The Rules of Management: A Definitive Code for Managerial Success

( 2 )

Overview

You’re smart, talented, competent, responsible.

So... they made you a manager.

And suddenly, all ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (53) from $1.99   
  • New (4) from $8.43   
  • Used (49) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$8.43
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(87)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
2005-06-26 Paperback New BRAND NEW COPY, Perfect Shape, No Black Remainder Mark,

Ships from: La Grange, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$8.43
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(87)

Condition: New
2005-06-26 Paperback New BRAND NEW COPY, Perfect Shape, No Black Remainder Mark,

Ships from: La Grange, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$45.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(113)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$45.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(113)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

You’re smart, talented, competent, responsible.

So... they made you a manager.

And suddenly, all that good stuff...just ain’t enough.

You need to know what the greatest managers know:

The Rules of Management.

Here they are. All 100 of ’em.

For managing teams. For managing you.

Read ’em. Learn ’em. Live ’em.

Next thing you know, you’ll be looking good.

Relaxed. Confident. Assertive.

In charge. In control.

You’ll be building, leading teams that do the impossible, follow you anywhere, and bring passion to work (yes, even at your company).

The Rules of Management: they’re not just rules.

They’re your blueprint for greatness...and shortcut to the executive suite.

Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780131870369
  • Publisher: FT Press
  • Publication date: 7/15/2005
  • Series: Richard Templar's Rules Series
  • Pages: 240
  • Product dimensions: 5.46 (w) x 10.88 (h) x 0.53 (d)

Meet the Author

Richard Templar 's recent best-selling business books include The Rules of Work and I Don't Want Any More Cheese, I Just Want Out of the Trap! He has spent many years in managerial roles in industries ranging from casinos to higher education, and he will be mentioned in Details magazine in a feature on career building.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

IntroductionIntroduction

Strange thing, management. It's something few of us set out in life to do, yet most of us find ourselves doing at some point.

Career adviser: What would you like to do when you finish school?

16-year-old: I want to be a manager.

Did this happen to you? No, me neither. But here you are anyway.

As a manager you are expected to be a lot of things. A tower of strength, a leader and innovator, a magician (conjuring up pay raises, resources, and extra staff at the drop of a hat), a kindly uncle/aunt, a shoulder to cry on, a dynamic motivator, a stern but fair judge, a diplomat, a politician, a financial wizard (no, this is quite different from being a magician), a protector, a savior and a saint.

You are responsible for a whole group of people who you probably didn't pick, may not like, might have nothing in common with, and who perhaps won't like you much. You have to coax out of them a decent day's work. You are also responsible for their physical, emotional, and mental safety and care. You have to make sure they don't hurt themselves—or each other. You have to ensure they can carry out their jobs according to whatever guidelines your industry warrants. You have to know your rights, their rights, the company's rights, the union's rights.

And on top of all this, you're expected to do your job as well.

Oh yes, and you have to remain cool and calm—you can't shout, throw things, or have favorites. This management business is a tall order....

You are responsible for looking after and getting the best out of a team. This team may behave at times like young children—and you can't smack them1 (or possibly even fire them). At other times they will behave like petulant teenagers—sleeping in late, not showing up, refusing to do any real work if they do show up, skipping out early—that sort of thing.

Like you, I've managed teams (in my case, up to a hundred people at a time). People whose names I was expected to know, and all their little foibles—ah, Heather can't work late on Tuesday because her daughter has to be picked up from play group. Trevor is colorblind, so we can't use him at the trade show. Mandy sulks if left to answer the phones at lunchtime and loses us customers. Chris is great in a team but can't motivate herself to do anything solo. Ray drinks and shouldn't be allowed to drive himself anywhere.

As a manager, you are also expected to be a buffer zone between higher management and your staff. Nonsense may come down from on high, but you have to a) sell it to your team, b) not groan loudly or laugh, and c) get your team to work with it even if it is nonsense.

You also have to justify the "no pay raises this year" mentality even if it has just completely demotivated your team. You will have to keep secret any knowledge you have of takeovers, mergers, acquisitions, secret deals, senior management buyouts, and the like, despite the fact that rumors are flying and you are being constantly asked questions by your team.

You are responsible not only for people but also for budgets, discipline, communications, efficiency, legal matters, union matters, health and safety matters, personnel matters, pensions, sick pay, maternity leave, paternity leave, holidays, time off, time out, time sheets, charity collections, schedules, industry standards, fire drills, first aid, fresh air, heating, plumbing, parking spaces, lighting, stationery, resources, and coffee. And that's not to mention the small matter of customers.

And you will have to fight with other departments, other teams, clients, senior bosses, senior management, the board, shareholders, and the accounting department (unless, of course, you are the manager of the accounting department).

You are also expected to set standards. This means you are going to have to be an on-time, up-front, smartly dressed, hard-working, industrious, late-staying, early-rising, detached, responsible, caring, knowledgeable, above-reproach juggler. Tall order.

You also need to accept that as a manager you may be ridiculed, derided as a manipulative obstructionist pen pusher and possibly even judged by your staff, shareholders, and/or the public to be ineffective and even superfluous to the carrying out of the actual job at hand.2

And all you wanted to do was your job...Luckily there are a few hints and tips that will have you sailing through it looking cool, earning points, and coming out smelling like roses. These are The Rules of Management—the unwritten, unspoken, unacknowledged Rules. Keep them to yourself if you want to stay one step ahead of the game.

Management is an art and a science. There are textbooks of thousands of pages devoted to how to do it. There are countless training courses. (You've probably been in a few.) However, what no textbook contains and no training course includes are the various "unwritten" rules that make you a good, effective, and decent manager. The Rules of Management. Whether you are responsible for only one or two people or thousands—it doesn't matter. The Rules are the same.

You won't find anything here you probably didn't already know. Or if you didn't know it, then you will read it and say, "But that's really obvious." Yes, it is all really obvious, if you think hard enough about it. But in the fast-paced, frantic, just-about-coping kind of life we lead, you may not have thought about it lately. And what isn't so obvious is whether or not you do it.

It's just fine to say "But I know that already." Yes, as a smart person you probably do, but ask yourself honestly for each rule: Do you put it into practice, carry it out, work with it as standard? Are you sure?

I've arranged these Rules for you into two sections:

  • Managing your team
  • Managing you

I think that should be fairly simple. The Rules aren't arranged in any particular order of importance—the first ones aren't more important than later ones or vice versa. Read them all and then start to put them into practice, adopting the ones that seem easiest to you first. A lot of them will flow together so that you can begin to carry them out simultaneously, unconsciously. Soon we'll have you looking cool and relaxed, confident and assertive, in charge, in control, on top of things, and managing marvelously. Not bad considering it wasn't too long ago you were shoulder to the wheel, nose to the grindstone, ear to the ground, and back to the wall. Well done, you.

Before we begin, it might be worth taking a moment or two to determine what exactly we all mean by "management." And that isn't as easy as it sounds. For my money we are all managers—parents,3 the self-employed, the entrepreneur, the employed, even the ones who inherited wealth. We all have to "manage." It might only be ourselves, but we still have to cope, to make the best use of resources available, motivate, plan, process, facilitate, monitor, measure success, set standards, budget, execute, and work. It's just that some of us have to do all that with bigger teams. But the fundamental stuff doesn't change.

The Harvard Business School defines a manager as someone who "gets results through other people." The great management consultant Peter Drucker says a manager is someone who has the responsibility to plan, execute, and monitor; while the Australian Institute of Management definition of a manager is a person who "plans, leads, organizes, delegates, controls, evaluates, and budgets in order to achieve an outcome." I can go along with that.

It can get very wordy and complex:

"A manager is an employee who forms part of the organization's management team and is accountable for exercising delegated authority over human, financial, and material management to accomplish the objectives of the organization. Managers are responsible for managing human resources, communicating, practicing and promoting the corporate values, ethics, and culture of the organization, and for leading and managing change within the organization." (The Leadership Network, California)

Fine, whatever. We are all managers in whatever form or shape we think and we all have to get to with the job of managing. Anything that makes our life simpler is a bonus. Here are the simple Rules of Management. They aren't devious or underhanded. Actually they are all pretty obvious. But if you think about each carefully and implement each without fail, you'll be amazed what a difference it will make to your work and your life.

You may know everything in this book, but do you do it? This book will help motivate you into doing what you already know.

Let's get started . . . .

1 Yes, yes, I know you can't smack children either. I was just making a point. Please don't write in.
2 If this all makes you feel a bit down about being a manager—don't be. Managers are the stuff that runs the world. We get to lead, to inspire, to motivate, to guide, to shape the future. We get to make a difference to the business and to people's lives. We get to make a real and positive contribution to the state of the world. We get, not only, to be part of the solution, but to provide the solution itself. We are the sheriff and the marshal and the ranger all rolled into one. We are the engine and the captain. It's a great role, and we should relish it—it's just not always an easy role.
3 If you don't believe parents have to be managers too, then read Ros Jay's Kids & Co: Winning Business Tactics for Every Family, White Ladder Press, 2003.

© Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction.

I. MANAGING YOUR TEAM.

1. Get Them Emotionally Involved

2. Know What a Team Is and How It Works

3. Set Realistic Targets-No, Really Realistic

4. Hold Effective Meetings-No, Really Effective

5. Make Meetings Fun

6. Make Your Team Better Than You

7. Set Your Boundaries

8. Be Ready to Cut

9. Offload as Much as You Can-or Dare

10. Let Them Make Mistakes

11. Accept Their Limitations

12. Encourage People

13. Be Very, Very Good at Finding the Right People

14. Take the Rap

15. Give Credit to the Team When It Deserves It

16. Get the Best Resources for Your Team

17. Celebrate

18. Keep Track of Everything You Do and Say

19. Be Sensitive to Friction

20. Create a Good Atmosphere

21. Inspire Loyalty and Team Spirit

22. Fight for Your Team

23. Have and Show Trust in Your Staff

24. Respect Individual Differences

25. Listen to Ideas from Others

26. Adapt Your Style to Each Team Member

27. Let Them Think They Know More Than You (Even If They Don't)

28. Don't Always Have to Have the Last Word

29. Understand the Roles of Others

30. Ensure People Know Exactly What Is Expected of Them

31. Use Positive Reinforcement to Motivate

32. Don't Try Justifying Stupid Systems

33. Be Ready to Say Yes

34. Train Them to Bring You Solutions, Not Problems

II. MANAGING YOURSELF.

35. Get It Done/Work Hard

36. Set an Example/Standards

37. Enjoy Yourself

38. Don't Let It Get to You

39. Know What You Are Supposed to Be Doing

40. Know What You Are Actually Doing

41. Be Proactive, Not Reactive

42. Be Consistent

43. Set Realistic Targets for Yourself-No, Really Realistic

44. Have a Game Plan, But Keep It Secret

45. Get Rid of Superfluous Rules

46. Learn From Your Mistakes

47. Be Ready to Unlearn-What Works, Changes

48. Cut the Crap-Prioritize

49. Cultivate Those in the Know

50. Know When to Shut the Door

51. Fill Your Time Productively and Profitably

52. Have a Plan B and a Plan C

53. Capitalize on Chance-Be Lucky, but Never Admit It

54. Recognize When You're Stressed

55. Manage Your Health

56. Be Prepared for the Pain and Pleasure

57. Face the Future

58. Head Up, Not Head Down

59. See the Woods and the Trees

60. Know When to Let Go

61. Be Decisive, Even If It Means Being Wrong Sometimes

62. Adopt Minimalism as a Management Style

63. Visualize Your Blue Plaque

64. Have Principles and Stick to Them

65. Follow Your Intuition/Gut Instinct

66. Be Creative

67. Don't Stagnate

68. Be Flexible and Ready to Move On

69. Remember the Object of the Exercise

70. Remember That None of Us Has to Be Here

71. Go Home

72. Keep Learning-Especially from the Opposition

73. Be Passionate and Bold

74. Plan for the Worst, but Hope for the Best

75. Let the Company See You Are on Its Side

76. Don't Bad-Mouth Your Boss

77. Don't Bad-Mouth Your Team

78. Accept That Some Things Bosses Tell You to Do Will Be Wrong

79. Accept That Bosses Are as Scared as You Are at Times

80. Avoid Straitjacket Thinking

81. Act and Talk as If You Are One of Them

82. Show You Understand the Viewpoint of Underlings and Overlings

83. Don't Back Down-Be Prepared to Stand Your Ground

84. Don't Play Politics

85. Don't Put Down Other Managers

86. Share What You Know

87. Don't Intimidate

88. Be Above Interdepartmental Warfare

89. Show That You'll Fight to the Death for Your Team

90. Aim for Respect Rather Than Being Liked

91. Do One or Two Things Well and Avoid the Rest

92. Seek Feedback on Your Performance

93. Maintain Good Relationships and Friendships

94. Build Respect-Both Ways-Between You and Your Customers

95. Go the Extra Mile for Your Customers

96. Be Aware of Your Responsibilities and Stick to Your Principles

97. Be Straight at All Times and Speak the Truth

98. Don't Cut Corners-You'll Get Caught

99. Be in Command and Take Charge

100. Be a Diplomat for the Company

End Game.

Acknowledgments.

Read More Show Less

Preface

Introduction

Strange thing, management. It's something few of us set out in life to do, yet most of us find ourselves doing at some point.

Career adviser: What would you like to do when you finish school?

16-year-old: I want to be a manager.

Did this happen to you? No, me neither. But here you are anyway.

As a manager you are expected to be a lot of things. A tower of strength, a leader and innovator, a magician (conjuring up pay raises, resources, and extra staff at the drop of a hat), a kindly uncle/aunt, a shoulder to cry on, a dynamic motivator, a stern but fair judge, a diplomat, a politician, a financial wizard (no, this is quite different from being a magician), a protector, a savior and a saint.

You are responsible for a whole group of people who you probably didn't pick, may not like, might have nothing in common with, and who perhaps won't like you much. You have to coax out of them a decent day's work. You are also responsible for their physical, emotional, and mental safety and care. You have to make sure they don't hurt themselves—or each other. You have to ensure they can carry out their jobs according to whatever guidelines your industry warrants. You have to know your rights, their rights, the company's rights, the union's rights.

And on top of all this, you're expected to do your job as well.

Oh yes, and you have to remain cool and calm—you can't shout, throw things, or have favorites. This management business is a tall order....

You are responsible for looking after and getting the best out of a team. This team may behave at times like young children—and you can't smack them1 (or possibly even fire them). At other times they will behave like petulant teenagers—sleeping in late, not showing up, refusing to do any real work if they do show up, skipping out early—that sort of thing.

Like you, I've managed teams (in my case, up to a hundred people at a time). People whose names I was expected to know, and all their little foibles—ah, Heather can't work late on Tuesday because her daughter has to be picked up from play group. Trevor is colorblind, so we can't use him at the trade show. Mandy sulks if left to answer the phones at lunchtime and loses us customers. Chris is great in a team but can't motivate herself to do anything solo. Ray drinks and shouldn't be allowed to drive himself anywhere.

As a manager, you are also expected to be a buffer zone between higher management and your staff. Nonsense may come down from on high, but you have to a) sell it to your team, b) not groan loudly or laugh, and c) get your team to work with it even if it is nonsense.

You also have to justify the "no pay raises this year" mentality even if it has just completely demotivated your team. You will have to keep secret any knowledge you have of takeovers, mergers, acquisitions, secret deals, senior management buyouts, and the like, despite the fact that rumors are flying and you are being constantly asked questions by your team.

You are responsible not only for people but also for budgets, discipline, communications, efficiency, legal matters, union matters, health and safety matters, personnel matters, pensions, sick pay, maternity leave, paternity leave, holidays, time off, time out, time sheets, charity collections, schedules, industry standards, fire drills, first aid, fresh air, heating, plumbing, parking spaces, lighting, stationery, resources, and coffee. And that's not to mention the small matter of customers.

And you will have to fight with other departments, other teams, clients, senior bosses, senior management, the board, shareholders, and the accounting department (unless, of course, you are the manager of the accounting department).

You are also expected to set standards. This means you are going to have to be an on-time, up-front, smartly dressed, hard-working, industrious, late-staying, early-rising, detached, responsible, caring, knowledgeable, above-reproach juggler. Tall order.

You also need to accept that as a manager you may be ridiculed, derided as a manipulative obstructionist pen pusher and possibly even judged by your staff, shareholders, and/or the public to be ineffective and even superfluous to the carrying out of the actual job at hand.2

And all you wanted to do was your job...Luckily there are a few hints and tips that will have you sailing through it looking cool, earning points, and coming out smelling like roses. These are The Rules of Management—the unwritten, unspoken, unacknowledged Rules. Keep them to yourself if you want to stay one step ahead of the game.

Management is an art and a science. There are textbooks of thousands of pages devoted to how to do it. There are countless training courses. (You've probably been in a few.) However, what no textbook contains and no training course includes are the various "unwritten" rules that make you a good, effective, and decent manager. The Rules of Management. Whether you are responsible for only one or two people or thousands—it doesn't matter. The Rules are the same.

You won't find anything here you probably didn't already know. Or if you didn't know it, then you will read it and say, "But that's really obvious." Yes, it is all really obvious, if you think hard enough about it. But in the fast-paced, frantic, just-about-coping kind of life we lead, you may not have thought about it lately. And what isn't so obvious is whether or not you do it.

It's just fine to say "But I know that already." Yes, as a smart person you probably do, but ask yourself honestly for each rule: Do you put it into practice, carry it out, work with it as standard? Are you sure?

I've arranged these Rules for you into two sections:

  • Managing your team
  • Managing you

I think that should be fairly simple. The Rules aren't arranged in any particular order of importance—the first ones aren't more important than later ones or vice versa. Read them all and then start to put them into practice, adopting the ones that seem easiest to you first. A lot of them will flow together so that you can begin to carry them out simultaneously, unconsciously. Soon we'll have you looking cool and relaxed, confident and assertive, in charge, in control, on top of things, and managing marvelously. Not bad considering it wasn't too long ago you were shoulder to the wheel, nose to the grindstone, ear to the ground, and back to the wall. Well done, you.

Before we begin, it might be worth taking a moment or two to determine what exactly we all mean by "management." And that isn't as easy as it sounds. For my money we are all managers—parents,3 the self-employed, the entrepreneur, the employed, even the ones who inherited wealth. We all have to "manage." It might only be ourselves, but we still have to cope, to make the best use of resources available, motivate, plan, process, facilitate, monitor, measure success, set standards, budget, execute, and work. It's just that some of us have to do all that with bigger teams. But the fundamental stuff doesn't change.

The Harvard Business School defines a manager as someone who "gets results through other people." The great management consultant Peter Drucker says a manager is someone who has the responsibility to plan, execute, and monitor; while the Australian Institute of Management definition of a manager is a person who "plans, leads, organizes, delegates, controls, evaluates, and budgets in order to achieve an outcome." I can go along with that.

It can get very wordy and complex:

"A manager is an employee who forms part of the organization's management team and is accountable for exercising delegated authority over human, financial, and material management to accomplish the objectives of the organization. Managers are responsible for managing human resources, communicating, practicing and promoting the corporate values, ethics, and culture of the organization, and for leading and managing change within the organization." (The Leadership Network, California)

Fine, whatever. We are all managers in whatever form or shape we think and we all have to get to with the job of managing. Anything that makes our life simpler is a bonus. Here are the simple Rules of Management. They aren't devious or underhanded. Actually they are all pretty obvious. But if you think about each carefully and implement each without fail, you'll be amazed what a difference it will make to your work and your life.

You may know everything in this book, but do you do it? This book will help motivate you into doing what you already know.

Let's get started . . . .


1 Yes, yes, I know you can't smack children either. I was just making a point. Please don't write in.
2 If this all makes you feel a bit down about being a manager—don't be. Managers are the stuff that runs the world. We get to lead, to inspire, to motivate, to guide, to shape the future. We get to make a difference to the business and to people's lives. We get to make a real and positive contribution to the state of the world. We get, not only, to be part of the solution, but to provide the solution itself. We are the sheriff and the marshal and the ranger all rolled into one. We are the engine and the captain. It's a great role, and we should relish it—it's just not always an easy role.
3 If you don't believe parents have to be managers too, then read Ros Jay's Kids & Co: Winning Business Tactics for Every Family, White Ladder Press, 2003.


© Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 18, 2006

    A slick list of rules for ruling at the office

    New or struggling managers will enjoy this practical, easy-to-read book of management tips, but experienced managers should take a look, too. Richard Templar writes in a 'straight-from-the-cuff' style (no dry textbook terminology or dusty case studies here). He packs his manual with great, even if a bit obvious, lists of advice. We recommend this breezy, practical rulebook. To be a better manager, read it and ask yourself if you are still following the best practices. If you know what to do, are you doing it? If you don¿t know what to do, start reading.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)