Rosie the Riveter: Women Working on the Homefront in World War II

Rosie the Riveter: Women Working on the Homefront in World War II

by Penny Coleman, Penny Colman
     
 
Illustrated with black-and-white photographs. When America's men went off to war in 1942, millions of women were recruited, through posters and other propaganda, to work at non-traditional jobs. In defense plants, factories, offices, and everywhere else workers were needed, they were—for the first time—well paid and financially independent. But eventually

Overview

Illustrated with black-and-white photographs. When America's men went off to war in 1942, millions of women were recruited, through posters and other propaganda, to work at non-traditional jobs. In defense plants, factories, offices, and everywhere else workers were needed, they were—for the first time—well paid and financially independent. But eventually the war ended, and the government and industries that had once persuaded them to work for the war effort now instructed them to return home and take care of their husbands and children. Based on interviews and original research by noted historian Penny Colman, Rosie the Riveter shows young readers how women fought World War II from the home front.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This WWII history of the over 18 million women serving in the labor force includes first-hand accounts, propaganda posters and numerous period photographs. "The author explain[s] the events surrounding the war and the economic conditions that temporarily produced a female-dominated work force," said PW. Ages 10-up. (Feb.)r
Children's Literature - Marilyn Bagel
In 1943, while America's fighting men were on the front lines in World War II, millions of the nation's women valiantly filled vital defense and civilian jobs, from riveting airplane parts and reconditioning machine gears to driving buses and becoming police officers. This is their story; it is a saga of the homefires they kept burning for the war effort while they simultaneously secured the very fabric of American society. It explores how women chose their jobs, the pride they felt for their mighty contributions and how the experience changed their lives forever. The book's illuminating text combined with more than 60 archival black and white photographs, famous posters and ads makes it a must for home and school libraries.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 6-9Colman chronicles the drive to get women to enter wartime industries, providing insight into the federal government's propaganda campaign and incentives. She also supplies the facts and figures: many more women than one might suppose had full-time employment before the war, and many continued to work after it, sometimes in positions that were considerably less important and less lucrative. The author also discusses the sexual harassment and racial discrimination women experienced while doing their patriotic duty. The compromises they had to make in order to manage child care and to prove to men on the job that they were their equals are frequently ignored in other historical treatments of the Rosie-the-riveter phenomenon. From Colman's point of view, the experiences of stateside workers led the way to some of the more liberal reforms later in the century, especially for women and minorities. The abundant black-and-white photographs included are a real treat. An excellent addition.Ruth K. MacDonald, Bay Path College, Longmeadow, MA
Stephanie Zvirin
Readers picking this up for a biography assignment will be in for a surprise. The muscular, red-haired woman presented so formidably on the jacket (it's a reproduction of a Norman Rockwell painting) represents many women, not just one. What Colman actually offers is a solid overview of the role women played in the wartime workplace. Black-and-white photos, including many posed public relations shots, and quoted material drawn from magazines of the period lend a wonderful flavor to the portrait of stateside World War II America. Colman looks at the jobs women took, the impact women had on the workplace, and what happened to working women at war's end, but what's most interesting is her discussion of the public relations campaign that not only "wooed" women into the workplace, but also sought to change firmly entrenched attitudes about women's role in society. A chronology and an extensive bibliography are appended.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780517597910
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
03/01/1995
Edition description:
1st ed
Pages:
128
Product dimensions:
8.31(w) x 9.60(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range:
10 - 14 Years

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