Rover Saves Christmas

Rover Saves Christmas

5.0 5
by Roddy Doyle, Brian Ajhar
     
 

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When Rudolph calls in sick on Christmas Eve (the one night of the year he has to work), Rover - the dog mastermind of the ³poo-for-cash² scheme in THE GIGGLER TREATMENT ­ takes over. With the Mack children in tow, a mad dash around the world to deliver presents before dawn ensues. Along the way, Roddy Doyle pokes good humored fun at everything from traditional

Overview

When Rudolph calls in sick on Christmas Eve (the one night of the year he has to work), Rover - the dog mastermind of the ³poo-for-cash² scheme in THE GIGGLER TREATMENT ­ takes over. With the Mack children in tow, a mad dash around the world to deliver presents before dawn ensues. Along the way, Roddy Doyle pokes good humored fun at everything from traditional Christmas stories and TV shows to James Joyce. And what a relief it is after all the cloyingly sweet, earnest tales of the season. No worries, though ­ the ending is certainly happy. There's even snow!

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
In his first story for children, Booker Prize winner Doyle (Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha) pens a robustly silly romp served up with a generous helping of Irish cheek. At the outset of the tale, Mister Mack, a biscuit tester, is about to step in "dog poo." Displaying a gleefully sadistic sense of timing, Doyle draws out the suspense to outrageous lengths, interrupting his narrative with chapter after chapter of digressions that keep readers squirming in their seats until--does the patriarch step in it or doesn't he? . . . A bracingly rude dose of fun. -- Publishers Weekly Beware, all grown-ups who are contemplating being mean to a child. Do so at your peril. Pay no heed to this warning and you'll be in for . . . the Giggler Treatment! In this funny, very silly, and very gross story for middle graders, Booker-winning Irish author Doyle (for adults, A Star Called Henry, 1999, etc.) proposes that dog poo--a word he deeply enjoys using and describing--lays around for the punishment of adults who are unkind to kids. . . This ludicrous book should more than please the most fervent among the gross-out set. Wait till they see what passes for chapters here, too: one's named for the author's mother (so that he could stay up late) and another, for his refrigerator. Includes an exquisitely wacky glossary. -- Kirkus The award-winning adult novelist offers a delightfully funny and gross book that should appeal to the many fans of Dav Pilkey's "Captain Underpants" series (Scholastic). . . . The comical pen-and-ink cartoons will bring additional giggles. The presence of dog poo as a major element will be enough to draw some readers, but the imaginative narrative and clever plotting make this more than just another silly read. -- School Library Journal

The book has as many surprises as an encyclopedia, including chapter headings that alone are worth the price of admission, but with none of the sobriety. To its credit, the plot is as contrived as possible and proves that, in the right hands, digression is an art form. To be more specific would be to spoil a whole lot of fun.The story is, just by its premise, slightly naughty, but nicely so, never offensively. Has a child ever not tittered about body functions, be they of man or beast? (Second graders, it seems to me, should be ready to handle the book themselves; after that, anyone who can still see the pages. And it was made for read-aloud family fun, no matter how young the audience.) It's in sum, and not to damn the book with the cliched praise of reviews, a delight. It really is clever, insightful, sensical, nonsensical, knowing, amusing, witty, wacky. It makes you laugh out loud; it makes you laugh to yourself. It gives you a contagious case of the you-know-whats.
-- The New York Times Book Review

The cast of characters from The Giggler Treatment (Scholastic, 2000) is back. This time the action shifts from Dublin to the North Pole as Rover is needed to replace Rudolph at the front of Santa's reindeer team. Fans of Dav Pilkey, Jon Scieszka, and Lemony Snicket will appreciate this zany, irreverent story that spoofs literary and bookmaking conventions and includes references to Harry Potter, dog poo, and monkeys' bums. Doyle depicts a somewhat insecure Santa who needs some spunky, problem-solving kids and a crafty dog to get the job done. Don't expect a straightforward, traditional, linear narrative. The wordplay and the gags are the important things here. Even the glossary of Irish expressions is part of the fun.
--School Library Journal, October 2001

Combine on talking dog, Santa Claus, his reindeer Rudolph, who has the flu, lizards that change their names to fit a climate, four children, and a variety of talking objects and appliances, add an irreverent tone and cheeky style, and presto: a nonsensical and nonlinear story based on the belief in Santa. Rover (The Giggler Treatment, 2000) subs for Rudolph and with

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The Barnes & Noble Review
Sassy silliness abounds in Roddy Doyle's masterpiece of holiday mayhem, Rover Saves Christmas. It's Christmas Eve, and Santa's in a panic because he's already behind schedule and Rudolph is on strike, the victim of both the flu and some sort of midlife crisis. It seems that none of the other reindeer are capable of filling Rudolph's shoes, but that's okay, because Santa has someone else in mind: a dog named Rover.

Rover isn't just any dog. He walks, he talks, he has a brain the size of Africa, and he makes a nice living selling his poo to practical jokers. The two youngsters who live next door to Rover, Robbie and Jimmy Mack, are delighted to discover the dog's higher calling, for they get to go along for the ride and spend Christmas Eve traveling around the world in Santa's sleigh. But nothing in this ticklish tale is that straightforward, including the story itself, which is filled with silly asides, ridiculous non sequiturs, and comical commercial breaks. The worldwide trip is plagued with obstacles, including a group of machine gun–toting boorakooka birds, the persistent progress of the clock, and several moments of Santa self-doubt that threaten to bring the sleigh tumbling out of the sky. But with a bit of ingenuity that has the crew bungee-jumping down chimneys and using a star constellation shaped like a monkey's bum to guide them, Santa prevails, and Christmas once again arrives on schedule. Well, maybe just a few minutes late.

Doyle drops names with shameless abandon, pulling them from an eclectic group that includes such luminaries as Bruce Springsteen and Harry Potter. There are also dozens of sly cultural references guaranteed to generate a snort or two among adults, who will have as much fun as any kid (maybe more) with the story. With its clever wordplay, offbeat humor, and touch of Christmas magic, Rover Saves Christmas is destined to become a traditional holiday classic. (Beth Amos)

Publishers Weekly
The cast of The Giggler Treatment makes a return engagement for the holidays in this invitingly loopy escapade. Rudolph languishes with the flu and Santa appeals to canine Rover and his young owners to take over for the evening. Doyle addresses readers directly on numerous occasions, and if the fun feels a little frenetically self-conscious at times, it's still enormously entertaining. Ajhar's frisky drawings add to the mayhem. Ages 8-12. (Nov.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
It's Christmas Eve in Dublin and it's so hot the lizards are wearing flip-flops. No, that can't be right. It's snowing. Or is it? This book is silly, zany and irreverent—and kids will love it. When Rudolph gets the flu, Santa is forced to hitch a sleigh full of lizards and kids to a dog named Rover. Readers will learn why lizards are naturals at delivering presents (hint—it has something to do with their long, sticky tongues). They will also discover machine-gun-toting Boorakooka birds, and the Finnish word for poo. Filled with narrative interruptions and hilarious asides, this book treats readers to a wild one-night ride. Even the glossary is funny. Will Santa finish in time? Then what? Choose from multiple endings—soppy, crazy, too violent for responsible adults, or real. Doyle's genius for comic intrusion and narrative originality prevent this wacky tale from being just another silly story. Anyone (adults included) old enough to appreciate The Stinky Cheese Man level of unconventional humor and convoluted story lines will love Rover. There are a couple of PG words, but readers will be laughing too hard to dwell on them. Brian Ajhar's drawings add to the fun. 2001, Scholastic, $14.95. Ages 7 up. Reviewer: Betty Hicks
School Library Journal
Gr 2-5-The cast of characters from The Giggler Treatment (Scholastic, 2000) is back. This time the action shifts from Dublin to the North Pole as Rover is needed to replace Rudolph at the front of Santa's reindeer team. Fans of Dav Pilkey, Jon Scieszka, and Lemony Snicket will appreciate this zany, irreverent story that spoofs literary and bookmaking conventions and includes references to Harry Potter, dog poo, and monkeys' bums. Doyle depicts a somewhat insecure Santa who needs some spunky, problem-solving kids and a crafty dog to get the job done. Don't expect a straightforward, traditional, linear narrative. The wordplay and the gags are the important things here. Even the glossary of Irish expressions is part of the fun.-V. W. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Combine one talking dog, Santa Claus, his reindeer Rudolph, who has the flu, lizards that change their names to fit a climate, four children, and a variety of talking objects and appliances; add an irreverent tone and cheeky style, and presto: a nonsensical and nonlinear story based on the belief in Santa. Rover (The Giggler Treatment, 2000) subs for Rudolph and with the aid of the aforementioned, the race is on to get all the presents delivered in time. Kids ingrained with Saturday morning cartoons may find this hilarious but the irreverence, bathroom humor, illogic of constant interruptions (labeled as such) in the narrative, and admonishments like Warning directed to the reader will be tiresome to adults. The one sentence of Chapter Six claims: "I don't want to be Chapter Six." Constellations are named "Teacher's Armpit" and "Monkey's Bum." Pop references and British terms abound, such as mad cows, Guinness, nappies, Rover Bond (as in James), and, of course, Harry Potter. A glossary offers smart-alecky explanations. Major promotion will hype the seasonal aspect and the large type and brief chapters may lure fans of Doyle's "poo-on-shoe" humor. This spoof on Christmas needs to restring its lights to make it less dependent on the distracting gimmicks and silly devices and focus on the goofy, outlandish appeal of a talking dog leading Santa's sleigh across the world. (Fiction. 8-11)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780439305303
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
11/01/2001
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
160
Product dimensions:
6.08(w) x 9.44(h) x 0.69(d)
Lexile:
570L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Born in Dublin, Ireland in 1958, Roddy Doyle has become one of the most renown and celebrated Irish authors of the late twentieth century. Doyl received his Bachelor of Arts from St. Finian’s Christian Brothers School in Sutton and went on to University College, Dublin. Upon the completion of his education, Roddy Doyle worked as a Geography and English teacher in Kilbarrack, North Dublin.

Roddy Doyle’s adult novel, Paddy Clark Ha Ha Ha, a story about a ten-year old boy living Ireland, won Doyle the Booker Prize, the United Kingdom’s greatest literary honor.

Roddy Doyle lives in Ireland with his wife, Belinda and their two children.

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Rover Saves Christmas 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Hands down the most hilarious children's book we've ever read. It is in a league by itself and we hope Roddy Doyle will write many many more....
Guest More than 1 year ago
A very funny book. If you read it out loud you would be laughing your head off!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Very funny!!! Just as good as the giggler treatment.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was a super follow-up to 'The Giggler Treatment.' Very fun to read aloud with the kids!
Guest More than 1 year ago
With humor that crosses the generations, this book may be listed for ages 4-8 but the parent reading it aloud will be laughing as hard as the child. A quick read that will leave you feeling good for the rest of the day.