Rude Dude's Book of Food: Stories Behind Some of the Crazy-Cool Stuff We Eat

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Overview

It's actually true that Mongol warriors rode with slabs of raw meat under their saddles then ate them that night in camp! It's actually true that Chinese archaeologists found 4,000-year-old noodles in an overturned cup. It's actually true that Americans buy $1 billion worth of chocolate each Valentine's Day. You think food is just stuff we eat!? Come on! There's a world full of great food stories out there?and Rude Dude's going to tell them!

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Rude Dude's Book of Food: Stories Behind Some of the Crazy-Cool Stuff We Eat

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Overview

It's actually true that Mongol warriors rode with slabs of raw meat under their saddles then ate them that night in camp! It's actually true that Chinese archaeologists found 4,000-year-old noodles in an overturned cup. It's actually true that Americans buy $1 billion worth of chocolate each Valentine's Day. You think food is just stuff we eat!? Come on! There's a world full of great food stories out there—and Rude Dude's going to tell them!

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Rude Dude's Book of Food has powerful and poignant moments in between delightful fun and whimsy! It folds in history, from Alexander the Great to internment camps to the roots of fortune cookies, while focusing on interesting stories about foods kids love. And the tone of the 'Keep Being Awesome' health-tip sidebars was spot on!"

—Barbara M. Burns, Ph.D. Professor and Director of Liberal Studies: Pre-Teaching and Child Studies, Santa Clara University

“Children are exposed to literally thousands of messages about food each year in all types of media. The vast majority of these are marketing messages designed to manipulate and deceive, with the result that most kids have very little knowledge about the food they eat—what it’s made from, what its nutritional value is, and why it was created. Tim J. Myers' Rude Dude's Book of Food has a refreshing new voice that can break through the clutter with kid-friendly, and often sassy, explanations about the history of some of kids’ (and adults') favorite foods. Rude Dude takes us on a journey around the globe to pinpoint key moments in the history of foods like pizza, hamburgers, and chocolate. Myers celebrates the universality of some foods (like chocolate), and describes how different cultures customize them (like noodles/pasta).

Rude Dude celebrates food not for the prize inside the box or the superstar athlete who endorses it, but for authentic reasons’—like people around the world serving it at their celebrations, explorers taking it across oceans to new lands, or, in the words of the Dude himself, its general awesomeness.”

—Katharine E. Heintz, Ph.D.,Department of Communication, Santa Clara University

“I love Tim J. Myers' Rude Dude's Book of Food—it was so much fun to read! There is something about Tim's unique voice that made me want to read more. This style—and this topic—are perfect for children. They can learn this important information and at the same time have fun and be engaged in the book's humor!”

—Christina Ri, Ph.D.,Department of Communication, Santa Clara University

"I found Tim J. Myers' Rude Dude's Book of Food humorous and fun and full of facts about food. In a time when many kids are spending a ton of time on gadgets and texting, not getting proper exercise and a proprer diet, it is so important that they understand that 'they are what they eat.' This book accomplishes that in a straightforward but fun way. Hey, I even learned a fact or two I wasn't aware of . . ."

—Chef James "Jimmy" Canora, Delmonico's, NYC

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781939629210
  • Publisher: Familius
  • Publication date: 9/5/2014
  • Pages: 144
  • Sales rank: 995,075
  • Product dimensions: 5.00 (w) x 7.80 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Tim J. Myers is a writer, storyteller, songwriter, and teacher. He has eleven children’s books out and four on the way, has won numerous awards, and has published fiction, non-fiction, and poetry for children and adults. He lives in Santa Clara, California, is the oldest of eleven children, and can whistle and hum at the same time—though he hasn’t won any awards for that . . . yet.

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Table of Contents

• Chapter 1: Hey, Rude Dude—Why'd You Write This Book?
• Chapter 2: Choc Rocks
• Chapter 3: A Short History of the World from a Hamburger-Lover's
• Chapter 4: Oodles of—What Else?
• Chapter 5: My Nomination for the Snack-Bar Menu in Heaven
• Chapter 6: Let's Wok and Roll
• Chapter 7: One Smart Cookie
• Chapter 8: "Whoa—That Is So Chicken 65!"
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 28, 2014

    SUMMARY ¿ Have you ever wondered where modern pizza came from? D

    SUMMARY – Have you ever wondered where modern pizza came from? Did you know that those “Chinese Fortune Cookies” are originally Japanese? You will learn this and more in this non-fiction book about why food is great. It is filled with miscellaneous information, under different categories, like a chapter about pizza also talks about tomatoes (an ingredient). The book shows food from around the world, to show kids that we are all different, but we all eat FOOD.

    WHAT I THOUGHT – I think that this is a great non-fiction book. I like all of the little tidbits and fun facts about food it has. Did you know that tomatoes were called Golden Apples (after the yellow tomatoes) and thought poisonous for a bit? Did you know that scientists have found 4,000-year-old noodles in China? Oh, and by the way, Rude Dude, the author’s pseudonym, isn’t really rude, he just speaks his mind. And he advises healthy eating, which is another plus. The book is formatted very well, and made it fun to read – there are little fact boxes and poems scattered throughout the book, plus cool pencil/pen illustrations by Jess Smart Smiley that mix well with the text. Mr. Myers has written a fun mini-history of the diversity of food for kids. It would be perfect for reluctant readers, or kids who don’t usually like nonfiction books… or kids like me, who just like to eat. ;) Which reminds me, there is a warning at the front of the book – “This book will probably make you very, very hungry! Good luck with that.”
    *NOTE* I got a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review

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  • Posted September 30, 2014

    This book has a little bit of everything-- history, humor, food

    This book has a little bit of everything-- history, humor, food poems, and trivia about much-loved food that's part of American life. It also has health and nutrition tips—offering encouragement to eat healthier. First of all, it’s about food that kids love and eat often. The language he uses is often quirky, corny, and uses old and new slang to capture the attention of kids.

    It begins with a history of chocolate and there's something new here for a lot of people to find out. I knew about chocolate from the Olmec, the Maya and the Aztecs of the New World. What I didn’t know was it grows in huge pods on trees, that the native peoples mixed it with chiles, used it in ceremonies, and even used it for money. Then the Rude Dude moves on to discuss hamburgers, noodles, pizza, egg rolls, and fortune cookies.

    Throughout the book, Mr. Myers includes more history, humor, and trivia. However, my favorite parts are the little asides called “Keep Being Awesome.” In these set apart sections, he presents the best part of this book, health, exercise, and nutrition tips and pointers. He tells kids that half of what they eat—half of their plate—should be fruits and vegetables. The other half should be grains and protein. This is from the new USDA “My Plate” guidelines—a big improvement over the old and faulty food pyramid that I grew up with. To me, as a health food nut, it doesn’t go quite far enough—like banning sugar--but it’s a beginning.

    This book is recommended for reluctant readers, especially boys in grades 4 -6, who will likely enjoy the quirky and corny humor of the Rude Dude. The illustrations throughout the book, by Jess Smart Smiley, are simple, corny, and cute. Mr. Myers also includes Lesson plan guidance for teachers at the end of the book, showing how his book relates to the Common Core Standards and can be used in the classroom.

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  • Posted September 17, 2014

    This is Rude Dude Book of Food Reviewed by G.C. Krause, Home Eco

    This is Rude Dude Book of Food Reviewed by G.C. Krause, Home Economics teacher.

    Kudos to Mr. Tim Myers for including the specific Common Core standards that relate to his book. It sure helps the teachers in developing lesson plans. His food history book, Rude Dude Book of Food, is written with a quirky voice. The corny jokes and voice inflections of Rude Dude, are a cross between an imaginative character that delivers information about the food kids eat, and the attempt of an adult male trying to speak middle gradesse.

    As a Home Economics teacher, I can appreciate the information about the origins of the food Americans eat, though I’m not sure the delivery has the impact Mr. Myers had hoped it would. Much of the information is squeezed together in paragraphs with other non-relevant information, and though it makes sense to an adult mind, the brains of middle grade kids will have trouble following the logic of some paragraph…(Kit Kat bars, apple pies, England and Kazakhstan, Asia, which relate to the apples in apple pie, which is mentioned as a simile to explain Kit Kat bars. What????)

    Then we have homonyms with genes and jeans, and alliteration with dopey dudes. Though chimpanzees in pants, shopping at the Banana Republic, is cute, humans compared to humans, compared to chimps, all to discuss chocolate is again confusing. Mentioning a topic and the deferring it to a later page doesn’t help the flow of the information.

    The dated phrasings from a 1950’s disc jockey, (Hey, cats and kittens) to a sixties hippie line (peace out) to an eighties comedy (alrighty, then) just don’t compliment the voice of Rude Dude. He sounds too much like an adult man and he’s all over the place. Middle-graders don’t have any idea that cats and kittens might be anything other than cats and kittens. Uncle Scrooge is not a character today’s middle graders would be familiar with. Mr. Myers age comes through in his writing.

    Goof-tacular is a good word for this book, though it isn’t a real word, and neither is alright, the first word of the 2nd chapter. The good intentions of Mr. Myers to teach children the history of food is an excellent concept, but in my opinion, the value of his book is lost in the attempt to deliver it in such a quirky way, the targeted audience gets lost in the phrases and may miss the valuable information. 

    As a Master teacher, I would strongly suggest the classroom instructor read through the book and choose topics they can incorporate in lessons, but I would not recommend it for the students to read on their own.

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