Roy Morelli Steps Up to the Plate

( 1 )

Overview

Eight-grader Roy Morelli can’t wait for baseball season to start so he can take his rightful place as shortstop for the Pilchuk All-Star team. Being on the All-Stars is just the warm-up for the big leagues: the varsity baseball team at the high school Roy will go to next year. But when Roy’s divorced parents find out he’s failing history, they make him quit the All-Stars. It’s not his fault the only thing interesting about history class is Valerie Hopkins, and she won’t even ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (12) from $1.99   
  • New (2) from $11.98   
  • Used (10) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$11.98
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(278)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
0385904061 New item in stock, may show minimal wear from storage. No remainder mark. I ship daily and provide tracking! 100% Money Back Guarantee!

Ships from: FORT MYERS, FL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$11.98
Seller since 2013

Feedback rating:

(3)

Condition: New
LIBRARY BINDING New 0385904061 New item in stock, may show minimal wear from storage. No remainder mark. I ship daily and provide tracking! 100% Money Back Guarantee!

Ships from: LEHIGH ACRES, FL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Roy Morelli Steps Up to the Plate

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$6.99
BN.com price
This digital version does not exactly match the physical book displayed here.
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.

Overview

Eight-grader Roy Morelli can’t wait for baseball season to start so he can take his rightful place as shortstop for the Pilchuk All-Star team. Being on the All-Stars is just the warm-up for the big leagues: the varsity baseball team at the high school Roy will go to next year. But when Roy’s divorced parents find out he’s failing history, they make him quit the All-Stars. It’s not his fault the only thing interesting about history class is Valerie Hopkins, and she won’t even give Roy the time of day.

Now Roy is stuck on a losing team in the wimpy rec league, and instead of playing ball every spare minute, he’s spending his afternoons with a tutor—who just happens to be his dad’s brainiac girlfriend. If Roy’s going to impress the varsity baseball coach, he’s sure he should be looking out for number one, not wasting his time studying. After all, baseball is what Roy does best. But when his grades continue to slide and his teammates get tired of his know-it-all attitude, Roy Morelli will need to step up to the plate. . . .

From the Hardcover edition.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 6–9—Eighth-grader Roy Morelli is looking forward to playing on an elite all-star baseball team as a means of impressing the high school coach and enhancing his chances of starting on the varsity as a freshman. When his history grade slips, however, his parents make him drop down to a less competitive, less demanding rec-league team, where none of the other players seem to care about winning. Roy alienates his teammates with his aggressive style and know-it-all attitude and gets in trouble at home for his continued apathetic approach toward his studies. When his divorced father's girlfriend becomes his tutor, Roy is initially resentful, but eventually comes to appreciate the way she makes history come alive. He is able to apply the lessons he has learned both to improve his history grade and to mend relationships with his teammates. While somewhat predictable, the novel features good characterization and some sizzling dialogue, especially between Roy and his frenemy, Valerie Hopkins. The game action is fast paced and exciting, the depiction of middle school dynamics rings true, and the main character shows genuine emotional growth over the course of the novel.—Richard Luzer, Fair Haven Union High School, VT
Kirkus Reviews
A .370 average is great in baseball but not so great in history class, and since Roy Morelli is failing history, his parents won't allow him to play for the Pilchuk All-Star team; he has to get a tutor and raise his grades first. Ray has the tools to be a fine player-average, power, base running, speed and arm strength-but, as Coach Harden tells him, there's a sixth tool-the mental game-and this is precisely what Roy most needs to develop. Roy's quest for that sixth tool is the heart and soul of this fine baseball novel. Heldring effectively captures the wise-guy, self-righteous attitude of an eighth-grade boy and carefully delineates Roy's change of character as he comes to understand what it takes to be a team player. With plenty of well-described baseball action and a protagonist to care about, this will be a hit with young baseball fans. (Fiction. 9-14)
Children's Literature - Cynthia Levinson
Eighth-grader Roy Morelli's sole goal is to impress the high school baseball coach enough to land a spot on the varsity team in the fall. He's been playing well with the All-Stars and will have plenty of time to practice and show off his skills before he is scouted. Then he earns Ds in American History and is sent to the principal's office for pestering Valerie, the girl he likes. His parents, who are divorced, pull him off the team. They send him back to the rec league to play with kids who do it for fun rather than victory, and they make him study history every day. Worse, Roy's father arranges for his girlfriend Camille to tutor both Roy and Valerie. Rather than study, Roy takes advice from a classmate on how to ace multiple-choice tests (e.g., the answers are never the same letter two questions in a row). The results are disastrous. On the field, his new, bumbling teammates complain about his lack of sportsmanship. By the end, Roy learns to appreciate history and to bunt a sacrifice out for the good of the team, thus impressing the high school coach. He learns the lesson: "The harder the trip is to get there, the better it feels when you do." The characters, though not vivid, are believable. The tensions, though not suspenseful, are real enough. Most of the relationships, though not fully developed, are workable. The baseball games are described in such detail that any athlete will enjoy the book and find it a worthwhile read. Reviewer: Cynthia Levinson
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780385904063
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 3/9/2010
  • Format: Library Binding
  • Pages: 240
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.70 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Thatcher Heldring lives with his wife and son in Seattle, a good place for indoor sports. Visit him online at www.thatchertheauthor.com.

From the Hardcover edition.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Roy Morelli Steps Up to the Plate


By Thatcher Heldring

Delacorte Books for Young Readers

Copyright © 2010 Thatcher Heldring
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780385904063

* 1 *

Three more," Dad said, stepping off the mound.

"Make 'em count," I told him, wiggling the bat.

We were on one of the eight ball fields that surrounded the grandstand, the small, half-covered stadium that sat in the middle of Boardman Park. Baseball season started next week, and I needed to shake off the winter rust.

"What do you want?" Dad called. He was tall, like me, but heavy. He was wearing jeans and a faded green Pilchuck High School T-shirt. His hair hung over the top of his ears, like it had for as long as I could remember.

"Whatever you got, old-timer," I said, twisting my toe into the dirt, imagining this was the last inning of the biggest game of my life.

"Old-timer?" Dad asked, like he hadn't heard me right.

"That's what I said." I tugged on my ear and pointed to Dad. "Maybe you should adjust that hearing aid."

Dad gripped all three baseballs in his right hand and held them out for me to see. "You know what these are?" he asked.

"What?"

"Strike one, strike two, and strike three."

I shook my head and smiled. "No way, old man."

He stepped back onto the mound. "First pitch," he said, bending forward to start his windup.

"Just make sure it comes with mustard."

Dad smiled. "Order up." Heleaned back, then stepped into a breaking ball that curved to the outside corner as it crossed the plate.

I saw the movement on the ball, but swung too late to catch up.

Strike one.

I slid my hands back down the barrel and pointed at Dad. "Another one," I said.

Dad nodded.

Same pitch. This time, I swung earlier but got underneath it, fouling it behind me.

Strike two.

"Time," I said, backing away from the plate. I took two practice cuts.

On the mound, Dad wiped his hands on his jeans, then went to work. He planted his left foot, lifted his right leg, and with an extra kick, whipped his third pitch toward me.

Wait for it, I told myself, expecting the ball to break away again. But the ball never broke. It barreled straight down the middle of the strike zone. By the time I saw my mistake, it was too late. I took a hack, but the ball chugged past me. It slammed against the top plank of the backstop, then ricocheted halfway back to the plate.

Strike three.

Down on three pitches. Ouch. I stood at the plate, staring at my shoes. I would have to do better than that when baseball season started. I was on the Pilchuck All-Star team, and I knew from last season that the pitchers threw some serious smoke. It was nothing like the rec league games I had seen my friends Kenny and Fish play in, where the pitches came in nice and easy. I had to be ready. Just yesterday Coach Burke had told me he expected big things from me this season.

Holding the bat in one hand, I picked up the ball and tossed it to Dad.

"Not bad for an old-timer, huh?" he said.

"The sun was in my eyes," I joked as we began gathering up the rest of the baseballs scattered around the infield.

"Face it, Roy," Dad said, patting his stomach. "Your old man's still got it."

"You mean that?" I asked, pointing to his gut.

Dad rubbed his belly. "This?" he asked proudly, pointing to himself. "This is all muscle."

"I didn't know fat was a muscle," I said.

"It was enough to strike you out," Dad said as he put his arm around me. "And believe me, that's not easy."

"Well, don't let it go to your head," I said.

Dad dropped a dozen baseballs into a canvas bag. "I'm serious, Roy. I know how talented you are and how hard you work. I'm proud of you."

Just then, I heard the sound of a car door opening in the small parking lot beside the field. Quickly, I spotted Mom plowing toward us like a one-woman army.

"Incoming," I said to Dad, who had his back to her.

Dad looked up, then muttered something under his breath. "What time is it?" he asked.

"Time for you to say a prayer," I told him.

Mom and Dad had been divorced for five years, but they both still lived in Pilchuck. That meant my sixteen-year-old sister, Sara, and I lived by the schedule. Every other weekend with Dad, the rest of the time with Mom.

That afternoon, I was supposed to be home by five o'clock for dinner and homework--even though it was Friday. It was sundown now, which meant it was at least seven-thirty.

Oops.

Giving me the stay hand, Dad jogged over to meet Mom. "We're just wrapping it up," he said. "I guess we lost track of time."

"Lost track of time?" Mom repeated. "Mike, you sound like one of the kids."

Mom and Dad were standing face to face on the first baseline like an ump and a manager going nose to nose over a close call. I was hovering near the pitcher's mound.

"Tee," he said. "Relax."

Mom's name was Teresa. I knew she didn't like Dad's nickname for her, but I had heard her call him worse. Things had never gotten super ugly between them, but there had definitely been a lot of shouting.

"We had a deal, Mike. Roy was supposed to be at home an hour and a half ago. He has homework to do."

"It's Friday," said Dad. "He has all weekend."

"Yes, but you and I both know he'll be out here playing baseball all weekend. Then it's Sunday night and nothing's gotten done."

Dad held up his hands. "Okay," he said, waving the white flag, "he's all yours." Then he turned to me and whistled, like I hadn't been able to hear every word of their conversation. "Let's call it a day," he said.

Knowing I had no choice, I made my way over to Mom.

"Hi, sweetie," she said, reaching up to me. Unlike my brown hair, her hair was blond and down to her shoulders.

"I'll be in the car," she told us.

"We'll pick this up later," Dad said after Mom walked away.

"Tomorrow?"

Dad shook his head. "Next week."

"What's wrong with tomorrow?"

"I have a . . . an appointment."

"You mean a date."

Dad was quiet for a second. "You're right," he admitted after a moment. "I mean a date."

"With the teacher?" I asked.

"With Camille," said Dad, nodding.

As far as I could tell, Camille had been in the picture for about a month. But Dad was already talking about introducing her to me and Sara.

"If it was me, I'd rather play baseball," I said.

"Next week, Roy. I promise."

I wondered why he couldn't make the date wait instead of me, but I couldn't find the right way to say it. Dad and I were pros at joking around but not so good at talking about feelings. "Make sure you wear a big shirt so your muscles don't hang out."

Dad laughed and gave me a quick hug. We left it with a fist bump. Then I turned and walked across the grass to the car, where Mom was waiting.


From the Hardcover edition.

Continues...

Excerpted from Roy Morelli Steps Up to the Plate by Thatcher Heldring Copyright © 2010 by Thatcher Heldring. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)