Round and Round Together: Taking a Merry-Go-Round Ride into the Civil Rights Movement

Round and Round Together: Taking a Merry-Go-Round Ride into the Civil Rights Movement

by Amy Nathan
     
 

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"A snapshot of the civil-rights movement in one city provides insight into the important role of individual communities as change moved through the country…a case study of how citizens of one city both precipitated and responded to the whirlwind of social change around them."—Kirkus Reviews

"A profoundly moving tribute to the intrepid unsung

Overview

"A snapshot of the civil-rights movement in one city provides insight into the important role of individual communities as change moved through the country…a case study of how citizens of one city both precipitated and responded to the whirlwind of social change around them."—Kirkus Reviews

"A profoundly moving tribute to the intrepid unsung heroes who risked their lives to help bring an end to Baltimore's Jim Crow Era."—Kam Williams, syndicated columnist

On August 28, 1963—the day of Martin Luther King Jr.'s famous "I Have a Dream" speech—segregation ended finally at Baltimore's Gwynn Oak Amusement Park, after nearly a decade of bitter protests. Eleven-month-old Sharon Langley was the first African American child to go on a ride there that day, taking a spin on the park's merry-go-round, which since 1981 has been located on the National Mall in front of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. Round and Round Together weaves the story of the struggle to integrate that Baltimore amusement park into the story of the civil rights movement as a whole.

Round and Round Together is illustrated with archival photos from newspapers and other sources, as well as personal photos from family albums of individuals interviewed for the book. There is a timeline of major Civil Rights events.

"Amy Nathan's book deftly describes the courageous struggle by blacks and whites to end discrimination in the park, the city, and the nation. Readers will walk away with a clearer understanding of segregation and the valiant Americans who fought against this injustice."—Debra Newman Ham, Professor of History, Morgan State University

"Round and Round Together tells the inspiring story of how a generation of college and high school students provided the energy and enthusiasm that ended racial segregation in Baltimore's Gwynn Oak Amusement Park and changed the direction of Maryland's history."—James Henretta, Professor Emeritus, University of Maryland

"With clarity and passion, Amy Nathan portrays the struggle of everyday citizens to end racial segregation in Baltimore. This compelling history, for and about young people, is simple but profound like freedom itself."—Taylor Branch, Pulitzer Prize–winning author of the trilogy America in the King Years

Amy Nathan is an award-winning author of several books for young people, including The Young Musician's Survival GuideCount on Us: American Women in the MilitaryYankee Doodle Gals: Women Pilots of World War IIMeet the Musicians, and Surviving Homework. She grew up in Baltimore and went to Western High School.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Praise for Amy Nathan and Round and Round Together

"A snapshot of the civil-rights movement in one city provides insight into the important role of individual communities as change moved through the country…a case study of how citizens of one city both precipitated and responded to the whirlwind of social change around them."—Kirkus Reviews

"A profoundly moving tribute to the intrepid unsung heroes who risked their lives to help bring an end to Baltimore's Jim Crow Era."—Kam Williams, syndicated columnist

"Amy Nathan's book deftly describes the courageous struggle by blacks and whites to end discrimination in the park, the city, and the nation. Readers will walk away with a clearer understanding of segregation and the valiant Americans who fought against this injustice."—Debra Newman Ham, Professor of History, Morgan State University

"Round and Round Together tells the inspiring story of how a generation of college and high school students provided the energy and enthusiasm that ended racial segregation in Baltimore's Gwynn Oak Amusement Park and changed the direction of Maryland's history."—James Henretta, Professor Emeritus, University of Maryland

"With clarity and passion, Amy Nathan portrays the struggle of everyday citizens to end racial segregation in Baltimore. This compelling history, for and about young people, is simple but profound like freedom itself."—Taylor Branch, Pulitzer Prize–winning author of the trilogy America in the King Years

Children's Literature - Mary Quattlebaum
A carousel seems an apt symbol for innocent fun—and important change. Author Amy Nathan uses it to focus the little-told historic tale of segregated Gwynn Oak Amusement Park in Baltimore and of the impact of the civil rights movement on Maryland. Short bio boxes and dramatic anecdotes feature local college students, teens and children as young as 8, 9 and 11, black and white, who demanded change, and period photos spotlight Maryland landmarks (Northwood Theater, Riverside Park pool) that proved pivotal. In 1963, tiny Sharon Langley was the first African American child to ride the carousel that now, 48 years later, fittingly graces the National Mall outside the headquarters of the Smithsonian Institute. An important history, all the more fascinating for its local lens. Reviewer: Mary Quattlebaum
Kirkus Reviews
A snapshot of the civil-rights movement in one city provides insight into the important role of individual communities as change moved through the country. The struggle of local activists to integrate a small amusement park in Baltimore, Md., serves as the focus of this examination of attempts to change discrimination laws from the 1940s through the 1960s. What makes this rise from the level of local to national interest is the fact that the classic carousel from the now-defunct Gwynn Oak Park sits on the National Mall, where all ages and races climb aboard. Interestingly enough, the first African-American child to ride the carousel did so on the day Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech during the historic 1963 March on Washington. Nathan, who grew up in Baltimore during this turbulent period, has written a detailed history of the city's civil-rights activism, placing the incident at the park in historical and social context. Many were involved, both black and white, young and old, and a significant number were connected to what was happening beyond their own community. The many period photographs and excellent source credits enhance the story. This very dense narrative will work best as a case study of how citizens of one city both precipitated and responded to the whirlwind of social change around them. (Nonfiction. 14 & up)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781589880719
Publisher:
Dry, Paul Books, Incorporated
Publication date:
11/15/2011
Series:
The Nautilus Series
Pages:
250
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.70(d)
Age Range:
10 - 15 Years

Meet the Author


Amy Nathan: Amy Nathan is an award-winning author of several books for young people, including The Young Musician's Survival Guide, Count on Us: American Women in the Military, Yankee Doodle Gals: Women Pilots of World War II, Meet the Musicians, and Surviving Homework.

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