a willingness to trust her readers. She also has the courage to conclude not with reconciliation, but with a bittersweet and profoundly wise acknowledgment that it takes all kinds. This impressive new author is well served by Barton (Mine!), whose digital classroom sketches convey a tumult of emotion and have just the right amounts of energy and vulnerability. Ages 5–9. (Dec.)
Kirkus Reviews
Rosie is pretty secure in her own skin, but, just once, she wants to be better than her classmate Violet at something. Violet runs fastest, sings highest, tells the loudest stories and looks fanciest. When Rosie tires of Violet's perfection, her jealousy gets the best of her. Competition tightens when both girls' pea plants sprout at the same time, but Violet loudly claims the sprouting crown. Rose can't take it anymore and heaps soil on Violet's sprout, claiming her pea plant to be the best. Her happiness doesn't last long. When her conscience nags at her and Violet comes down with a case of chicken pox, Rosie does what she needs to do to both salve her conscience and keep Violet's plant alive. Readers will wonder why "everyone" allows Violet her reign of perfection--the sunny, digitally created watercolor illustrations show a self-congratulatory little braggart who never thinks about others. Rosie, who is a perfectly wonderful little girl, does learn to be kinder (or at least not to sabotage a classmate's project), but the ending doesn't satisfy, and the lesson feels muddled. Rosie works hard to grow two great plants, but Violet can barely acknowledge the effort. Only Rosie and the strangely disengaged teacher, Ms. Willis, seem to know how much work Rosie did. A confusing, if visually attractive offering. (Picture book. 5-8)
From the Publisher
Starred Review, Publishers Weekly, October 24, 2011:
"...Wortche possesses both a refreshing directness and a willingness to trust her readers. She also has the courage to conclude not with reconciliation, but with a bittersweet and profoundly wise acknowledgment that it takes all kinds. This impressive new author is well served by Barton (Mine!), whose digital classroom sketches convey a tumult of emotion and have just the right amounts of energy and vulnerability."
Children's Literature - Vicki Foote
Everyone in Rosie's class, including Violet, thinks that Violet is the best in everything, but Rosie doesn't agree. Rosie sees how the other kids think that Violet is the fastest in gym class, sings the highest in choir practice, and looks the fanciest on picture day. Rosie is not as good at all these things, and she is tired of hearing about Violet. When the teacher, Ms. Willis, tells them that they will each be growing their own pea plants, Violet is excited because she knows that her plant will be the tallest of them all. They decorate their pots, and learn how plants all need air, soil, water, and sunlight. One day Rosie is at school early and decides to cover up the sprouting tip of Violet's plant. Rosie finds out that Violet is sick with the chicken pox and begins to feel guilty. She takes care of both plants while Violet is gone. Both plants grow tall and healthy. Ms. Willis tells Rosie that she is the best gardener that she's ever had in class. When Violet gets back and finds out about the plants, she thanks Rosie but still says that her own decoration on the pot is the best. Ms. Willis and Rosie smile at each other. Children will recognize this type of behavior and enjoy the pleasant resolution. The adorable illustrations are interesting and amusing. The story has educational value, both in learning about character and a sideline of learning about plants. It's a good book to read aloud to preschoolers and for older children to read independently. Reviewer: Vicki Foote
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—Rosie isn't the fastest runner, or the best singer, or the fanciest dressed for picture day. Those superlatives, and more, belong to Violet. Everyone in the class supports her bigger—and better—personality. Everyone except Rosie. When the two girls' pea plants are the first to sprout, Violet barges ahead and declares hers the best. Jealous, Rosie covers Violet's sprout with dirt. When Violet comes down with chicken pox, Rosie, feeling guilty, cares for her sprout as well as her own. Both plants flourish—and Rosie proves that she is definitely the best gardener. When Violet returns, she is taken aback to find herself on equal ground with Rosie and thanks her before focusing on areas where she is the best. Many children will relate to Rosie's feelings of jealousy and desire to be the best at something. The story would also be useful for the Violets of the world, who may not realize how their bragging affects others. With sweet, soft illustrations full of details that complement the text, Rosie and her diverse class of pink-cheeked friends are full of appeal. A solid addition.—Anna Haase Krueger, Antigo Public Library, WI
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780375867217
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 12/13/2011
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 419,075
  • Age range: 5 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.70 (w) x 11.20 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

ALLISON WORTCHE is a graduate of the College of William & Mary and works as an editor of children's books in New York City, where she lives. This is her first picture book.

PATRICE BARTON earned a BFA in studio art from the University of Texas in Austin, where she lives with her husband and son. Her previous books include Sweet Moon Baby written by Karen Henry Clark and Mine! by Shutta Crum.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 3 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2013

    Sweet story for young kids- check it out!

    This is a sweet story about a young girl's talent. Another classmate overshadows everyone in the class...until that little girl misses class, and Rosie gets to shine. It's nice to see a story about the 'average' child's hidden talents and it is a boost to all children that even though one child in class may seem to be the best at 'everything', each child is truly special at something. That is a true cause for celebration!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 31, 2011

    A must-read, must-have classroom favorite!

    This is a terrific children's book! It is beautifully written, and the adorable pictures compliment the text perfectly. Rosie Sprout will be a favorite in any child's book collection and is a favorite in my classroom already. It is a marvelous piece of literature that I will use each year, whether I am using it to introduce my plants & seeds science unit, as a basis for a character ed lesson, or as a focus for one of my reading lessons. Love this book and am looking forward to more from this fabulous author!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews

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