Rowan of Rin (Rowan of Rin Series #1)

( 10 )

Overview

Seven hearts the journey make. Seven ways t he hearts will break.

The wise woman's warning rings in Rowan's head as he and six companions set out to climb the forbidden Mountain that towers over their village, Rin. The stream Rin depends on has stopped flowing, and these seven are seeking the source of the problem. But no one who has tried to climb the Mountain has ever returned. Legend has it that there is a dragon at the top; every morning ...

See more details below
This Audiobook (Other - Unabridged) is Not Available through BN.com
Sending request ...

Overview

Seven hearts the journey make. Seven ways t he hearts will break.

The wise woman's warning rings in Rowan's head as he and six companions set out to climb the forbidden Mountain that towers over their village, Rin. The stream Rin depends on has stopped flowing, and these seven are seeking the source of the problem. But no one who has tried to climb the Mountain has ever returned. Legend has it that there is a dragon at the top; every morning and evening the people hear its roar.

Rowan is terrified. In a village where people pride themselves on being hardy and brave, Rowan has always been timid and shy. He is teased by the other children and belittled by the adults, who whisper that he will never be the man his father was.

This dangerous journey is Rowan's chance to step out of his father's shadow and earn the respect of the village. But, frightened by the perils that lie ahead, Rowan isn't even thinking about this possibility. He's just wondering if he can survive.

Because only he can read the magical map, young, weak, and timid Rowan joins six other villagers to climb a mountain and try to restore their water supply, as fears of a dragon and other horrors threaten to drive them back.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Fatherless Rowan is a scrawny, shy outcast among the children of his village, eclipsed in everyone's eyes by memories of his dead father and uncomfortable at the emerging relationship between his widowed mother and Allun the baker, who seems to view the boy with pitying scorn. But when the waters of Rin unexpectedly cease to flow, Rowan is permitted to join the quest to uncover this mystery, as he is the only one able to read the enchanted map given to the questers by Sheba, the local herb-woman and witch. Along the way the small band encounters swarming spiders, murky swamps, frigid waters, narrow caves and, finally, a fire-breathing dragon. The other six questers one by one abandon the quest, leaving Rowan to become the unlikely hero when he defeats the dragon, restores the flow of water to Rin, and saves his future stepfather's life. Rhoda, an Australian author, has created a convincing, quasi-medieval world, with a (somewhat overly) large cast of characters presented in refreshingly non-sexist roles. Rowan's story is narrated in a simple, classic storytelling style, and the ending, though hardly surprising, is undeniably satisfying. 2001 (orig. 1993), Scholastic, $14.95. Ages 7 up. Reviewer:Claudia Mills
School Library Journal
Gr 4-6-The people of Rin are strong and brave, except for young Rowan. He spends his time caring for the bukshah, the gentle beasts that the villagers depend on for their survival. When their stream suddenly stops flowing and the bukshah are in danger of dying, six of the strongest, bravest villagers decide to climb the Mountain, hoping to avoid the Dragon that lives there, to find out what has happened. However, Sheba the Wise Woman is the only one who knows the way, and she has decided that Rowan must accompany the party, so she gives them a magic map that can only be read if he is holding it. Rowan starts off as fragile and a little whiny, but improves steadily, especially as he begins to realize that he plays an important role in the expedition. He is able to succeed through his own efforts, not through magic. The adults are one-dimensional at first, but as Rowan learns more about them, so do readers, and two of them prove to have unexpected depth. Traditional fantasy elements and setting are presented in a fast-moving and enjoyable tale that should be an easy sell to fantasy lovers.-Mara Alpert, Los Angeles Public Library Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780788799839
  • Publisher: Recorded Books, LLC
  • Publication date: 1/21/2002
  • Series: Rowan of Rin Series , #1
  • Format: Other
  • Edition description: Unabridged
  • Age range: 9 years

Meet the Author

Emily Rodda has written many books for children, including Finders Keepers, which School Library journal dubbed "a lively adventure," and several novels about the likable hero Rowan. The first of these novels, Rowan of Rin, won the Children's Book Council of Australia Book of the Year for Younger Readers Award when it was first published. In fact, Emily Rodda has won the Children's Book Council of Australia Book of the Year Award an unprecedented five times. A former editor, Ms. Rodda is also the best-selling author of adult mysteries under the name Jennifer Rowe. She lives in Australia.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

The Meeting

One morning the people of Rin woke to find that the stream that flowed down the Mountain and through their village had slowed to a trickle. By nightfall even that small flow had stopped. The mill wheel lay idle. There was no water to turn its heavy blades. The bukshah drinking pool on the other side of the village was still. No bubbling stream was stirring it into life and keeping it topped up to the brim.

There was no change on the second day, or the third. By the fourth day the water in the pool was thick and brown. The bukshah shook their heavy heads and pawed the ground when they went to drink in the morning and the evening.

After five days the pool was so shallow that even little Annad, who was only five years old, could touch the bottom with her hand without getting her sleeve wet. And still the stream failed to flow.

On the evening of the sixth day the worried people met in the market square to talk. "The bukshah could not drink at all today," said Lann, the oldest person in the village and once the greatest fighter. "If we do not act soon, they will die."

"Not Star," whispered Annad to her brother, who was the keeper of the bukshah. "Star will not die, though, will she, Rowan? Because you will give Star water from our well."

"Bukshah cannot drink from our well, Annad," said Rowan. "it is not sweet enough for them. It makes them ill. They can only drink the water that flows down from the Mountain. It has always been so. If the stream stays dry, Star will die like all the rest."

Annad began to sob quietly. The children of Rin were not supposed to cry, but Annad was very young,and she loved Star. Rowan stared straight ahead. His eyes were tearless, but his chest and throat ached with sadness and fear. The sadness was for Star, his friend and the strongest and gentlest of all the bukshah. And for all the other great, humped woolly beasts, each of which he knew by name. But the fear was for himself. For himself and Annad and their mother and indeed for the whole village.

Rowan knew, as Annad did not, that without the bukshah there would be no rich, creamy milk to drink, no cheese, curd, and butter to eat. There would be no thick gray wool for cloth. There would be no help to plow the fields or carry in the harvest. There would be no broad backs to bear the burdens on the long journeys down to the coast to trade with the clever, silent Maris folk. The life of Rin depended on the bukshah. Without them, the village, too, would die.

Annad could not imagine the valley without the village. But Rowan could. Reading the old stories in the house of books, listening half asleep to Timon under the teaching tree, and, most of all, sitting on the grass by the stream while the bukshah grazed around him in the silence of the morning, he had often imagined this place as the first settlers must have seen it.

Hundreds of years ago they had climbed through the hills, carrying the few things they owned on their backs, looking for somewhere in this strange land that they could claim as their own. They had come from far away, across the sea. They had fought a terrible enemy On the coast they had heard, the wandering native people they called the Travelers, of a place at the bottom of a forbidden mountain in the high country far inland. They had been tramping for many, many days in search of it. They were very tired. Some had almost given up hope. Then, one afternoon, they had topped a rise and looked down. There below them, nestled between a towering mountain ahead and the hill on which they stood, was a green, secret valley.

The people stared, speechless. They saw trees loaded with small blue fruits and fields of flowers they did not recognize. They saw a stream, and a pool, and a herd of strange gray beasts lifting their heads to stare, horns shining in the sun. They saw silence, stillness, and rich earth, and peace. The people knew then that this was the place. This would be their home. So they came down and mingled with the big, gentle animals, who were tame and unafraid. They called them the bukshah.

"The stream flows down from the Mountain," said Bronden, the furniture maker, her loud voice breaking into Rowan's thoughts. He watched her stab the air with her stubby finger, pointing. "So the problem must be up there. Up there, something is amiss. Something is stopping the flow."

All eyes turned to the Mountain rising high above the village, its tip shrouded as always in cloud.

"We must climb the Mountain and find out what it is," Bronden went on. "This is our only chance."

"No!" Neel, the potter, shook his head. "We cannot climb the Mountain. Even the Travelers do not venture there. Terrible dangers await anyone who dares. And at the top-the Dragon."

Bronden sneered at him. "You are talking like a crazy Traveler yourself, Neel! There is no Dragon. The Dragon is a story told to children to make them behave. If there was a Dragon, we would have seen it. It would prey on the bukshah--and on us."

"Perhaps it takes its prey elsewhere. We do not know, Bronden." Allun the baker's light, pleasant voice rose above the muttering of the crowd. "But if you will excuse me for talking like a crazy Traveler remembering that my father was one, and it is only to be expected-let me remind you of what we do know." His usually smiling face was grim as he stared Bronden down. "We do know that we hear it roar almost every morning and every night. And that we see its fire in the cloud...

Rowan of Rin. Copyright © by Emily Rodda. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
Read More Show Less

First Chapter

Rowan of Rin #1: Rowan of Rin

Chapter One

The Meeting

One morning the people of Rin woke to find that the stream that flowed down the Mountain and through their village had slowed to a trickle. By nightfall even that small flow had stopped. The mill wheel lay idle. There was no water to turn its heavy blades. The bukshah drinking pool on the other side of the village was still. No bubbling stream was stirring it into life and keeping it topped up to the brim.

There was no change on the second day, or the third. By the fourth day the water in the pool was thick and brown. The bukshah shook their heavy heads and pawed the ground when they went to drink in the morning and the evening.

After five days the pool was so shallow that even little Annad, who was only five years old, could touch the bottom with her hand without getting her sleeve wet. And still the stream failed to flow.

On the evening of the sixth day the worried people met in the market square to talk. "The bukshah could not drink at all today," said Lann, the oldest person in the village and once the greatest fighter. "If we do not act soon, they will die."

"Not Star," whispered Annad to her brother, who was the keeper of the bukshah. "Star will not die, though, will she, Rowan? Because you will give Star water from our well."

"Bukshah cannot drink from our well, Annad," said Rowan. "It is not sweet enough for them. It makes them ill. They can only drink the water that flows down from the Mountain. It has always been so. If the stream stays dry, Star will die like all the rest."

Annad began to sob quietly. The children of Rin were not supposed to cry, but Annad was very young, and she loved Star. Rowan stared straight ahead. His eyes were tearless, but his chest and throat ached with sadness and fear. The sadness was for Star, his friend and the strongest and gentlest of all the bukshah. And for all the other great, humped woolly beasts, each of which he knew by name. But the fear was for himself. For himself and Annad and their mother and indeed for the whole village.

Rowan knew, as Annad did not, that without the bukshah there would be no rich, creamy milk to drink, no cheese, curd, and butter to eat. There would be no thick gray wool for cloth. There would be no help to plow the fields or carry in the harvest. There would be no broad backs to bear the burdens on the long journeys down to the coast to trade with the clever, silent Maris folk. The life of Rin depended on the bukshah. Without them, the village, too, would die.

Annad could not imagine the valley without the village. But Rowan could. Reading the old stories in the house of books, listening half asleep to Timon under the teaching tree, and, most of all, sitting on the grass by the stream while the bukshah grazed around him in the silence of the morning, he had often imagined this place as the first settlers must have seen it.

Hundreds of years ago they had climbed through the hills, carrying the few things they owned on their backs, looking for somewhere in this strange land that they could claim as their own. They had come from far away, across the sea. They had fought a terrible enemy. On the coast they had heard, from the wandering native people they called the Travelers, of a place at the bottom of a forbidden mountain in the high country far inland. They had been tramping for many, many days in search of it. They were very tired. Some had almost given up hope. Then, one afternoon, they had topped a rise and looked down. There below them, nestled between a towering mountain ahead and the hill on which they stood, was a green, secret valley.

The people stared, speechless. They saw trees loaded with small blue fruits and fields of flowers they did not recognize. They saw a stream, and a pool, and a herd of strange gray beasts lifting their heads to stare, horns shining in the sun. They saw silence, stillness, and rich earth, and peace. The people knew then that this was the place. This would be their home. So they came down and mingled with the big, gentle animals, who were tame and unafraid. They called them the bukshah.

"The stream flows down from the Mountain," said Bronden the furniture maker, her loud voice breaking into Rowan's thoughts. He watched her stab the air with her stubby finger, pointing. "So the problem must be up there. Up there, something is amiss. Something is stopping the flow."

All eyes turned to the Mountain rising high above the village, its tip shrouded as always in cloud.

"We must climb the Mountain and find out what it is," Bronden went on. "This is our only chance."

"No!" Neel the potter shook his head. "We cannot climb the Mountain. Even the Travelers do not venture there. Terrible dangers await anyone who dares. And at the top -- the Dragon."

Bronden sneered at him. "You are talking like a crazy Traveler yourself, Neel! There is no Dragon. The Dragon is a story told to children to make them behave. If there was a Dragon, we would have seen it. It would prey on the bukshah -- and on us."

"Perhaps it takes its prey elsewhere. We do not know, Bronden." Allun the baker's light, pleasant voice rose above the muttering of the crowd. "But if you will excuse me for talking like a crazy Traveler -- remembering that my father was one, and it is only to be expected -- let me remind you of what we do know." His usually smiling face was grim as he stared Bronden down. "We do know that we hear it roar almost every morning and every night. And that we see its fire in the cloud."

Rowan of Rin #1: Rowan of Rin. Copyright © by Emily Rodda. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 10 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(6)

4 Star

(4)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2013

    I read this book series when I was in sixth grade, and I absolut

    I read this book series when I was in sixth grade, and I absolutely loved it. It's been 10 years, and I still think about this book. It's amazing. Lots of adventures and perils that keep me hooked. Definitely worth reading again.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 3, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    A Tale of Courage Gentle spirited Rowan is thought of as weak b

    A Tale of Courage

    Gentle spirited Rowan is thought of as weak by the strong and hardy folk in his village, Rin. He doesn’t measure up to the other villagers; in him they see no value and he has learned to see no value in himself. Only the peaceful creatures he tends named the bukshah love and appreciate him. When an expedition to the top of the mountain is formed to save the bukshah Rowan is forced to go. Haunted by fear and scorned and pitied by the other members of the expedition Rowan is driven by the faith the bukshah have in him to meet the dragon who lives at the top of mountain.

    Throughout this book Rowan struggles to exhaustion to combat his fears and do things others find so easy. Who among us hasn’t felt that way? We spend a lifetime trying to be good enough only to be bashed down. Most people can identify with Rowan and even at times his companions in this book.

    One of the lessons Rowan learns is to see more clearly. He learns to see himself and his companions in a truer light; they are not as invincible as he thought and he is braver than he knew. As the only one to complete the quest he also learns what true bravery is; it is overcoming your fear and doing something even though it frightens you. It is a lesson many people in the real world have yet to master.

    This is a book I have come back to many times and each time I read it I am immediately transported to the valley of Rin. It is written for a younger age group than I tend to read, but the rich texture and characters appeals to many ages. The writing is graceful and Rodda is able to keep the momentum up throughout the story. With universal themes of learning to value yourself and bravery in the face of fear I give this book four stars.

    Definitely give this book a chance!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 25, 2009

    Another great book series by Emily Rodda

    My 11 year old son and I have read Emily Rodda books for 2 years now. We started with the Deltora series and moved on to Rowan of Rin. Her characters are so full of detail and the story lines always keep us guessing. Keep the books coming!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2008

    This amazing adventure caught my eye from the...

    This amazing adventure cuaght my eye from the incredible dragon on the front. It was an adventure 'the town of Rin would never forget,' as the book calls it. This adventure was an awesome tale. the feirce look of the dragon with it's kind heart burried underneath it's scales. No one would have known unless they saw it themselves. Most wouldn't have made it though. It was a dangerous way up to the high mountain. In this tale the young boy, Rowan, agrees with his freinds that they have to go up the mountain of Rin to save their town. It was an incredible book, I loved it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 2, 2007

    Outstanding

    Yes, the book was outstanding, simply amazing one of best books I have ever read. The way the author wrote those words simply amazed me. When I saw the book, I said, ¿Wow, The Rowen of Rin.¿ I glanced at it for around 15 seconds, and then I picked it up and I started to read it. The first page was as good as all the others in the book so detailed the you want to read it again and again. The book made me feel like Rowen and like I was the one in danger. I love all Fantasy books and you should to. The best part in the book is when the map reads,¿Seven harts the journey make. seven ways the heart will break the bravest heart will carry on when sleep is death and all hope is gone, look into the fiery jaws of fear and see the answer white and clear then throw away all thoughts of home for only then your quest is done.¿ Then Rowen gets it he found out go into the jaws of the dragon to find the problem. He took the bone that was wedged in the dragon tooth out. The dragon went to eat Strong Jonn but Rowen dragged Jonn out just in time then they broke the ice, stopping the water stream for the Rin folk. Then they were home, but instead of Jonn saving Rowen, Rowen saved Jon. I would highly recommend this book for anyone who likes Nerve racking Fantasy and if you do get the Rowen of Rin. The best journey of your life...

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2007

    THANK YOU EMILY RODDA FOR WRITING GREAT, GREAT BOOKS FOR BOYS

    Like Emily Rodda's previous series, Deltor Quest, Rowan of Rin is an outstanding series for young boys. Full of excitement and adventure that engages even my reluctant-to-read son. There are very few books like this written for this age group, and I can't thank Emily Rodda enough for writing them!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 23, 2004

    You will love this book

    Seven Hearts the Journey make, Seven Ways the Hearts will break¿ At the Prophecy of Sheba the wise woman seven people of Rin have to climb the forbidden Mountain. Val, Ellis, Bronden, Allun, Marlie, Allun, Strong Jonn and the seventh unwanted member is Rowan. Bit by bit the party grows smaller until it is just Jonn and Rowan facing the ancient Dragon at the top of the Mountain¿..

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2003

    A very good read and captivating story.

    My 8 year old son and I selected this book at the local public library for reading while searching for some of the Deltora Quest books and we both enjoyed it. It was a "short" enough and fast moving tale that held his interest very much. As an older reader, I was taken in by the story and the characters. I found it and the other three Rowan books much more enjoyable over Ms. Rodda's Deltora Quest series myself as it didn't seem "formulaic" at all. Rowan is an unlikely and unassuming hero who is the center of these stories. He is not strong or willful, yet his heart and hidden courage see him through. I reccommend this good book for the young reader, and for those who want a wonderful tale that can be read over a long afternoon or couple of days. I will definitely re-read these myself.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 25, 2001

    READ IT!!! READ IT!!!READ IT!!!

    WOW!! I read this book when I was in 4th grade, and now I am in 7th yet i still remember how GREAT this book is. I will never forget its enchantment and charm. If you are a fantasy lover, or a mystery lover, or an adventure lover, YOU WILL LOVE THIS BOOK!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)