The Rough-Face Girl

( 14 )

Overview

In an Algonquin village by the shores of Lake Ontario, many young women have tried to win the affections of the powerful Invisible Being who lives with his sister in a great wigwam near the forest. Then came the Rough-Face girl, scarred from working by the fire. Can she succeed where her beautiful, cruel sisters have failed? "A strong, distinctive tale with art to match."—Kirkus Reviews, pointer review "The drama of the haunting illustrations-and of Martin's respectful retelling-produce an affecting ...

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Overview

In an Algonquin village by the shores of Lake Ontario, many young women have tried to win the affections of the powerful Invisible Being who lives with his sister in a great wigwam near the forest. Then came the Rough-Face girl, scarred from working by the fire. Can she succeed where her beautiful, cruel sisters have failed? "A strong, distinctive tale with art to match."—Kirkus Reviews, pointer review "The drama of the haunting illustrations-and of Martin's respectful retelling-produce an affecting work."—Publishers Weekly Rafe Martin lives in Rochester, NY. David Shannon lives in southern California.

In this Algonquin Indian version of the Cinderella story, the Rough-Face Girl and her two beautiful but heartless sisters compete for the affections of the Invisible Being.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In this Algonquin Indian version of the Cinderella story, two domineering sisters set out to marry the ``rich, powerful, and supposedly handsome'' Invisible Being, first having to prove that they can see him. They cannot, but their mistreated younger sister the Rough-Face Girl--so called because the sparks from the fire have scarred her skin--can, for she sees his ``sweet yet awesome face'' all around her. He then appears to her, reveals her true hidden beauty and marries her. Shannon ( How Many Spots Does a Leopard Have? ) paints powerful, stylized figures and stirring landscapes, heightening their impact with varied use of mist, shadows and darkness. His meticulous research is evident in intricate details of native dress and lodging. In places, though, he struggles with the paradox of illustrating the invisible--an eagle, tree, cloud and rainbow form the face of the Invisible Being in one disappointingly banal image. For the most part, however, the drama of these haunting illustrations--and of Martin's ( Foolish Rabbit's Big Mistake ) respectful retelling--produce an affecting work. Ages 4-8. (Apr.)
Children's Literature - Debra Briatico
In this Algonquin Indian tale, the Rough-Face Girl is scarred from years of tending the fire for her family. She is mistreated by her sisters, who go on a journey to find and marry the Invisible Being. The Rough-Face Girl desires to meet this mysterious power and decides to embark on her own search. When she meets up with the sister of the Invisible Being, she is put through a test. After she answers all of the questions correctly, she bathes in the lake. While in the water, her scars vanish and she ends up marrying the Invisible Being. Magnificent paintings and moving prose perfectly capture the beauty of the natural world in this Native American version of Cinderella.
School Library Journal
Gr 3 Up-- Simply, in the words of an oral storyteller, Martin retells an Algonquin folktale. The youngest of three sisters is forced by the other two to sit by the fire and feed the flames, which results in the burning and scarring of her hair and skin. Desirous of marriage to an Invisible Being who lives in a huge wigwam across the village, these cruel siblings must prove to his sister that they have seen him, but they fail. The Rough-Face Girl, however, sees the Invisible Being everywhere and can answer his sister's questions correctly. Comparable in presentation to Caroline Cunningham's ``The Little Scarred One'' from The Talking Stone (Knopf, 1939; o.p.; reprinted in Castles and Dragons , Crowell, 1958; o.p.), but different in detail, this is a splendid read-aloud. It is the only single illustrated version available. Shannon's finely crafted full- and double-page acrylic paintings in the rich hues of the earth embody the full flavor of the story. His stunning cover portrait shows at one glance both the girl's beauty and her frightful scars. Another in the recent succession of Cinderella stories, The Rough-Face Girl begs for comparison with Princess Furball (Greenwillow, 1989), Tattercoats (Putnam, 1989), Mufaro's Beautiful Daughters (Lothrop, 1987), Moss Gown (Clarion, 1987), etc., and will provide both entertainment and a cultural lesson.-- Susan Scheps, Shaker Heights Public Library, OH
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780698116269
  • Publisher: Penguin Young Readers Group
  • Publication date: 4/28/1998
  • Edition description: Reissue
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 51,745
  • Age range: 5 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.03 (w) x 9.57 (h) x 0.10 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 14 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 14 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 9, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Great Story!

    This is a great story. I use this is my classroom as a compare and contrast writing activity with Cinderella. In this Native American version, the Rough-Face Girl and her sisters compete for the affections of the Invisible Being. Where her sisters fail, the Rough-Face Girls beauty shines through. The artwork is also beautiful.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2001

    Rough Face Girl Marries Invisible Man

    Cinderella`s two older sisters try to be better than Cinderella and the sisters are not kind to her.One day Cinderella got an invitation to see an invisible man.The sisters would not let Cinderella go, so the sisters dressed up and went.There was a test to see if you could see the invisible man and the sisters failed it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 10, 2013

    I remember finding this book when I was about 5 or 6 years old.

    I remember finding this book when I was about 5 or 6 years old. I'm 25 now and have never forgotten the story or how beautiful the illustrations were. This is a great adaptation of Cinderella with elements of "The Ugly Duckling". I highly recommend it.

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  • Posted July 13, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    The Rough-Face Girl an cinderella tale. In a small Indian villa

    The Rough-Face Girl an cinderella tale.
    In a small Indian village by Lake Ontario there was a humongous wigwam and in this wigwam lived a wealthy, handsome Invisible Being and his sister. Every single woman in the village wanted to marry the Invisible Being because of his great wealth.

    Also in this village lived a poor man and his three daughters. Two of the daughters were very self-centered and made the third daughter do the chore of tending the fire. From tending the fire the young woman had burns and scars all over her hands, arms and face because of sparks flying up and on her. Her sisters teased her and called her Rough-Face Girl.

    One day the two sisters dressed up in the finest their father could provide and they went to seek out the invisible being to become his bride. But they first had to answer his sisters questions correctly.

    The third sister has faith that she will marry the Invisible One. So she dresses in what little her father has to offer, which was far less than her sister had.

    Which of the young women do you think the handsome Invisible One should choose? Why?

    This is a different twist on the Cinderella tale that we all know well. The story in this book is an Algonquin Indian Cinderella tale.

    I enjoyed this story with the Rough-Face Girl. Most people only saw her scars and had no idea what beauty she held within.

    How many times have you looked at someone and not wanted to be their friend just because of their outer appearance?

    I highly recommend this book for ages 8 and up.

    This book was a personal choice to share.

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  • Posted July 20, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Such a great book!!

    This was one of my all time favorite picture books growing up. It's about a native american girl whos face had been scarred from fire and ashes. With the help of the mother spirit thing (it's been a while...) she's able to marry the son of the chief (prince). Its such a beutiful story and I absolutely love it!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2007

    really good cinderella story

    I got this book when I was in the 3rd grade. And now Im 19. It gives a really good imagination for kids. My little sister loves it. ONe of the best cinderella stories ever

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2002

    My All-The-Time Favorite Storyteller!

    This is my all-the-time favorite storyteller because it is like from the story in Cinderella. However, it is very much different and unique to tell about the poor Rough-Face Girl. Something is so special about the poor Rough-Face Girl whom she met the mysterious man who saw her something differently than her two snobbish, meanest sisters. That storyteller really excites me every time I read, and even I read to my niece and students!!! They love it very much as I do! I still keep the book since I was in high school :)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2002

    'All about the Rough Face Girl '

    I read this great book! I like it because it has a good lesson that says just because you arn't the prettiest, and the richest you can still be very kind and nice to others.Read this different Cinderella book to find out what happens in this story.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2002

    Native American Cinderella

    Rough Face Girl is about a Native American girl whose older sisters hurt her and make fun of her. The two older girls are looking for an invisible King, but instead the rough face girl finds him and marries him.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 13, 2009

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    Posted May 22, 2011

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    Posted October 25, 2008

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    Posted September 8, 2009

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    Posted November 16, 2009

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