Rubber Factory

( 8 )

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David Sprague
Often lazily compared to the White Stripes -- by virtue of a two-piece lineup and a penchant for digging several layers into the muck to turn up deeply sunk roots -- this Akron-bred duo actually cough up an entirely different strain of thud, one marked more by brawling than introspection. Frontman Dan Auerbach isn't afraid to get down-and-dirty, unleashing his own take on a black-snake moan on the eerie "When the Lights Go Out" and capturing the backwoods vibe of the blues classic "Grown So Ugly" with eyebrow-raising faithfulness. The Keys don't, however, try to pass themselves off as Mississippi Delta throwbacks. While they're well versed in the lexicon of the blues ...
See more details below
Vinyl LP
$17.09
BN.com price
(Save 5%)$17.99 List Price
Other sellers (Vinyl LP)
  • All (3) from $14.22   
  • New (3) from $14.22   

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David Sprague
Often lazily compared to the White Stripes -- by virtue of a two-piece lineup and a penchant for digging several layers into the muck to turn up deeply sunk roots -- this Akron-bred duo actually cough up an entirely different strain of thud, one marked more by brawling than introspection. Frontman Dan Auerbach isn't afraid to get down-and-dirty, unleashing his own take on a black-snake moan on the eerie "When the Lights Go Out" and capturing the backwoods vibe of the blues classic "Grown So Ugly" with eyebrow-raising faithfulness. The Keys don't, however, try to pass themselves off as Mississippi Delta throwbacks. While they're well versed in the lexicon of the blues -- as borne out by the lashing slide guitar that permeates "The Lengths" -- they're also capable of pulling a U-turn to home in on a sweet version of the Kinks' "Act Nice and Gentle." They don't take the advice proffered in that song's title all that often, though, which makes Rubber Factory every bit as hardscrabble as the band's bloodied-but-unbowed hometown -- every broken factory window and closing-time bust-up of which can be heard in the disc's grooves.
All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
It's easy to think of the Black Keys as the flip side of the White Stripes. They both hail from the Midwest, they both work a similar garage blues ground and both have color-coded names. If they're not quite kissing cousins, they're certainly kindred spirits, and they're following surprisingly similar career arcs, as the Keys' third album, Rubber Factory, is neatly analogous to the Stripes' third album breakthrough, White Blood Cells. Rubber Factory finds the duo expanding, stretching, and improving, coming into its own as a distinctive, original, thoroughly great rock & roll band. With 2003's Thickfreakness, guitarist/vocalist Dan Auerbach and drummer/producer Patrick Carney delivered on the promise of a raw, exciting debut by sharpening their sound and strengthening the songwriting, thereby upping the ante for their next record, and Rubber Factory doesn't disappoint. Instead, it surprises in a number of delightful ways, redefining the duo without losing the essence of the band. For instance, the production has more shades than either The Big Come Up or Thickfreakness -- witness the creepy late-night vibe of the opening "When the Lights Go Out" or how the spare, heartbroken, and slide guitar-laden "The Lengths" sounds like it's been rusted over -- but it's also harder, nastier, and uglier than those albums, piled with truly brutal, gut-level guitar. Yet through these sheets of noise, vulnerability pokes through, not just on "The Lengths," but in a lazy, loping, terrific version of the Kinks' "Act Nice and Gentle." And, like their cover of the Beatles' "She Said, She Said" on their debut, "Act Nice and Gentle" illustrates that even if the Black Keys have more legit blues credentials than any of their peers, they're nevertheless an indie rock band raised with not just a knowledge of classic rock, but with excellent taste and, most importantly, an instinct for what makes great rock & roll. They know that sound matters, not just how a band plays but how a band is recorded, and that blues sounds better when it's unvarnished, which is why each of their records feels more like a real blues album than anything cut since the '60s. But they're not revivalists, either. They've absorbed the language of classic rock and the sensibility of indie rock -- they're turning familiar sounds into something nervy and fresh, music that builds on the past yet lives fearlessly in the moment. On a sheer gut level, they're intoxicating and that alone would be enough to make Rubber Factory a strong listen, but what makes it transcendent is that Auerbach has developed into such a fine songwriter. His songs have enough melodic and lyrical twists to make it seem like he's breaking rules, but his trick is that he's doing this within traditional blues-rock structures. He's not just reinvigorating a familiar form, he's doing it without a lick of pretension; it never seems as if the songs were written, but that they've always existed and have just been discovered, which is true of any great blues song. Carney gives these songs the production they deserve -- some tunes are dense and heavy with guitars, others are spacious and haunting -- and the result is the most exciting and best rock & roll record of 2004.
Entertainment Weekly - David Browne
It's pretty nervy to take a crack at writing a barroom ballad ("Stack Shot Billy") as well as cover genuine blues ("Grown So Ugly") and make it appear seamless and without affectation. Somewhere, George Thorogood is sobbing. (A)

It's pretty nervy to take a crack at writing a barroom ballad ("Stack Shot Billy") as well as cover genuine blues ("Grown So Ugly") and make it appear seamless and without affectation. Somewhere, George Thorogood is sobbing. (A)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 9/7/2004
  • Label: Fat Possum Records
  • UPC: 045778037919
  • Catalog Number: 80379
  • Sales rank: 21,208

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 When the Lights Go Out
  2. 2 10 A.M. Automatic
  3. 3 Just Couldn't Tie Me Down
  4. 4 All Hands Against His Own
  5. 5 The Desperate Man
  6. 6 Girl Is on My Mind
  7. 7 The Lengths
  8. 8 Grown So Ugly
  9. 9 Stack Shot Billy
  10. 10 Act Nice and Gentle
  11. 11 Aeroplane Blues
  12. 12 Keep Me
  13. 13 Till I Get My Way
Read More Show Less

Album Credits

Performance Credits
The Black Keys Primary Artist
Patrick Carney Percussion, Drums, Hand Clapping, Group Member
Dan Auerbach Fiddle, Guitar, Vocals, Hand Clapping, Lap Steel Guitar, Group Member
Technical Credits
Ray Davies Composer
Greg Calbi Mastering
Robert Pete Williams Composer
The Black Keys Producer, Audio Production
Patrick Carney Composer, Sound Effects, Engineer
Dan Auerbach Composer, Sound Effects
Michael Carney Artwork
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 8 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(6)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2011

    Best Rock and Roll in 35 years

    I grew up in the late 60's with the Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin, Kinks, and other groups that had a blues touch to them including currently Joss Stone. I occasionally bought CD's over the years but only enjoyed 2-3 tracks on each one. When I bought this CD I was blown away by every song. This was raw, powerful, bluesy rock and roll. It was not refined like other groups; it has a raw, basic feel to it. I finally found great rock and roll; it is the best album I have purchased since the early 70's. It is nice to see raw rock and roll is not dead!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A true piece of the Blues!!!

    I have been searching for a band like this for so long. Finally I found it! The Black Keys take a classic approach to the blues. This two-piece band keeps it simple with songs like 10 am automatic and when the lights go out.Though my favorite track off the album is Grown so ugly the Captain Beefheart cover song {almost better than the original} This is band is always being lazyly compared to the white stripes. But in reality they have very styles. Go buy this album!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 28, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews