Rules for the World: International Organizations in Global Politics / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$11.74
(Save 41%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $7.99
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 59%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (17) from $7.99   
  • New (9) from $14.55   
  • Used (8) from $7.99   

Overview

Rules for the World provides an innovative perspective on the behavior of international organizations and their effects on global politics. Arguing against the conventional wisdom that these bodies are little more than instruments of states, Michael Barnett and Martha Finnemore begin with the fundamental insight that international organizations are bureaucracies that have authority to make rules and so exercise power. At the same time, Barnett and Finnemore maintain, such bureaucracies can become obsessed with their own rules, producing unresponsive, inefficient, and self-defeating outcomes. Authority thus gives international organizations autonomy and allows them to evolve and expand in ways unintended by their creators.

Barnett and Finnemore reinterpret three areas of activity that have prompted extensive policy debate: the use of expertise by the IMF to expand its intrusion into national economies; the redefinition of the category "refugees" and decision to repatriate by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees; and the UN Secretariat's failure to recommend an intervention during the first weeks of the Rwandan genocide. By providing theoretical foundations for treating these organizations as autonomous actors in their own right, Rules for the World contributes greatly to our understanding of global politics and global governance.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"International organizations are a growing presence in the global system but remain a neglected subject of study. This book by two prominent political scientists provides a groundbreaking look at their impact, making clear that international organizations may be created by powerful states but, once established, are neither straightforward tools of states nor unalloyed servants of a global common good. . . . Barnett and Finnemore conclude that the impact of these organizations lies less in the expert knowledge they wield than in the ways they define problems, set agendas, and deploy 'intellectual technologies.' The most intriguing insights of the book, however, emerge as the authors grapple with what the growing 'global bureaucratization' means for democratic accountability."—G. John Ikenberry, Foreign Affairs, Nov./Dec. 2004

"The authors take a novel approach to studying international organizations and establish a framework wherein these actors have the potential to develop preferences and cultures that are counter to the wishes of their member states. The authors breathe new life into the study of IGOs by removing the rose-colored glasses of the extant literature, which cannot account for negative and independent behaviors of these organizations."—C. S. Leskiw, Choice, September 2005

"Few books about world politics merit the description of 'path-breaking.' Rules for the World is one of them. States matter, but so do their creations, international organizations. Realists beware."—Thomas G. Weiss, Presidential Professor and Director, Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies, The CUNY Graduate Center

"This is essential reading on the authoritative roles played by international secretariats. Michael Barnett and Martha Finnemore look at international organizations as organizations, applying a sophisticated bureaucratic analysis and identifying the modal pathologies of these unique institutions. They make a completely persuasive case that scholars need to pay more attention to the ways in which international organizations can be held accountable to their ultimate clients, not to their state members, but to citizens throughout the global polity."—Craig N. Murphy, Wellesley College, Historian of the UN Development Programme and Chair of the Academic Council on the UN System

"Provocative and controversial in the best senses of those words, Rules for the World urges us to rethink the widespread view that portrays international bureaucrats as selfless and powerless agents of states. The authors mix an insightful treatment of the sociology of organizations with in-depth and original case studies of three pathologies of global governance, instances when international organizations contributed to failures in the management of international financial crises, the protection of refugees, and the stopping of genocide."—Michael W. Doyle, Harold Brown Professor of Law and International Affairs, Columbia University

Foreign Affairs
International organizations are a growing presence in the global system but remain a neglected subject of study. This book by two prominent political scientists provides a groundbreaking look at their impact, making clear that international organizations may be created by powerful states but, once established, are neither straightforward tools of states nor unalloyed servants of a global common good. In order to account for what international organizations do, it is first necessary to understand what they are: sprawling bureaucracies with their own distinct interests, rules, culture, and logics of action. Detailed case studies of the International Monetary Fund, the office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, and the UN Secretariat illustrate the various ways that international organizations exercise authority. Barnett and Finnemore conclude that the impact of these organizations lies less in the expert knowledge they wield than in the ways they define problems, set agendas, and deploy "intellectual technologies." The most intriguing insights of the book, however, emerge as the authors grapple with what the growing "global bureaucratization" means for democratic accountability.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780801488238
  • Publisher: Cornell University Press
  • Publication date: 12/10/2004
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 937,310
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Michael Barnett is University Professor of International Affairs and Political Science at The George Washington University.

Martha Finnemore is University Professor of Political Science and International Affairs at The George Washington University.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

1. Bureaucratizing World Politics

2. International Organizations as Bureaucracies

3. Expertise and Power at the International Monetary Fund

4. Defining Refugees and Voluntary Repatriation at the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees

5. Genocide and the Peacekeeping Culture at the United Nations

6. The Legitimacy of an Expanding Global Bureaucracy

List of Abbreviations
Notes
Bibliography
Index

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)