Rough Guide to Shopping with a Conscience

Rough Guide to Shopping with a Conscience

5.0 1
by Duncan Clark, Richie Unterberger
     
 
Sweatshops, fair trade, climate change, ethical investment, organic food ... shopping can sometimes feel like a moral minefield. Which companies and products should we support or avoid? And which claims of social responsibility can we trust? The Rough Guide to Shopping with a Conscience cuts through the greenwash to answer these and many other questions. The Issues Do

Overview

Sweatshops, fair trade, climate change, ethical investment, organic food ... shopping can sometimes feel like a moral minefield. Which companies and products should we support or avoid? And which claims of social responsibility can we trust? The Rough Guide to Shopping with a Conscience cuts through the greenwash to answer these and many other questions. The Issues Do boycotts work? Is buying local better? How can we reduce our impact on global warming? The Products From coffee to cars, fish to furniture, pensions to plane tickets - the problems and the ethical options. The Companies Where to shop and what to look for in food, clothes, banks, travel agencies and much more. Packed full of information and with tips on how to do your own research, The Rough Guide to Shopping with a Conscience is the essential handbook for responsible consumers.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781843537243
Publisher:
DK Publishing, Inc.
Publication date:
02/19/2007
Series:
Rough Guide Reference Series
Pages:
352
Product dimensions:
5.10(w) x 7.75(h) x 0.75(d)

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Rough Guide to Shopping with a Conscience 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
'Shopping with a conscience' doesn't just mean buying organic fruit--it can also mean eschewing clothing made in sweatshops, or avoiding goods imported from nations with known human rights violations. I found the chapter on socially responsible investing to be especially helpful--it's information like this that probably won't be in the typical 'go green' guide. Also useful are the many sidebars and information panels that give website addresses to various certification agencies and non-profits, in case the reader wants to do any more in-depth research on a certain topic. With so many social and environmental ills, one person cannot hope to be 100% conscientious armed with this book, however, an individual can at least be well-informed.