Rostropovich:The Musical Life of the Great Cellist, Teacher, and Legend

Hardcover (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $12.79
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 63%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (11) from $12.79   
  • New (5) from $21.16   
  • Used (6) from $12.79   

Overview

When renowned cellist Mstislav Rostropovich died less than a year ago at the age of eighty, the world lost not only an extraordinary musician but an accomplished conductor, an outsize personality, and a courageous human being. "It is not an exaggeration to say that the history of the cello in the twentieth century would be unthinkable without the name of Mstislav Rostropovich," writes Elizabeth Wilson. "He has seemed to me like a personification of the cello itself." Ms. Wilson, a former student of "Slava" and the acclaimed biographer of both Shostakovich and Jacqueline du Pré, has written the definitive biography of the master. Rostropovich teems with entertaining anecdotes and therefore brings the reader as close as one can get to the method and psychology of Rostropovich's playing and teaching.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Forecast
Comprehensive biography of the late cellist brings together personal anecdotes and important insights into the larger-than-life musician.
Russian Life
Rich portrait of the artistic hothouse that encased Russia's postwar music world....Tale is lovingly told.
Midwest Book Review
A definitive and in-depth biography.
The Washington Times
[Wilson] knows her music…This is an extraordinary book about the musical and cultural environment in the Soviet Union that produced Mr. Rostropovich …. [Wilson's] thorough research makes this biography an encyclopedia of an era.
Strings - Graham Pellettieri
Will help readers understand his teaching methods and playing psychology.
Review Of Higher Education - Michael Dirda
Readers will be persuaded that Mstislav Rostopovich was every bit as grand and wonderful and humane as [Wilson] portrays him.
Booklist - Alan Hirsch
Loving biography of a warm, caring teacher, performer, and family man who will long be remembered for...his music.
The Washington Times - Priscilla S. Taylor
This is an extraordinary book about the musical and cultural environment in the Soviet Union that produced Mr. Rostropovich.
The Buffalo News - Kenneth Young
Part memoir, part history...has a researcher's diligence mixed with an unapologetic personal touch and an artist's idealism.
The Whole Note, (Www.Thewholenote.Com) - Pamela Margles
A fitting tribute to the greatest cellist of his time.
June 2008 CHOICE
Wilson thoroughly examines Rostropovich's rapid rise as a performer and prize winner, his career as a teacher at the Moscow Conservatory where she was his student (1964-71), his association with many leading composers of his time and the resulting significant enlargement of the cello repertory, and his ardent defense of artistic and intellectual freedom...The book's strongest feature is the author's treatment of Rostropovich the teacher....Recommended.
June 2008 Choice
Wilson thoroughly examines Rostropovich's rapid rise as a performer and prize winner, his career as a teacher at the Moscow Conservatory where she was his student (1964-71), his association with many leading composers of his time and the resulting significant enlargement of the cello repertory, and his ardent defense of artistic and intellectual freedom...The book's strongest feature is the author's treatment of Rostropovich the teacher....Recommended.
The Washington Times
This is an extraordinary book about the musical and cultural environment in the Soviet Union that produced Mr. Rostropovich.
—Priscilla S. Taylor
Michael Dirda
Some might fault Elizabeth Wilson's Rostropovich as being too reverential, at times even hagiographical. But most readers will be persuaded that Mstislav Rostropovich was every bit as grand and wonderful and humane as she portrays him. When the cellist sent his graduate students out into the world, he would invariably beg them, "Please do not forget the work we did together." How could they? He was clearly as unforgettable in the classroom as he was at the Kennedy Center…
—The Washington Post
Publishers Weekly

London-based cellist Wilson, author of Shostakovichand Jacqueline du Pré, studied with acclaimed cellist and conductor Mstislav Rostropovich (1927-2007) at the Moscow State Conservatory from 1964 to 1971. Noting that the Russian-born Rostropovich dominated the international concert scene for more than half a century, she adds, "For nearly as long as this, he has seemed to me like a personification of the cello itself." Her key source is Rostropovich, as she interviewed him in nine cities across Europe over a span of 10 years. Writing with an exacting precision and exhaustive research, she has succeeded in documenting all aspects of his life as a musician and teacher in meticulous detail, taking the reader on a soaring journey that highlights his days with Britten, du Pré ("a voyage of discovery by equal masters, an inspired dialogue between two extraordinary artists"), Prokofiev and Shostakovich. Other chapters cover his influence and teaching methods and include an insightful analysis of the "metaphysical aspect of sound" in his music. With arpeggios of anecdotes punctuating her personal memories, Wilson has composed a symphony of sentences, a definitive portrait of the master cellist certain to be greeted with a crescendo of applause from both book lovers and music lovers. 40 b&w photos. (Jan. 4)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Choice
. . . Wilson thoroughly examines Rostropovich's rapid rise as a performer and prize winner, his career as a teacher at the Moscow Conservatory where she was his student (1964-71), his association with many leading composers of his time and the resulting significant enlargement of the cello repertory, and his ardent defense of artistic and intellectual freedom . . . The book's strongest feature is the author's treatment of Rostropovich the teacher.
Library Journal

Mstislav Rostropovich, a legendary musician of the 20th century, died just a month after the English edition of this book was published in April 2007. Wilson, a British author and former student of Rostropovich, gained access to a great deal of archival information about his years as a faculty member at the Moscow State Conservatory. The book proceeds chronologically through Rostropovich's life and career, with several interpolated chapters devoted to reminiscences from other former pupils. Wilson explores Rostropovich's teaching philosophies and methods and details his warm relationships with several leading composers of the day, notably Benjamin Britten and Dmitry Shostakovich. Unfortunately, Wilson ends her narrative in 1974, the year of Rostropovich's forced departure from the Soviet Union. She acknowledges that a study of the remaining 33 years of his life-during which he was principal conductor of the National Symphony Orchestra in Washington, DC, and taught and performed around the globe-could fill several volumes, and one hopes that she will rise to the challenge of completing the biography of this great musician, humanist, and pedagog. Recommended for all music collections.
—Larry Lipkis

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781566637763
  • Publisher: Dee, Ivan R. Publisher
  • Publication date: 1/25/2008
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 416
  • Sales rank: 806,399
  • Product dimensions: 6.66 (w) x 9.57 (h) x 1.38 (d)

Meet the Author

Elizabeth Wilson studied at the Moscow State Conservatory with Mstislav Rostropovich between 1964 and 1971. She has also written Shostakovich: A Life Remembered and Jacqueline du Pre. She lives in Italy.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents


Illustrations     ix
Preface     xiii
Acknowledgments     xvii
Notes on the text     xix
Introduction: A perspective on the Russian school of cello-playing     1
Beginnings     13
Studies at the Moscow Conservatoire     26
The start of a performing career     41
The young teacher     55
Contacts with composers I: from Gliere to Prokofiev     64
Establishing new performance standards (1952-62)     79
An independent teacher     104
Contacts with composers II: Shostakovich and his successors     125
Natalya Shakhovskaya     141
Popularizing the cello     148
Aleksandr Knaifel     171
The early 1960s     178
Natalya Gutman     206
Teaching principles: Class 19 in the 1960s     211
Karine Georgian     235
Principles of interpretation     242
Victoria Yagling     269
The late 1960s     279
Ivan Monighetti     302
The final years in the Soviet Union     313
Epilogue     343
Rostropovich's cello students, 1947-74     351
Letter from Rostropovich to anumber of Russian newspapers     354
List of sources     359
Index     363
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)