Roughing It

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Overview

o Includes all 304 first-edition illustrations by True Williams, Edward F. Mullen, and others
o Provides the first and only text that adheres to the author's wishes in details of wording, spelling, and punctuation, restored from original sources.
o Features expert annotation, specially prepared maps, facsimile manuscript pages, and other supplementary documents
o Reproduces ...
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Roughing It

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Overview

o Includes all 304 first-edition illustrations by True Williams, Edward F. Mullen, and others
o Provides the first and only text that adheres to the author's wishes in details of wording, spelling, and punctuation, restored from original sources.
o Features expert annotation, specially prepared maps, facsimile manuscript pages, and other supplementary documents
o Reproduces the text and notes of the Mark Twain Project's 1993 edition, winner of the Modern Language Association Prize for a "Distinguished Scholarly Edition"

Mark Twain's humorous account of his six years in Nevada, San Francisco, and the Sandwich Islands is a patchwork of personal anecdotes and tall tales, many of them told in the "vigorous new vernacular" of the West. Selling seventy five thousand copies within a year of its publication in 1872, Roughing It was greeted as a work of "wild, preposterous invention and sublime exaggeration" whose satiric humor made "pretension and false dignity ridiculous." Meticulously restored from a variety of original sources, the text is the first to adhere to the author's wishes in thousands of details of wording, spelling, and punctuation, and includes all of the 304 first-edition illustrations. With its comprehensive and illuminating notes and supplementary materials, which include detailed maps tracing Mark Twain's western travels, this Mark Twain Library Roughing It must be considered the standard edition for readers and students of Mark Twain.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781626360631
  • Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing
  • Publication date: 2/4/2014
  • Pages: 624
  • Sales rank: 342,184
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 1.40 (d)

Meet the Author


Mark Twain is the pseudonym of Samuel Langhorne Clemens (1835–1910), American writer and humorist, whose best work is characterized by broad, often irreverent humor or biting social satire. Twain's writing is also known for realism of place and language, memorable characters, and hatred of hypocrisy and oppression.

A veteran of stage and screen, Peter Berkrot held feature roles in Caddyshack and Showtime's Brotherhood. He has recorded over 170 audiobooks, over 100 for children; has been nominated for an Audie Award; and has received a number of AudioFile Earphones Awards and starred reviews.

Biography

Mark Twain was born Samuel Langhorne Clemens on November 30, 1835, in Florida, Missouri; his family moved to the port town of Hannibal four years later. His father, an unsuccessful farmer, died when Twain was eleven. Soon afterward the boy began working as an apprentice printer, and by age sixteen he was writing newspaper sketches. He left Hannibal at eighteen to work as an itinerant printer in New York, Philadelphia, St. Louis, and Cincinnati. From 1857 to 1861 he worked on Mississippi steamboats, advancing from cub pilot to licensed pilot.

After river shipping was interrupted by the Civil War, Twain headed west with his brother Orion, who had been appointed secretary to the Nevada Territory. Settling in Carson City, he tried his luck at prospecting and wrote humorous pieces for a range of newspapers. Around this time he first began using the pseudonym Mark Twain, derived from a riverboat term. Relocating to San Francisco, he became a regular newspaper correspondent and a contributor to the literary magazine the Golden Era. He made a five-month journey to Hawaii in 1866 and the following year traveled to Europe to report on the first organized tourist cruise. The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County and Other Sketches (1867) consolidated his growing reputation as humorist and lecturer.

After his marriage to Livy Langdon, Twain settled first in Buffalo, New York, and then for two decades in Hartford, Connecticut. His European sketches were expanded into The Innocents Abroad (1869), followed by Roughing It (1872), an account of his Western adventures; both were enormously successful. Twain's literary triumphs were offset by often ill-advised business dealings (he sank thousands of dollars, for instance, in a failed attempt to develop a new kind of typesetting machine, and thousands more into his own ultimately unsuccessful publishing house) and unrestrained spending that left him in frequent financial difficulty, a pattern that was to persist throughout his life.

Following The Gilded Age (1873), written in collaboration with Charles Dudley Warner, Twain began a literary exploration of his childhood memories of the Mississippi, resulting in a trio of masterpieces --The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876), Life on the Mississippi (1883), and finally The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885), on which he had been working for nearly a decade. Another vein, of historical romance, found expression in The Prince and the Pauper (1882), the satirical A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court (1889), and Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc (1896), while he continued to draw on his travel experiences in A Tramp Abroad (1880) and Following the Equator (1897). His close associates in these years included William Dean Howells, Bret Harte, and George Washington Cable, as well as the dying Ulysses S. Grant, whom Twain encouraged to complete his memoirs, published by Twain's publishing company in 1885.

For most of the 1890s Twain lived in Europe, as his life took a darker turn with the death of his daughter Susy in 1896 and the worsening illness of his daughter Jean. The tone of Twain's writing also turned progressively more bitter. The Tragedy of Pudd'nhead Wilson (1894), a detective story hinging on the consequences of slavery, was followed by powerful anti-imperialist and anticolonial statements such as 'To the Person Sitting in Darkness' (1901), 'The War Prayer' (1905), and 'King Leopold's Soliloquy' (1905), and by the pessimistic sketches collected in the privately published What Is Man? (1906). The unfinished novel The Mysterious Stranger was perhaps the most uncompromisingly dark of all Twain's later works. In his last years, his financial troubles finally resolved, Twain settled near Redding, Connecticut, and died in his mansion, Stormfield, on April 21, 1910.

Author biography courtesy of Random House, Inc.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Samuel Langhorne Clemens (real name); Sieur Louis de Conte
    1. Date of Birth:
      November 30, 1835
    2. Place of Birth:
      Florida, Missouri
    1. Date of Death:
      April 21, 1910
    2. Place of Death:
      Redding, Connecticut

Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER I.


MY brother had just been appointed Secretary of Nevada Territory - an office of such majesty that it concentrated in itself the duties and dignities of Treasurer, Comptroller, Secretary of State, and Acting Governor in the Governor's absence. A salary of eighteen hundred dollars a year and the title of "Mr. Secretary," gave to the great position an air of wild and imposing grandeur. I was young and ignorant, and I envied my brother. I coveted his distinction and his financial splendor, but particularly and especially the long, strange journey he was going to make, and the curious new world he was going to explore. He was going to travel! I never had been away from home, and that word "travel" had a seductive charm for me. Pretty soon he would be hundreds and hundreds of miles away on the great plains and deserts, and among the mountains of the Far West, and would see buffaloes and Indians, and prairie dogs, and antelopes, and have all kinds of adventures, and maybe get hanged or scalped, and have ever such a fine time, and write home and tell us all about it, and be a hero. And he would see the gold mines and the silver mines, and maybe go about of an afternoon when his work was done, and pick up two or three pailfuls of shining slugs and nuggets of gold and silver on the hillside. And by and by he would become very rich, and return home by sea, and be able to talk as calmly about San Francisco and the ocean, and "the isthmus" as if it was nothing of any consequence to have seen those marvels face to face. What I suffered in contemplating his happiness, pen cannot describe. And so, when he offered me, in cold blood, the sublime position of private secretary under him, it appeared to me that the heavens and the earth passed away, and the firmament was rolled together as a scroll! I had nothing more to desire. My contentment was complete. At the end of an hour or two I was ready for the journey. Not much packing up was necessary, because we were going in the overland stage from the Missouri frontier to Nevada, and passengers were only allowed a small quantity of baggage apiece. There was no Pacific railroad in those fine times of ten or twelve years ago - not a single rail of it.

I only proposed to stay in Nevada three months - I had no thought of staying longer than that. I meant to see all I could that was new and strange, and then hurry home to business. I little thought that I would not see the end of that three-month pleasure excursion for six or seven uncommonly long years!

I dreamed all night about Indians, deserts, and silver bars, and in due time, next day, we took shipping at the St. Louis wharf on board a steamboat bound up the Missouri River.

We were six days going from St. Louis to "St. Joe" - a trip that was so dull, and sleepy, and eventless that it has left no more impression on my memory than if its duration had been six minutes instead of that many days. No record is left in my mind, now, concerning it, but a confused jumble of savage-looking snags, which we deliberately walked over with one wheel or the other; and of reefs which we butted and butted, and then retired from and climbed over in some softer place; and of sand-bars which we roosted on occasionally, and rested, and then got out our crutches and sparred over. In fact, the boat might almost as well have gone to St. Joe by land, for she was walking most of the time, anyhow - climbing over reefs and clambering over snags patiently and laboriously all day long. The captain said she was a "bully" boat, and all she wanted was more "shear" and a bigger wheel. I thought she wanted a pair of stilts, but I had the deep sagacity not to say so.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 72 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(26)

4 Star

(20)

3 Star

(11)

2 Star

(8)

1 Star

(7)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 72 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 3, 2010

    Mark Twain comedy at its best

    I have read this book 3 times over the years. The first time it literally had me laughing out loud as I read it on my lunch hours in the company bresk room. It is a hilarious tale of Twains travel adventure by stage coach from the Mississippi to Californias gold fields with a unique historical perspective of the California gold rush that you wont find any where else. Much more entertaining than his other "travel" books.

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2009

    Roughing It

    Mark Twain is always great. For those who want a trip back into our past, Roughing It is fun.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2006

    A Mark Twain's-eye view of Nevada

    This book has no discernable plot or other literary pretenseions to distract from the fun of seeing Virginia City and the Comstock Lode in their heyday through the eyes of a young Samuel Clemens. It could be subtitled 'Autobiography of a Splendid Liar.' It wanders about, goes nowhere in particular and trails off into idle reminiscences, but it's a great trip.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 20, 2012

    Fun read

    As someone who has travelled the areas Twain describes, I can truly appreciate his perspective. Hope its not lost on those that haven't witnessed it first hand.

    A bit wordy in some areas, but a great book nonetheless.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2010

    Fun Book

    Entertaining autobiographical book

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2005

    Great book

    it is one of the best books i ever read

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 15, 2012

    Heathersnow

    *Stares into the water waiting for a fish. Spots one close by and flashes a paw in, clawing it. She does th same three times

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2013

    Educational, historical,  and hilarious.  Join Mark Twain on his

    Educational, historical,  and hilarious.  Join Mark Twain on his journey across 19th century America.  It makes history fun.



    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 16, 2012

    awesome book!

    awesome book!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 13, 2007

    Endless

    After reading the first eight chapters of this book I saw it going nowhere--I was right. To say the least, the book was boring. The thorough descriptions of each character and object in this book made reading it monotonous. This book was no more than a young boy's journal that had no purpose or moral. Honestly, I don't understand why it got published.

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2014

    Ajax

    Hey Lily im back

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2014

    Volefoot

    May i join he said

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2014

    Lily

    Srry fel asleep.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2014

    Silentwish

    The she padded in. Her beautiful gray stiped coat glistendd.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 23, 2014

    Very Entertaining

    Covers Twain's travels from St Joe, MO to the west coast. Highly entertaining. Must read if you liked Huck and Tom from Twain.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2014

    Fang (from bloodclan)

    If you join use a new cat or an previously rped cat. If you use a previously rped cat u must say what clan ur from

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 5, 2013

    Y Tedious for todayd Tedious

    It goes on and on and on -----------

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2013

    Doda

    Good book))

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2013

    Not worth it ... This book was a ripoff

    Not a full book

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 5, 2012

    Highly Recommended

    Even that this is a very long book wont get you tire, Twain show how was to travel through the country when he was alive. It was fun to read!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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