Rubens in London: Art and Diplomacy

Hardcover (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$145.00
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $144.99
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (5) from $144.99   
  • New (4) from $144.99   
  • Used (1) from $144.99   

More About This Textbook

Overview

The Flemish artist Peter Paul Rubens is probably the most important foreign artist to have worked in England. The story of how this came to be, of what he did when he was in England and what he painted for King Charles I is the story of this book. Charles and his father, the first Stuart monarchs of Great Britain, led and promoted a great wave of interest in the arts, in particular the visual arts, that culminated in Rubens painting nine large canvases to decorate the ceiling of Inigo Jones's Banqetting Hall, the ceremonial centre of the Court in Whitehall - a monument that is still intact today. It is this cycle, an hitherto unappreciated masterpiece of Baroque state art, that is the focus of this book. How Rubens came to obtain the commission is a tale of international politics and diplomacy in which the artist himself played a significant role. The author relates these complex political relationships and missions with great insight and clarity, and in doing so also describes the cultural and social setting in which Rubens found himself while in London. The illustrations that accompany the text include not only many of Rubens's own paintings and drawings made when he was in London, but also some of the now well-known works by the Italian and North European Renaissance masters that Rubens would have seen in the magnificent art collections of the King and the English aristocracy. Foremost however among the illustrations are the reproductions of the Banqueting Hall ceiling itself: these are mostly in colour, showing each of the three central scenes both complete and with striking details that would be difficult to see in the Hall itself. Also the corner oval painting as well as the long, celebratory, exuberant processions on either side are reproduced in colour and in detail, so that the reader, guided by the author's full descriptions and interpretations, can experience a unique viewing and understanding of Rubens's masterpiece.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781905375042
  • Publisher: Brepols Publishers
  • Publication date: 9/24/2011
  • Series: Studies in Baroque Art Series , #2
  • Pages: 205
  • Product dimensions: 8.50 (w) x 11.20 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

The Author, Gregory Martin, has been interested in the ceiling paintings of the Banquetting Hall ever since he worked at the National Gallery in the 1960s, when he wrote the catalogue of the Gallery's Flemish paintings. Towards the end of his subsequent career at Christie's, where he was a director concerned with old master paintings, he was commissioned to write the Corpus Rubenianum volume on the ceiling decoration of the Banquetting Hall which was published in 2005. In the present book he returns to the subject, treating it and the related matter of Rubens in London in a way designed to appeal to a wider readership.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)