Rube Goldberg Machines: Essays in Mormon Theology [NOOK Book]

Overview

Doing theology is like building a comically circuitous Rube Goldberg machine: you spend your time tinkering together an unnecessarily complicated, impractical, and ingenious apparatus for doing things that are, in themselves, simple. But there is a kind of joy in theology?s gratuity, there is a pleasure in its comedic machination, and ultimately?if the balloon pops, the hamster spins, the chain pulls, the bucket empties, the pulley lifts, and (voila!) the book?s page is turned?some measurable kind of work is ...
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Rube Goldberg Machines: Essays in Mormon Theology

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Overview

Doing theology is like building a comically circuitous Rube Goldberg machine: you spend your time tinkering together an unnecessarily complicated, impractical, and ingenious apparatus for doing things that are, in themselves, simple. But there is a kind of joy in theology’s gratuity, there is a pleasure in its comedic machination, and ultimately—if the balloon pops, the hamster spins, the chain pulls, the bucket empties, the pulley lifts, and (voila!) the book’s page is turned—some measurable kind of work is accomplished. But this work is a byproduct. The beauty of the machine, like all beauty, is for its own sake.

Theology, maybe especially Mormon theology, requires this kind of modesty. The Church neither needs nor endorses our Rube Goldbergian flights. The comic aspect of the arrows we wing at cloudy skies must be kept firmly in mind. The comedy of it both saves us from theology and commends us to it.

Engaged in this work, theology has only one definitive strength: it can make simple things difficult. Good theology forces detours that divert us from our stated goals and prompt us to visit places and include people that would otherwise be left aside. The measure of this strength is charity. Theological detours are worth only as much charity as they are able to show. They are worth only as many waylaid lives and lost objects as they are able to embrace. Rube Goldberg machines, models of inelegance, are willing to loop anything into the circuit—tax collectors, prostitutes, lepers, Democrats, whatever. In charity, the grace of a disinterested concern for others and the gratuity of an unnecessary complication coincide. Theology helps us to find religion by helping us to lose it. Theology makes the familiar strange. It ratchets uncomfortable questions into complementary shapes and helps recover the trouble that is charity’s substance.

This book is itself a Rube Goldberg machine, pieced together from a variety of essays written over the past ten years. They offer explicit reflections on what it means to practice theology as a modern Mormon scholar and they stake out substantial and original positions on the nature of the atonement, the soul, testimony, eternal marriage, humanism, and the historicity of the Book of Mormon.
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Editorial Reviews

James L. Faulconer - James Faulconer
As a stylist, Miller gives Nietzsche a run for his money. As a believer, Miller is as submissive as Augustine hearing a child’s voice in the garden. Miller is a theologian of the ordinary, thinking about our ordinary beliefs in very non-ordinary ways while never insisting that the ordinary become extra-ordinary.
Richard L. Bushman - Richard Bushman
Adam Miller is the most original and provocative Latter-day Saint theologian practicing today.
Terryl L. Givens - Terryl Givens
The value of Miller’s writings is in the modesty he both exhibits and projects onto the theological enterprise, even while showing its joyfully disruptive potential. Conventional Mormon minds may not resonate with every line of poetry and provocation—but Miller surely afflicts the comfortable, which is the theologian’s highest end.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940014226233
  • Publisher: Greg Kofford Books
  • Publication date: 4/5/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 1,083,962
  • File size: 4 MB

Meet the Author

ADAM S. MILLER is a professor of philosophy at Collin College in McKinney, Texas. He is the author of Badiou, Marion, and St. Paul: Immanent Grace and Speculative Grace: An Experiment with Bruno Latour in Object-Oriented Theology, editor of An Experiment on the Word: Reading Alma 32, and director of the Mormon Theology Seminar.
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 17, 2014

    Highly Recommended

    Miller's essays artfully explain Mormon doctrine in ways that are profound and interesting to the reader. For serious students of Christian theology this is a must read.

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  • Posted July 30, 2012

    Adam Miller manages to weave together philosophy and worship in

    Adam Miller manages to weave together philosophy and worship in a manner that is both devotionally applicable for the religious believer and philosophically interesting for even atheistic thinkers.

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