A Roving Commission or Through the Black Insurrection at Hayti [NOOK Book]

Overview

Preface

Horrible as were the atrocities of which the monsters of the French Revolution were guilty, they paled before the fiendish outrages committed by their black imitators in Haiti. Indeed, for some six years the island presented a saturnalia of massacre, attended with indescribable tortures. It may be admitted that the retaliation inflicted by the maddened whites after the first massacre was as full of horrors as were the outrages ...
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A Roving Commission or Through the Black Insurrection at Hayti

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Overview

Preface

Horrible as were the atrocities of which the monsters of the French Revolution were guilty, they paled before the fiendish outrages committed by their black imitators in Haiti. Indeed, for some six years the island presented a saturnalia of massacre, attended with indescribable tortures. It may be admitted that the retaliation inflicted by the maddened whites after the first massacre was as full of horrors as were the outrages perpetrated by the blacks, and both were rivalled by the mulattoes when they joined in the general madness for blood. The result was ruin to all concerned. France lost one of her fairest possessions, and a wealthy race of cultivators, many belonging to the best blood of France, were annihilated or driven into poverty among strangers. The mulattoes, many of whom were also wealthy, soon found that the passions they had done so much to foment were too powerful for them; their position under the blacks was far worse and more precarious, than it had been under the whites. The negroes gained a nominal liberty. Nowhere were the slaves so well treated as by the French colonists, and they soon discovered that, so far from profiting by the massacre of their masters and families, they were infinitely worse off than before. They were still obliged to work to some extent to save themselves from starvation; they had none to look to for aid in the time of sickness and old age; hardships and fevers had swept them away wholesale; the trade of the island dwindled almost to nothing; and at last the condition of the negroes in Haiti has fallen to the level of that of the savage African tribes. Unless some strong white power should occupy the island and enforce law and order, sternly repress crime, and demand a certain amount of labour from all able-bodied men, there seems no hope that any amelioration can take place in the present situation.

G. A. HENTY.

Illustration: “I have heard a great deal of you, Mr. Glover,” the admiral said.
Chapter 1. A Fight with a Bloodhound
Chapter 2. Rejoined
Chapter 3. A Slave Depot
Illustration: “Headed by Nat, the crew of the gig leapt down on to the deck.”
Chapter 4. A Sharp Fight
Illustration: The guns on the Rampart send a shower of grape into the pirate.
Chapter 5. A Pirate Hold
Chapter 6. The Negro Rising
Chapter 7. In Hiding
Illustration: “It was not long before he came across the figure of a prostrate man.”
Chapter 8. A Time of Waiting
Chapter 9. An Attack on the Cave
Illustration: “He fell like a log over the precipice.”
Chapter 10. Afloat Again
Illustration: The journey to the coast.
Chapter 11. A First Command
Chapter 12. A Rescue
Illustration: The rescue of Louise Pickard.
Illustration: “Four shots were fired and as many Negroes fell.”
Chapter 13. Two Captures
Illustration: “The captain of the pirates shook his fist in defiance.”
Chapter 14. The Attack on Port-Au-Prince
Chapter 15. The Attack on Port-Au-Prince
Illustration: A message from Toussaint L’ouverture.
Chapter 16. Toussaint L’ouverture
Illustration: “Drop it!” Nat repeated.
Chapter 17. A French Frigate
Illustration: Nat sprang on to the rail.
Chapter 18. Another Engagement
Chapter 19. Home
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940014086103
  • Publisher: Denise Henry
  • Publication date: 2/5/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 274
  • File size: 2 MB

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