'Round Midnight

'Round Midnight

4.0 1
by Kenny Burrell
     
 

This is a typically tasteful Kenny Burrell record (reissued on CD) with the guitarist mostly emphasizing ballads. Five of the seven songs (which include "Make Someone Happy," "Since I Fell for You" and the theme from "A Streetcar Named Desire") find Burrell assisted by pianist Richard Wyands (who also played electric piano), bassist…  See more details below

Overview

This is a typically tasteful Kenny Burrell record (reissued on CD) with the guitarist mostly emphasizing ballads. Five of the seven songs (which include "Make Someone Happy," "Since I Fell for You" and the theme from "A Streetcar Named Desire") find Burrell assisted by pianist Richard Wyands (who also played electric piano), bassist Reggie Johnson and drummer Lenny McBrowne. "'Round Midnight" is played by Burrell with pianist Joe Sample, bassist Johnson and drummer Paul Humphrey while "Blues in the Night" is an unaccompanied guitar solo. Although the music overall is well-played, no real sparks fly and the results often border on being sleepy.

Product Details

Release Date:
08/18/1998
Label:
Ojc
UPC:
0025218699020
catalogNumber:
990
Rank:
102674

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'Round Midnight 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The CD re-issue of a Kenny Burrell session is archetypal of why the master guitarist is a favorite of heavy-hitter jazz musicians and casual listeners alike. Mr. Burrell has always been the epitome of understatement, leaving show-offy technique for its own sake to the neophytes and their fans. Unlike some "jazz" guitarists (and reviewers)who confuse lots o' notes with creativity, Kenny Burrell has never forgotten that the roots of jazz is the blues, and his understated maturity of expression on this album reflects that blues-based tradition. As John Coltane stated concerning his "Ballads" album, just having the technique to play blazingly fast notes isn't artistry; it's what's between the notes --the spaces, the pauses, the good editing of what to leave out as well as what to include in a song's performance-- that is most challenging and satisfying. Such disparate guitarists as BB King, Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughn all said that "Kenny Burrell is my favorite guitarist." Although Burrell, as a jazz guitarist, sounds nothing like those other gentlemen (nor does his guitar) such praise reflects the universality of Burrell's artistry and attraction. Perhaps a final analogy will summarize: There are those who think that a screaming, mugging, bad comedic "actor" is a "better" performer than was Laurence Olivier whispering a Shakespearean soliloqy, because the former shows "fireworks." Yes, well, substitute "Burrell" for "Olivier" and you'll understand why when Kenny Burrell plays a gig, the jazz giants are there as fans.