Royal Guide to Spot and Stain Removal

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The Royal Guide to Spot and Stain Removal

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Overview

"Out, damned spot!"

For some, it's an obsession. For the Queen of Clean® it's a snap! Now you can tame even the most vexing spots and stains with this handy pocket guide, drawn from the royal bestsellers Talking Dirty with the Queen of Clean® and Talking Dirty Laundry iwith the Queen of Clean®. Here are Her Majesty's most sought-after stain removal secrets — in one portable companion!

Banish Stubborn Stains:

  • mustard
  • wine
  • spaghetti sauce
  • lipstick
  • grass stains
  • chewing gum
  • ink
  • chocolate
  • grease
  • tar
  • rust
  • nail polish
  • coffee and tea
  • and so many more!

Discover Magical Solutions:

Lemon juice, shampoo, salt, vinegar, and other inexpensive, effective spot treatments make light work — and are waiting in your pantry!

Pamper Your Washables:

From silk sheets to cotton tees, wool sweaters to suede jackets, consult the Queen's sage advice on fabric types — and lift stains from all your belongings with tender loving care!

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Did you ever want a little book of stain removal tips to keep at hand in your laundry? Good news: Linda Cobb, the self-styled Queen of Clean®, has granted your wish. This pocket-size book draws from all the stain removal advice in Cobb's previous bestsellers, and now none of us will ever have to memorize the recipe for grease removal --- we can just look it up.

The book consists of three parts: a guide to stain removers; a section on cleaning different fabrics; and an A-to-Z spot and stain removal guide. Cobb's principles are simple: Not all stains are created equal (so treat an ink spot differently from a grease spot), and consider the fabric first (different fabrics deserve a different approach).

In her role as a stain stalker, Cobb has tried almost every product you can think of, so she can write knowledgeably about best uses of commercial products. She is also fond of secret stain removal products already in your cupboard, like baking soda, club soda, WD-40, salt, and shaving cream.

Cobb also offers homemade recipes for stain removers for washable fabrics. Here's her recipe for a Beverage, Fruit, and Grass Remover:

  1. Combine equal portions of:
    • white vinegar
    • dishwashing soap
    • water
  2. Shake well and work the solution into the spot. Let stand a few minutes and then launder as usual.
Cobb has tips for removing stains caused by barbecue sauce, nail polish, ink, ice cream, wine, Silly Putty, tar, and a lot more. Here's my tip: If you choose to lead your life by stain removal considerations, you should consider giving up mustard -- it's a stain even the Queen of Clean® finds hard to remove. (Ginger Curwen)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780743437837
  • Publisher: Pocket Books
  • Publication date: 10/28/2001
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Pages: 128
  • Product dimensions: 4.20 (w) x 6.60 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One: Stain Removers That Are Hiding in Your Cupboard

Some of the very best spot and stain removers are things you use every single day! These stain removers work great and they're right at your fingertips!

Alcohol: Rubbing alcohol is great for grass stains and so much more.

Ammonia: The perspiration stain fighter.

Automatic dishwasher detergent: Keep this on hand as a bleach substitute and whitener/ brightener even if you don't have a dishwasher. Liquid, powder, and tablet form all work well. If you choose the tablet, make sure it has dissolved before you add clothes. Pour directly on stain, or soak.

Baking soda: Removes odors.

Club soda: My favorite Oh my gosh, how did I do that? spotter. Use it on any fabric or surface that can be treated with water. A slight dabbing on dry-clean-only fabrics is also permissible, just be sure to test first! Use club soda on any spill — ask the waiter for some if you're dining out — dab it on and blot it off. Club soda keeps spills from becoming stains and brings the offending spill to the surface so it can be easily removed. It's totally safe. I always make sure to have a bottle on hand.

Cream of tartar: I bet you have some of this in the kitchen cupboard, but how often do you use it? Well, here's your chance. Mix cream of tartar with lemon juice and you have a wonderful bleach for white clothes spotted with food or other stains. It's even effective on many rust stains.

Denture-cleaning tablets: The cure-all for white table linens with food stains and white cotton with stains. Dissolve one tablet per1/2 cup water. Pour directly on stain or spot.

Dishwashing liquid: A wonderful spotter, used undiluted on tough stains.

Glycerin: You can remove tar, tree sap (think Christmas tree), juice stains, mustard, ketchup and barbecue sauce.

GOJO Crème Waterless Hand Cleaner®: Totally awesome for removing grease and oil, including shoe polish.

Hydrogen peroxide: 3 percent hydrogen peroxide is super for removing bloodstains, especially if they are fairly fresh. It also is a wonderful bleaching agent for stubborn stains on white clothes. Combine 1/2 cup of hydrogen peroxide and 1 teaspoon of ammonia for an unbeatable stain removal combination. Make sure to use 3 percent and not the kind you use to bleach your hair!

Lemon juice: This is nature's bleach and disinfectant. I don't know where we'd be without it. If you have spots on white clothes, apply some lemon juice and lay them in the sun. Apply a little more lemon juice prior to laundering, or prespray and launder as usual. This is really effective on baby formula stains.

Meat tenderizer: A combo of meat tenderizer (unseasoned, please, or you'll have a whole new stain!) and cold water is just the answer to protein-based stains such as blood, milk, etc.

Salt: Sprinkling salt on spilled red wine will keep the wine from staining until you can launder it. Mixed with lemon juice, salt will remove mildew stains.

Shampoo: Any brand will do. Cheap is fine. I save the small bottles from hotel/motel stays and keep them in the laundry room. Great for treating ring-around-the-collar, mud and cosmetic stains.

Shave cream: That innocent-looking can of shave cream in your bathroom is one of the best spot and stain removers available. That's because it's really whipped soap! If you have a spill on your clothes (or even your carpet), moisten the spot, work in some shave cream, and then flush it with cool water. If the offending spot is on something you're wearing, work the shave cream in and then use a clean cloth (a washcloth works fine) to blot the shave cream and the spot away. A quick touch of the blow-dryer to prevent a ring and you're on your way. The best thing about shave cream is that even if it doesn't work it won't set the stain, so the spot can still be removed later. Keep a small sample can in your suitcase when you travel. It's saved me more than once!

WD-40 Lubricant®: Check out your garage or the "fix-it" cupboard. If you don't have any, pick up a can the next time you're at the hardware store or home center. Why? Because we've all had those nasty grease stains and oil stains on clothes: Salad dressing misses the salad and gets the blouse, or grease splatters when you are cooking — or crayon/lipstick/Chap Stick® gets on your clothes! WD-40 is your answer. Spray some on, wait 10 minutes, and then work in undiluted liquid dishwashing soap and launder as usual. Works well on everything except silk!

White vinegar: A great spotter for suede — used undiluted. It's also a wonderful fabric softener. Just put 1/4 cup white vinegar in the final rinse. (And no, you won't smell like a salad!)

It's worthwhile to keep these things on hand. As you can see, most are inexpensive and have other uses. They'll make you the laundry Queen — or King! — in your home.

Copyright © 2001 by Linda Cobb

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Contents

Introduction

Part I — Stain Removers

1. Stain Removers That Are Hiding in Your Cupboard

2. Be a Spot Hot Shot!

3. Bringing Out the Big Guns

4. Bleach 101: Whiter Whites, Brighter Brights

Part II — Cleaning Guide for Fabric Types

Part III — A to Z Palace Spot and Stain Removal Guide

Resource Guide

Read More Show Less

First Chapter

Chapter One: Stain Removers That Are Hiding in Your Cupboard

Some of the very best spot and stain removers are things you use every single day! These stain removers work great and they're right at your fingertips!

Alcohol: Rubbing alcohol is great for grass stains and so much more.

Ammonia: The perspiration stain fighter.

Automatic dishwasher detergent: Keep this on hand as a bleach substitute and whitener/ brightener even if you don't have a dishwasher. Liquid, powder, and tablet form all work well. If you choose the tablet, make sure it has dissolved before you add clothes. Pour directly on stain, or soak.

Baking soda: Removes odors.

Club soda: My favorite Oh my gosh, how did I do that? spotter. Use it on any fabric or surface that can be treated with water. A slight dabbing on dry-clean-only fabrics is also permissible, just be sure to test first! Use club soda on any spill -- ask the waiter for some if you're dining out -- dab it on and blot it off. Club soda keeps spills from becoming stains and brings the offending spill to the surface so it can be easily removed. It's totally safe. I always make sure to have a bottle on hand.

Cream of tartar: I bet you have some of this in the kitchen cupboard, but how often do you use it? Well, here's your chance. Mix cream of tartar with lemon juice and you have a wonderful bleach for white clothes spotted with food or other stains. It's even effective on many rust stains.

Denture-cleaning tablets: The cure-all for white table linens with food stains and white cotton with stains. Dissolve one tablet per 1/2 cup water. Pour directly on stain or spot.

Dishwashing liquid: A wonderful spotter, used undiluted on tough stains.

Glycerin: You can remove tar, tree sap (think Christmas tree), juice stains, mustard, ketchup and barbecue sauce.

GOJO Crème Waterless Hand Cleaner®: Totally awesome for removing grease and oil, including shoe polish.

Hydrogen peroxide: 3 percent hydrogen peroxide is super for removing bloodstains, especially if they are fairly fresh. It also is a wonderful bleaching agent for stubborn stains on white clothes. Combine 1/2 cup of hydrogen peroxide and 1 teaspoon of ammonia for an unbeatable stain removal combination. Make sure to use 3 percent and not the kind you use to bleach your hair!

Lemon juice: This is nature's bleach and disinfectant. I don't know where we'd be without it. If you have spots on white clothes, apply some lemon juice and lay them in the sun. Apply a little more lemon juice prior to laundering, or prespray and launder as usual. This is really effective on baby formula stains.

Meat tenderizer: A combo of meat tenderizer (unseasoned, please, or you'll have a whole new stain!) and cold water is just the answer to protein-based stains such as blood, milk, etc.

Salt: Sprinkling salt on spilled red wine will keep the wine from staining until you can launder it. Mixed with lemon juice, salt will remove mildew stains.

Shampoo: Any brand will do. Cheap is fine. I save the small bottles from hotel/motel stays and keep them in the laundry room. Great for treating ring-around-the-collar, mud and cosmetic stains.

Shave cream: That innocent-looking can of shave cream in your bathroom is one of the best spot and stain removers available. That's because it's really whipped soap! If you have a spill on your clothes (or even your carpet), moisten the spot, work in some shave cream, and then flush it with cool water. If the offending spot is on something you're wearing, work the shave cream in and then use a clean cloth (a washcloth works fine) to blot the shave cream and the spot away. A quick touch of the blow-dryer to prevent a ring and you're on your way. The best thing about shave cream is that even if it doesn't work it won't set the stain, so the spot can still be removed later. Keep a small sample can in your suitcase when you travel. It's saved me more than once!

WD-40 Lubricant®: Check out your garage or the "fix-it" cupboard. If you don't have any, pick up a can the next time you're at the hardware store or home center. Why? Because we've all had those nasty grease stains and oil stains on clothes: Salad dressing misses the salad and gets the blouse, or grease splatters when you are cooking -- or crayon/lipstick/Chap Stick® gets on your clothes! WD-40 is your answer. Spray some on, wait 10 minutes, and then work in undiluted liquid dishwashing soap and launder as usual. Works well on everything except silk!

White vinegar: A great spotter for suede -- used undiluted. It's also a wonderful fabric softener. Just put 1/4 cup white vinegar in the final rinse. (And no, you won't smell like a salad!)


It's worthwhile to keep these things on hand. As you can see, most are inexpensive and have other uses. They'll make you the laundry Queen -- or King! -- in your home.

Copyright © 2001 by Linda Cobb

Read More Show Less

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2011

    Good stain removal but lots of specialized products

    The book has solutions to many stains one finds around the house. While most tasks are covered with common household products (using lemon juice to remove rust) others rely on specialized products. If you have read Talking Dirty With the Queen of Clean this will be a rehash. I would recommend this later book instead.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 12, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

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