Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam

Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam

3.6 15
by Omar Khayyam
     
 

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One of the best-known, most often quoted English classics. Edward FitzGerald's free translation of skeptical, hedonistic verse attributed to Omar Khayyam (1048—1122), Persian mathematician, astronomer and philosopher. Fifth edition incorporates FitzGerald's handwritten changes in the fourth edition, and is traditionally printed with the first edition. Notes…  See more details below

Overview

One of the best-known, most often quoted English classics. Edward FitzGerald's free translation of skeptical, hedonistic verse attributed to Omar Khayyam (1048—1122), Persian mathematician, astronomer and philosopher. Fifth edition incorporates FitzGerald's handwritten changes in the fourth edition, and is traditionally printed with the first edition. Notes explaining Persian names and unfamiliar terms.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"An attractive new edition with a lengthy essay by Tony Briggs, who characterises the poem, memorably, as 'the story of the apocalypse told to us by a kind uncle.'"  —Daily Mail

"A lovely new edition . . . Professor Briggs does us all a favour by putting before our red and weary eyes FitzGerald and this legacy from an older Iran."  —Times

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781314079326
Publisher:
HardPress Publishing
Publication date:
01/28/2013
Pages:
150
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.32(d)

Meet the Author

Anthony Briggs, Emeritus Professor of Russian at Birmingham University, Senior Research Fellow at Bristol University, is a well-known writer and broadcaster on Russian cultural affairs and European poetry. His recent translation of WAR AND PEACE was critically acclaimed. Among his many publications are six editions in the Everyman poetry series.

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The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam (Barnes & Noble Edition) 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 15 reviews.
jharlam More than 1 year ago
The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam is among the few masterpieces that has been translated into most languages, including English, French, German, Italian, Russian, Chinese, Hindi, Arabic, and Urdu.

The most famous translation of the Rubaiyat from Farsi into English was undertaken in 1859 by Edward J. Fitzgerald. It appears that in many of his translations, he has combined a few of the Rubaiyat to compose one, and sometimes it is difficult to trace and correspond the original to the translated version. However, he has tried his utmost to adhere to the spirit of the original poetry.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I cannot fathom how this ancient classic hasn't been rated before now. The simplistic way that the 'AABA' poetry pattern was used to tell a story is an easy yet ingenius way to appeal to children and adults alike. Paradise Lost may be too difficult for some to understand, but this (also a story told in poem form) is relatively 'reader friendly' using poems, it tells tales and it is most interesting. I have the 1947 edition of this and every once in a while I pick it up. Even for a child who can't read, the lifelike pictures are enough to inspire interest. Omar, son of Abraham, certainly had something when he wrote this book and Edward Fitzgerald did as well when he brought it to English readers. Parents should now bring this book to their children if only to enlighten them and to keep its contents alive.
DoeReid More than 1 year ago
I found it easier to understand one verse at a time and then put things together as I read for the "el grande mosaic".
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JodiK More than 1 year ago
The Rubaiyat in itself is a beautiful story. The way that Fitzgerald illustrates this interpretation, can be of the utmost importance to a person in recovery. An alocholic sees the love affair with the booze, and can vivdly see how the moving hand having writ cannot erase a line.......means wasted life. Excellent Excellent, I use illustrations in recovery groups and sessions. Cant get any better than that....they work....
Anonymous More than 1 year ago