A Rulebook for Arguments / Edition 3

A Rulebook for Arguments / Edition 3

3.0 7
by Anthony Weston
     
 

ISBN-10: 0872205533

ISBN-13: 9780872205536

Pub. Date: 01/01/2001

Publisher: Hackett Publishing Company, Inc.

A Rulebook for Arguments is a succinct introduction to the art of writing and assessing arguments, organized around specific rules, each illustrated and explained soundly but briefly. This widely popular primer--translated into eight languages--remains the first choice in all disciplines for writers who seek straightforward guidance about how to assess

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Overview

A Rulebook for Arguments is a succinct introduction to the art of writing and assessing arguments, organized around specific rules, each illustrated and explained soundly but briefly. This widely popular primer--translated into eight languages--remains the first choice in all disciplines for writers who seek straightforward guidance about how to assess arguments and how to cogently construct them.

The fourth edition offers a revamped and more tightly focused approach to extended arguments, a new chapter on oral arguments, and updated examples and topics throughout.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780872205536
Publisher:
Hackett Publishing Company, Inc.
Publication date:
01/01/2001
Edition description:
REVISED
Pages:
87
Product dimensions:
5.70(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.50(d)

Table of Contents

Prefaceix
Introductionxi
I.Composing a Short Argument: Some General Rules1
1.Distinguish premises and conclusion1
2.Present your ideas in a natural order3
3.Start from reliable premises4
4.Be concrete and concise5
5.Avoid loaded language6
6.Use consistent terms7
7.Stick to one meaning for each term8
II.Arguments by Example10
8.Give more than one example11
9.Use representative examples12
10.Background information is crucial14
11.Consider counterexamples17
III.Arguments by Analogy19
12.Analogy requires a relevantly similar example21
IV.Arguments from Authority24
13.Sources should be cited25
14.Seek informed sources26
15.Seek impartial sources28
16.Cross-check sources30
17.Personal attacks do not disqualify a source30
V.Arguments about Causes32
18.Explain how cause leads to effect33
19.Propose the most likely cause35
20.Correlated events are not necessarily related36
21.Correlated events may have a common cause36
22.Either of two correlated events may cause the other38
23.Causes may be complex38
VI.Deductive Arguments40
24.Modus Ponens41
25.Modus Tollens42
26.Hypothetical Syllogism44
27.Disjunctive Syllogism46
28.Dilemma47
29.Reductio ad absurdum48
30.Deductive arguments in several steps50
VII.Composing an Argumentative Essay
A.Exploring the Issue53
A1.Explore the arguments on all sides of the issue54
A2.Question and defend each argument's premises56
A3.Revise and rethink arguments as they emerge57
VIII.Composing an Argumentative Essay
B.Main Points of the Essay59
B1.Explain the question59
B2.Make a definite claim or proposal60
B3.Develop your arguments fully61
B4.Consider objections62
B5.Consider alternatives63
IX.Composing an Argumentative Essay
C.Writing64
C1.Follow your outline64
C2.Keep the introduction brief65
C3.Give your arguments one at a time65
C4.Clarify, clarify, clarify67
C5.Support objections with arguments68
C6.Don't claim more than you have shown69
X.Fallacies71
The Two Great Fallacies71
Some Classical Fallacies73
AppendixDefinition79
D1.When terms are unclear, get specific80
D2.When terms are contested, work from the clear cases82
D3.Don't expect definitions to do the work of arguments84
Next Steps86

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