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Rubia and the Three Osos
     

Rubia and the Three Osos

by Susan Middleton Elya, Melissa Sweet (Illustrator)
 

The Oso family is going out for a stroll, and Rubia has her eye on their empty casita. A nice bowl of sopa, a comfortable chair, a perfecta little bed Who wouldn't want to open la puerta and come in?

This is the story of Goldilocks and the Three Bears, retold in a musical combination of English and Spanish, illustrated

Overview

The Oso family is going out for a stroll, and Rubia has her eye on their empty casita. A nice bowl of sopa, a comfortable chair, a perfecta little bed Who wouldn't want to open la puerta and come in?

This is the story of Goldilocks and the Three Bears, retold in a musical combination of English and Spanish, illustrated with great humor and heart by a Caldecott Honor-winning artist, and featuring a surprise ending that's downright fabuloso. Just right for bilingual families, new Spanish speakers, and anyone who likes a bueno twist on a classic.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Elya's verse doesn't miss a beat as she delivers a playful slang- and Spanish-inflected retelling of Goldilocks and the Three Bears. While the bears are out for a pre-dinner walk, Little Miss Rubia makes herself at home: "She opened la puerta and saw the fine food./ ‘¡Sopa!' she said. ‘I am so in the mood!' " Rubia escapes when the bears return home, but makes amends for her bad behavior, leading Papá to tell her, "Our house es tu casa." With highlights of bright magenta, green, and orange, Sweet's mixed-media artwork amplifies the characters' delight, anger, and guilt, and Elya's pitch-perfect verse will have readers clamoring for seconds. Ages 3–7. (Sept.)
From the Publisher
Elya's verse doesn't miss a beat as she delivers a playful slang- and Spanish-inflected retelling of Goldilocks and the Three Bears. While the bears are out for a pre-dinner walk, Little Miss Rubia makes herself at home: "She opened la puerta and saw the fine food./ Sopa!' she said. I am so in the mood!' " Rubia escapes when the bears return home, but makes amends for her bad behavior, leading Pap to tell her, "Our house es tu casa." With highlights of bright magenta, green, and orange, Sweet's mixed-media artwork amplifies the characters' delight, anger, and guilt, and Elya's pitch-perfect verse will have readers clamoring for seconds.—PW

The perennially popular "Goldilocks and the Three Bears" assumes a Spanish accent in this contemporary retelling. Framed in clever rhyming text, the familiar classic introduces Spanish words to change the flavor of the tale and humorously teach young readers basic Spanish vocabulary. In this version, the three osos live by themselves and decide to take a stroll before dinner. While the osos are out, Rubia with curls of oro boldly trespasses into their casita, discovers their platos of sopa, finishes off bebe's sopa, breaks bebe's silla and falls asleep in bebe's cama until the three osos return and chase her away. However, unlike the original Goldilocks, Rubia makes amends by taking homemade sopa to the osos along with a heartfelt lo siento. Pencil, watercolor and collage illustrations are packed with Southwest detail and rendered in fiesta colors, adding Latin flair, while the overtly comic depiction of the three osos and Rubia in her red cowgirl boots contributes to the lighthearted humor. All pedagogy should be this palatable.—Kirkus

A marvelous retelling of "Goldilocks and the Three Bears" with a lively bilingual twist. Rubia makes herself at home while the three osos go out for a stroll. Where the original story concludes with confrontation and flight, Elya's surprise ending offers conflict resolution and friendship. The narrative includes bouncy rhythms and smoothly intersperses Spanish words into the English. This technique helps children use context to determine their meaning. The book will also help preschoolers grasp the concept of opposites while expanding their vocabularies in both languages. Spanish is printed in a purple font, and a glossary is provided in the back. The mixed-media illustrations capture the bright colors of Southwestern landscapes and designs as well as the cheerful tone of the story. Sweet also adds nice regional details, such as Rubia's cowgirl boots and cacti scattered throughout the pictures. An excellent read-aloud for storyhours and family reading times.—SLJ

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
In this version of the traditional tale of Goldilocks and the three bears, the basic story is told in jaunty rhymed couplets. But Spanish words are substituted for the English here and there throughout. Readers can probably understand them if they know the story, but there is a glossary with pronunciation at the end. The osos go for a walk before dinner because Mama hopes to get thinner. Rubia arrives and finds the smallest bowl of soup "Perfecto!" The smallest bed is "Buena." In this version, Rubia runs away, but feels remorse. Saying, "Lo siento," she returns to the bears' house with soup she has made, along with glue to fix the broken chair. All ends happily, in friendship. Watercolors and mixed media produce scenes where everything: houses, trees, furniture, are all simplified. The characters are also abstracted, emphasizing humor, with round eyes, bulbous bodies, and tiny feet. Rubia is doll-like, with oversize head, skinny neck, and red cowboy boots. Learning some Spanish can be fun here. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
PreS-K—A marvelous retelling of "Goldilocks and the Three Bears" with a lively bilingual twist. Rubia makes herself at home while the three osos go out for a stroll. Where the original story concludes with confrontation and flight, Elya's surprise ending offers conflict resolution and friendship. The narrative includes bouncy rhythms and smoothly intersperses Spanish words into the English. This technique helps children use context to determine their meaning. The book will also help preschoolers grasp the concept of opposites while expanding their vocabularies in both languages. Spanish is printed in a purple font, and a glossary is provided in the back. The mixed-media illustrations capture the bright colors of Southwestern landscapes and designs as well as the cheerful tone of the story. Sweet also adds nice regional details, such as Rubia's cowgirl boots and cacti scattered throughout the pictures. An excellent read-aloud for storyhours and family reading times.—Mary Landrum, Lexington Public Library, KY
Kirkus Reviews

The perennially popular "Goldilocks and the Three Bears" assumes a Spanish accent in this contemporary retelling. Framed in clever rhyming text, the familiar classic introduces Spanish words to change the flavor of the tale and humorously teach young readers basic Spanish vocabulary. In this version, the three osos live by themselves and decide to take a stroll before dinner. While the osos are out, Rubia with curls of oro boldly trespasses into their casita, discovers their platos of sopa, finishes off bebe's sopa, breaks bebe's silla and falls asleep in bebe's cama until the three osos return and chase her away. However, unlike the original Goldilocks, Rubia makes amends by taking homemade sopa to the osos along with a heartfelt lo siento. Pencil, watercolor and collage illustrations are packed with Southwest detail and rendered in fiesta colors, adding Latin flair, while the overtly comic depiction of the three osos and Rubia in her red cowgirl boots contributes to the lighthearted humor. All pedagogy should be this palatable. (glossary) (Picture book. 3-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781423112525
Publisher:
Disney Press
Publication date:
09/07/2010
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
10.10(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
AD450L (what's this?)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

SUSAN MIDDLETON ELYA (www.susanelya.com) spent years teaching Goldilocks and the Three Bears to her beginning Spanish students, since opposites like frio and caliente helped make it easy to learn basic vocabulary. Inspired by her students, she came up with a playful retelling of the story, complete with a happy nueva ending. Susan has written numerous books for children. In her spare time, she runs an antique shop called the Polka Dot Attic in Danville, California.

MELISSA SWEET (www.melissasweet.net) has illustrated more than 70 children's books, including A River of Words: The Story of William Carlos Williams by Jen Bryant, a Caldecott Honor Book and a New York Times Best Illustrated Book. When creating the mixed media paintings for Rubia and The Three Osos, Melissa was inspired by the colors and textures she saw during a trip to the American Southwest. She lives in Maine, where she makes sopa of all kinds.

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