Rosie's Roses

Rosie's Roses

by Pamela Duncan Edwards, Henry Cole
     
 

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As is a present for Aunt Ruth's birthday, Rosie Raccoon is determined to offer four roses tied with a rainbow ribbon. As she and her big brother, Robert, ramble through the forest toward Aunt Ruth's house, Rosie's flowers mysteriously disappear, rose by rose. Is there a rose robber in the forest?

In this lighthearted alliterative romp — written especially

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Overview

As is a present for Aunt Ruth's birthday, Rosie Raccoon is determined to offer four roses tied with a rainbow ribbon. As she and her big brother, Robert, ramble through the forest toward Aunt Ruth's house, Rosie's flowers mysteriously disappear, rose by rose. Is there a rose robber in the forest?

In this lighthearted alliterative romp — written especially for fans of the letter R — Pamela Duncan Edwards and Henry Cole tell the story of a little raccoon who discovers that sharing with others brings its own rewards.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In another alliterative adventure, Edwards and Cole (previously paired for Some Smug Slug) send winsome Rosie Raccoon on a mission: to deliver four roses, tied with a rainbow ribbon, to Aunt Ruth. One by one, the roses are carried off by other forest inhabitants. Mrs. Robin's a rascal, roared Rosie, reads a typical R-studded passage. She'd better return my rose right away. But each time Rosie tracks down a missing rose, she ends up sympathizing with the thief's good intentions. Mrs. Robin, for example, gives the red rose to cheer up her husband, ravaged by raging strep throat. You're my prize rose, Rosie, says Aunt Ruth upon learning of her niece's inadvertent largesse. The story lacks the sly wit of its predecessors, and the concept falters when the final rose recipient is a Miss Squirrel instead of another animal. But Cole's watercolors have a cheery verve, and he embellishes his elegant portrayals of animal homes with soupAons of humor (Mrs. Robin has adorned her tree with frilly curtains). As in previous books, Cole hides the featured letter in every picture, a tried-and-true diversion. Novices in letter recognition should find this a rollicking read. Ages 3-6. (Apr.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
In this celebration of the 18th letter of the alphabet, we join Rosie and her brother Robert as they set off to deliver a birthday present of four roses tied with a rainbow ribbon to their Aunt Ruth. They pause to play along the way and one by one, Rosie's roses begin to disappear. The orange rose is tracked down to Mr. Rat, who really needs it to make his room smell fresh, the purple goes to Mr. Rabbit to give to his wife, the red to Mrs. Robin to cheer up her sick husband and the cream colored rose adorns Squirrel's bridal headdress. Rosie and Robert arrive at Aunt Ruth's with only the rainbow ribbon to give her. Aunt Ruth reassures Rosie that she is the only prize rose Aunt Ruth needs. Edwards' sweet story is a showcase for family love, generosity and caring. Primary teachers will appreciate the wide variety of r words, "rodent is a rouge" "rabbit's a rapscallion" and "robin's a rascal" while the alliteration has great appeal for a read-aloud. The illustrations are bright and simple with just the right amount of detail; in rabbit's home we see a sign that reads, "Warren Sweet Warren." Cole also challenges readers to find the letter R hidden in each illustration. A lovely book, lovely story, lovely read-aloud. 2003, HarperCollins,
— Sharon Oliver
Kirkus Reviews
Having done with the letters C, F, and S, Edwards and Cole offer an alliterative run of R to cheer a story of graceful, if unintentional, gift-giving. Rosie the raccoon and her brother Robert are on their way to their Aunt Ruth's house. Rosie has a clutch of four roses to give her aunt. As they ramble along, Rosie notices she is missing one. Robert thinks perhaps the rat they just passed might have picked it up. Indeed he has-"Rogue," cries Rosie-but she also notices that it lights up his dank quarters, so she leaves it as a gift. As the two gambol their way to Aunt Ruth's, they manage to drop all the roses, and all the roses are picked up by deserving souls: a robin bringing some gaiety to her sick husband, a rabbit offering balm to his frazzled wife, a bride about to be married without a garland for her hair. Rosie will call them rapscallions and rascals before she learns the situation. So sweet a soul is Rosie, that readers will agree with Aunt Ruth when she tells Rosie, "you're my prize rose." A sensitive little tale that teaches by clear example, kept on the light side with Cole's gladdening artwork and all those repeat letters: if it isn't "rowdy rabbit children romping everywhere," it's "a rumor that Mr. Robin has raging strep throat." Really rewarding. (Picture book. 3-6)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060289980
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
03/07/2003
Edition description:
1ST
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.00(w) x 8.75(h) x 0.25(d)
Age Range:
5 - 6 Years

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