The Rules of Work: The Unspoken Truth About Getting Ahead in Business

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For some people, work's a breeze: they glide effortlessly through all the office politics and back stabbing, always saying and doing the right thing, getting raises, getting promotions, getting results. What do they know that everyone else doesn't? The rules of work. Those rules are surprisingly easy to learn -- and once you know them, they're equally easy to live by. Now, Richard Templar's brought them all together in one place: the quick, irreverent The Rules of Work: A Definitive Guide to Personal Success. ...
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Overview

For some people, work's a breeze: they glide effortlessly through all the office politics and back stabbing, always saying and doing the right thing, getting raises, getting promotions, getting results. What do they know that everyone else doesn't? The rules of work. Those rules are surprisingly easy to learn -- and once you know them, they're equally easy to live by. Now, Richard Templar's brought them all together in one place: the quick, irreverent The Rules of Work: A Definitive Guide to Personal Success. Templar doesn't just show you how to LOOK more effective: he shows you how to BE more effective in today's workplace environments. Discover how to get ahead without compromising your principles; how to project the air of confidence and energy that wins respect; how to carve out a powerful niche for yourself; how to handle conflict without alienating the warriors; how to read your corporate culture; when to speak and when to remain silent; when to stay late and when to leave early; and how to capitalize on the key moments that can supercharge your career.
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Editorial Reviews

Soundview Executive Book Summaries
Richard Templar moved up the corporate ladder by studying the winning habits of those above him, and has turned those behaviors into The Rules of Work. These 100 rules for the workplace offer employees and managers practical lessons in upward mobility, including "Cultivate Friendship and Approval of Your Colleagues," "Stand Your Ground," and "Write Well." Using personal stories and experienced guidance, Templar explains how being assertive, polished, honest, cautious and conscientious can pay off at work. Copyright © 2006 Soundview Executive Book Summaries
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780131858381
  • Publisher: FT Press
  • Publication date: 1/26/2005
  • Series: Richard Templar's Rules Series
  • Pages: 240
  • Product dimensions: 5.91 (w) x 8.91 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Richard Templar's recent best-selling business books include I Don't Want Any More Cheese, I Just Want Out of the Trap! He is also author of Free Agency; Fast Thinking Finding Facts; and the forthcoming Rules of Management: The Definitive Guide to Managerial Success. He has spent many years in managerial roles in industries ranging from casinos to higher education.

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Read an Excerpt

IntroductionIntroduction

I first started formulating The Rules of Work many, many years ago when I was an assistant manager. There was a promotion going for the next step up—manager. There were two possible candidates, myself and Rob. On paper I had more experience, more expertise, most of the staff wanted me as their manager and I generally knew the new job better. Rob, to be honest, was useless.

I was chatting with an outside consultant the company used and asked him what he thought my chances were. "Slim," he replied. I was indignant. I explained all about my experience, my expertise, my superior abilities. "Yep," he replied, "but you don't walk like a manager." "And Rob does?" "Yep, that's about the strength of it." Needless to say he was quite right and Rob got the job. I had to work under a moron. But a moron who walked right. I studied that walk very carefully.

The consultant was spot on, there was a manager's walk. I began to notice that every employee, every job, everyone in fact, had their walk. Receptionists walked in a particular way as did the cashiers, the catering staff, the office workers, the admin, the security staff—and the managers of course. Secretly, I began to practice the walk. Looking the Part

As I spent a lot of time watching the walk I realized that there was also a manager's style of attire, of speaking, of behavior. It wasn't enough that I was good at my job and had the experience. I had to look as if I was better than anyone else. It wasn't just a walk—it was an entire makeover. And gradually, as I watched, I noticed that what newspaperwas read was important, as was what pen was used, how you wrote, how you talked to colleagues, what you said at meetings—everything, in fact, was being judged, evaluated, acted upon. It wasn't enough to be able to do the job. If you wanted to get on you had to be seen to be the Right Type. The Rules of Work is about creating that type—of course, you've got to be able to do the job in the first place. But a lot of people can do that. What makes you stand out? What makes you a suitable candidate for promotion? What makes the difference?Act One Step Ahead

I noticed that among the managers there were some who had mastered the walk, but there were others who were practicing, unconsciously, for the next walk—the general manager's walk.

I happened at that time to be traveling around a lot between different branches and noticed that among the general managers there were some who were going to stay right where they were for a long time. But there were others already practicing for their next step ahead—the regional director's walk. And style and image.

I switched from practicing the manager's walk and leaped ahead to the general manager's walk. Three months later I was promoted from assistant manager to general manager in one swift move. I was now the moron's manager.Walk Your Talk

Rob had the walk (Rule 15: Develop a Style That Gets You Noticed), but unfortunately he didn't adhere sufficiently to the rules in Part 1—he didn't know the job well enough. He looked right, sounded right, but the bottom line was—he couldn't do the job as well as he should have. I was brought in over his head because they couldn't fire him—having just promoted him it would have looked bad—and they needed someone to oversee his work so that his mistakes could be rectified quickly. Rob had reached the level of his own incompetence and stayed there for several years neither improving nor particularly getting worse—just looking good and walking right. He eventually shuffled himself off sideways into running his own business—a restaurant. This failed shortly afterward because he forgot Rule 2: Never Stand Still —or maybe he never actually knew it. He carried on walking like a manager instead of a restaurateur. His customers never really took to him.

By practicing the general manager's walk I got the promotion, but I also got it because I paid great attention to doing my job well. Once in this new job I was, of course, completely out of my depth. I had to quickly learn not only my new role and all its responsibilities, but also the position below, which I had not really held. I had stood in for managers but I had never been a manager—now I was the manager's manager. I was in great danger of falling flat on my face. Never Let Anyone Know How Hard You Work

But I was, by now, a dedicated Rules player. There was only one recourse – secret learning. I spent every spare second available – evenings, weekends, lunch breaks—studying everything I could that would help me. But I told no one—Rule 10.

Within a short time I had mastered enough to be able to do the job well enough. And the embryonic Rules of Work were born.Have a Plan

Being a general manager was both fun and painful. It was 50 per cent more work but only 20 per cent more pay. My next step, logically, was regional director. But it didn't appeal. More work, much more work but for not that much more money. I began to study the rules in Part 3. Where did I want to go next? What did I want to do? I was getting bored being stuck in the office all the time and all those endless dreary meetings. And all that time spent at head office. Not for me. I wanted to have fun again. I wanted to practice the Rules. I formulated my plan.

What the company didn't have was a roving troubleshooter—a sort of general manager's general manager. I put Rule 4: Carve Out a Niche for Yourself into play. I suggested to the chairman that a report was needed. I never suggested that this was the job I wanted, but the agenda was obvious I suppose. I got it, of course, and became a peripatetic general manager, answerable directly only to the chairman and with a job description I wrote myself. And pay? A lot more than the regional directors were on but I practiced the rules in Part 5: Look After Yourself. They didn't know and I didn't let on. But I cultivated their support and friendship. I was never a threat because it was obvious I wasn't after their job. They may have wanted the money I made if they had known, but they didn't want the little niche I had carved out for myself.

And I did this without being ruthless, dishonest or unpleasant. In fact I was always diplomatic when dealing with the general managers. I treated them with courtesy and politeness, even when I had to correct them on some aspect of their job. I added the rules in Part 4 and Part 8.Knowing the People Who Count

And I quickly learned that if I wanted to know what was going on in a branch, it was best to speak to the people who really knew—the cleaners, the receptionists, the cashiers, and the drivers. It was important both to identify these people and to be on the right side of them—Rule 86. They supplied me with more information than anyone would have believed—and all for the price of a simple "Hello Bob, how's your daughter doing at university these days?"

The Rules of Work took shape. Over the next few years I watched them grow up, gain maturity and experience. I left the corporation and founded my own consultancy. I trained managers in The Rules of Work and watched them go out into the world and conquer their destiny with charm and courtesy, confidence, and authority.

But I see you have questions. How do these rules work—are they manipulative? No, you don't make anyone else do anything, it is you that is changing and improving.

  • Do I have to become someone else? No, you may need to change your behavior a bit, but not your personality or values, you'll go on being you, but a slicker, quicker you, a more successful you.

  • Are they hard to learn? No, you can learn them in a week or two—but it does take a long time to really master them. But we are learning all the time and even practicing one rule is better than none at all.

  • Is it easy to spot others doing them? Yes, sometimes, but the really good Rules Player will never let you see what they are doing, they're too good for that. But once you become a Rules Player too it does become easier to see what rule people are using at any particular time.

  • Will I notice benefits right away? Oh yes, you betcha, immediately.

  • Do I still do them? I wouldn't even admit to doing them in the first place—I'm a Rules Player after all.

  • Is it ethical to use the Rules? Yes. You aren't doing anything wrong, merely utilizing your own natural skills and talents and adapting them, using them consciously. This is a key area for understanding the Rules—consciously. Everything you do will have been decided beforehand—you'll still appear spontaneous of course, you decided that as well—but you will be a conscious manipulator of any situation rather than an unconscious victim. You will be awake and aware, living in the moment, and taking advantage of your own abilities. The bottom line is that you must be able to do your job—and do it well in the first place. The Rules are not for boasters or posers or bullshitters or charlatans or coasters. You think you work hard now? It's nothing to doing the Rules successfully—now that really does take work.

And let's face it, you love to work. You love doing your job. You have to be, to be wanting to read the Rules and to want to be moving onward and upward. What I am suggesting is that you consciously think about every area of that work and make changes to improve:

  • The way you do it

  • How people perceive you to be doing it

If you don't practice the Rules you will muddle along, get by, maybe find what it is you are looking for. You may already know a lot of these Rules—and be practicing them—instinctively and intuitively. Now we will do them consciously. If you do you will:

  • Get promoted

  • Get along better with your colleagues

  • Feel better about yourself

  • Enjoy your work more

  • Understand your job better

  • Understand your boss's point of view better

  • Take more pride in both yourself and your work

  • Set a good example for junior staff

  • Contribute more to your company

  • Be valued and respected

  • Spread an aura of goodwill and cooperation around you

  • Be successful if you leave to start your own business

These Rules are simple and effective, safe, and practical. They are your 100 steps to building confidence and creating a new and more powerful you. And building that new you morally and ethically. You aren't going to do anything that you wouldn't expect—and appreciate—others doing to you. These Rules enhance personal standards and elevate your individual principles. They are my gift to you. They're yours. Keep them safe, keep them secret.

© Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments.

Introduction.

I. WALK YOUR TALK.

1. Get Your Work Noticed.

2. Never Stand Still.

3. Volunteer Carefully.

4. Carve Out a Niche for Yourself.

5. Underpromise and Overdeliver.

6. Know Something Others Don’t.

7. Be 100 Percent Committed.

8. Enjoy What You Are Doing.

9. Develop the Right Attitude.

10. Never Let Anyone Know How Hard You Work.

II. KNOW THAT YOU’RE BEING JUDGED AT ALL TIMES.

11. Dress Well.

12. Cultivate a Smile.

13. No Limp Fish–Develop the Perfect Handshake.

14. Exude Confidence and Energy.

15. Develop a Style That Gets You Noticed.

16. Pay Attention to Personal Grooming.

17. Be Attractive.

18. Be Cool.

19. Speak Well.

20. Write Well.

III. HAVE A PLAN.

21. Know What You Want Long Term.

22. Know What You Want Short Term.

23. Study the Promotion System.

24. Develop a Game Plan.

25. Set Objectives.

26. Know Your Role.

27. Know Yourself–Strengths and Weaknesses.

28. Identify Key Times and Events.

29. Anticipate Threats.

30. Look for Opportunities.

IV. IF YOU CAN’T SAY ANYTHING NICE–SHUT UP.

31. Don’t Gossip.

32. Don’t Bitch.

33. Stand Up for Others.

34. Compliment People Sincerely.

35. Be Cheerful and Positive.

36. Ask Questions.

37. Use “Please” and “Thank You”.

38. Don’t Curse.

39. Be a Good Listener.

40. Only Speak Sense.

V. LOOK AFTER YOURSELF.

41. Know the Ethics of Your Industry.

42. Know the Legalities of Your Industry.

43. Set Personal Standards.

44. Never Lie.

45. Never Cover Up for Anyone Else.

46. Keep Records.

47. Know the Difference Between the Truth and the Whole Truth.

48. Cultivate Your Support/Contacts/Friends.

49. Understand Others’ Motives.

50. Assume Everyone Else Is Playing by Different Rules.

VI. BLEND IN.

51. Know the Corporate Culture.

52. Speak the Language.

53. Dress Up or Down Accordingly.

54. Be Adaptable in Your Dealings with Different People.

55. Know Where to Hang Out, and When.

56. Understand the Social Protocols.

57. Know the Rules About Authority.

58. Know the Rules About the Office Hierarchy.

59. Never Disapprove of Others.

60. Understand the Herd Mentality.

VII. ACT ONE STEP AHEAD.

61. Dress One Step Ahead.

62. Talk One Step Ahead.

63. Act One Step Ahead.

64. Think One Step Ahead.

65. Address Corporate Issues and Problems.

66. Talk of “We” Rather Than “I”.

67. Walk the Walk.

68. Spend More Time with Senior Staff.

69. Get People to Assume You Have Already Made the Step.

70. Prepare for the Step After Next.

VIII. CULTIVATE DIPLOMACY.

71. Ask Questions in Times of Conflict.

72. Don’t Take Sides.

73. Know When to Keep Your Opinions to Yourself.

74. Be Conciliatory.

75. Never Lose Your Temper.

76. Never Get Personal.

77. Know How to Handle Other People’s Anger.

78. Stand Your Ground.

79. Be Objective About the Situation.

80. Put Things in Perspective.

IX. KNOW THE SYSTEM–AND MILK IT.

81. Know All the Unspoken Rules of Office Life.

82. Know What to Call Everyone.

83. Know When to Stay Late and When to Go Early.

84. Know the Theft or Perks Rule.

85. Identify the People Who Count.

86. Be on the Right Side of the People Who Count.

87. Be Well Up on New Management Techniques.

88. Know the Undercurrents and Hidden Agendas.

89. Know the Favorites and Cultivate Them.

90. Know the Mission Statement–and Understand It.

X. HANDLE THE OPPOSITION.

91. Identify the Opposition.

92. Study Them Closely.

93. Don’t Backstab.

94. Know the Psychology of Promotion.

95. Don’t Give Too Much Away.

96. Keep Your Ear to the Ground.

97. Make the Opposition Seem Irreplaceable.

98. Don’t Damn the Opposition with Faint Praise.

99. Capitalize on the Career-Enhancing Moments.

100. Cultivate the Friendship and Approval of Your Colleagues.

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Preface

Introduction

I first started formulating The Rules of Work many, many years ago when I was an assistant manager. There was a promotion going for the next step up—manager. There were two possible candidates, myself and Rob. On paper I had more experience, more expertise, most of the staff wanted me as their manager and I generally knew the new job better. Rob, to be honest, was useless.

I was chatting with an outside consultant the company used and asked him what he thought my chances were. "Slim," he replied. I was indignant. I explained all about my experience, my expertise, my superior abilities. "Yep," he replied, "but you don't walk like a manager." "And Rob does?" "Yep, that's about the strength of it." Needless to say he was quite right and Rob got the job. I had to work under a moron. But a moron who walked right. I studied that walk very carefully.

The consultant was spot on, there was a manager's walk. I began to notice that every employee, every job, everyone in fact, had their walk. Receptionists walked in a particular way as did the cashiers, the catering staff, the office workers, the admin, the security staff—and the managers of course. Secretly, I began to practice the walk.

Looking the Part

As I spent a lot of time watching the walk I realized that there was also a manager's style of attire, of speaking, of behavior. It wasn't enough that I was good at my job and had the experience. I had to look as if I was better than anyone else. It wasn't just a walk—it was an entire makeover. And gradually, as I watched, I noticed that what newspaper was read was important, as was what pen was used, how you wrote, how you talked to colleagues, what you said at meetings—everything, in fact, was being judged, evaluated, acted upon. It wasn't enough to be able to do the job. If you wanted to get on you had to be seen to be the Right Type. The Rules of Work is about creating that type—of course, you've got to be able to do the job in the first place. But a lot of people can do that. What makes you stand out? What makes you a suitable candidate for promotion? What makes the difference?

Act One Step Ahead

I noticed that among the managers there were some who had mastered the walk, but there were others who were practicing, unconsciously, for the next walk—the general manager's walk.

I happened at that time to be traveling around a lot between different branches and noticed that among the general managers there were some who were going to stay right where they were for a long time. But there were others already practicing for their next step ahead—the regional director's walk. And style and image.

I switched from practicing the manager's walk and leaped ahead to the general manager's walk. Three months later I was promoted from assistant manager to general manager in one swift move. I was now the moron's manager.

Walk Your Talk

Rob had the walk (Rule 15: Develop a Style That Gets You Noticed), but unfortunately he didn't adhere sufficiently to the rules in Part 1—he didn't know the job well enough. He looked right, sounded right, but the bottom line was—he couldn't do the job as well as he should have. I was brought in over his head because they couldn't fire him—having just promoted him it would have looked bad—and they needed someone to oversee his work so that his mistakes could be rectified quickly. Rob had reached the level of his own incompetence and stayed there for several years neither improving nor particularly getting worse—just looking good and walking right. He eventually shuffled himself off sideways into running his own business—a restaurant. This failed shortly afterward because he forgot Rule 2: Never Stand Still —or maybe he never actually knew it. He carried on walking like a manager instead of a restaurateur. His customers never really took to him.

By practicing the general manager's walk I got the promotion, but I also got it because I paid great attention to doing my job well. Once in this new job I was, of course, completely out of my depth. I had to quickly learn not only my new role and all its responsibilities, but also the position below, which I had not really held. I had stood in for managers but I had never been a manager—now I was the manager's manager. I was in great danger of falling flat on my face.

Never Let Anyone Know How Hard You Work

But I was, by now, a dedicated Rules player. There was only one recourse – secret learning. I spent every spare second available – evenings, weekends, lunch breaks—studying everything I could that would help me. But I told no one—Rule 10.

Within a short time I had mastered enough to be able to do the job well enough. And the embryonic Rules of Work were born.

Have a Plan

Being a general manager was both fun and painful. It was 50 per cent more work but only 20 per cent more pay. My next step, logically, was regional director. But it didn't appeal. More work, much more work but for not that much more money. I began to study the rules in Part 3. Where did I want to go next? What did I want to do? I was getting bored being stuck in the office all the time and all those endless dreary meetings. And all that time spent at head office. Not for me. I wanted to have fun again. I wanted to practice the Rules. I formulated my plan.

What the company didn't have was a roving troubleshooter—a sort of general manager's general manager. I put Rule 4: Carve Out a Niche for Yourself into play. I suggested to the chairman that a report was needed. I never suggested that this was the job I wanted, but the agenda was obvious I suppose. I got it, of course, and became a peripatetic general manager, answerable directly only to the chairman and with a job description I wrote myself. And pay? A lot more than the regional directors were on but I practiced the rules in Part 5: Look After Yourself. They didn't know and I didn't let on. But I cultivated their support and friendship. I was never a threat because it was obvious I wasn't after their job. They may have wanted the money I made if they had known, but they didn't want the little niche I had carved out for myself.

And I did this without being ruthless, dishonest or unpleasant. In fact I was always diplomatic when dealing with the general managers. I treated them with courtesy and politeness, even when I had to correct them on some aspect of their job. I added the rules in Part 4 and Part 8.

Knowing the People Who Count

And I quickly learned that if I wanted to know what was going on in a branch, it was best to speak to the people who really knew—the cleaners, the receptionists, the cashiers, and the drivers. It was important both to identify these people and to be on the right side of them—Rule 86. They supplied me with more information than anyone would have believed—and all for the price of a simple "Hello Bob, how's your daughter doing at university these days?"

The Rules of Work took shape. Over the next few years I watched them grow up, gain maturity and experience. I left the corporation and founded my own consultancy. I trained managers in The Rules of Work and watched them go out into the world and conquer their destiny with charm and courtesy, confidence, and authority.

But I see you have questions. How do these rules work—are they manipulative? No, you don't make anyone else do anything, it is you that is changing and improving.

  • Do I have to become someone else? No, you may need to change your behavior a bit, but not your personality or values, you'll go on being you, but a slicker, quicker you, a more successful you.
  • Are they hard to learn? No, you can learn them in a week or two—but it does take a long time to really master them. But we are learning all the time and even practicing one rule is better than none at all.
  • Is it easy to spot others doing them? Yes, sometimes, but the really good Rules Player will never let you see what they are doing, they're too good for that. But once you become a Rules Player too it does become easier to see what rule people are using at any particular time.
  • Will I notice benefits right away? Oh yes, you betcha, immediately.
  • Do I still do them? I wouldn't even admit to doing them in the first place—I'm a Rules Player after all.
  • Is it ethical to use the Rules? Yes. You aren't doing anything wrong, merely utilizing your own natural skills and talents and adapting them, using them consciously. This is a key area for understanding the Rules—consciously. Everything you do will have been decided beforehand—you'll still appear spontaneous of course, you decided that as well—but you will be a conscious manipulator of any situation rather than an unconscious victim. You will be awake and aware, living in the moment, and taking advantage of your own abilities. The bottom line is that you must be able to do your job—and do it well in the first place. The Rules are not for boasters or posers or bullshitters or charlatans or coasters. You think you work hard now? It's nothing to doing the Rules successfully—now that really does take work.

And let's face it, you love to work. You love doing your job. You have to be, to be wanting to read the Rules and to want to be moving onward and upward. What I am suggesting is that you consciously think about every area of that work and make changes to improve:

  • The way you do it
  • How people perceive you to be doing it

If you don't practice the Rules you will muddle along, get by, maybe find what it is you are looking for. You may already know a lot of these Rules—and be practicing them—instinctively and intuitively. Now we will do them consciously. If you do you will:

  • Get promoted
  • Get along better with your colleagues
  • Feel better about yourself
  • Enjoy your work more
  • Understand your job better
  • Understand your boss's point of view better
  • Take more pride in both yourself and your work
  • Set a good example for junior staff
  • Contribute more to your company
  • Be valued and respected
  • Spread an aura of goodwill and cooperation around you
  • Be successful if you leave to start your own business

These Rules are simple and effective, safe, and practical. They are your 100 steps to building confidence and creating a new and more powerful you. And building that new you morally and ethically. You aren't going to do anything that you wouldn't expect—and appreciate—others doing to you. These Rules enhance personal standards and elevate your individual principles. They are my gift to you. They're yours. Keep them safe, keep them secret.

© Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

Read More Show Less

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2006

    Don't judge a book by its ... author

    If editors don¿t know a subject, don't they have people around who do? They need to, for the sake of readers, authors and themselves. It'd avoid looking silly to informed readers. I've worked in companies for years but haven't had to climb ladders, so I see the Rules book from an unusual perspective. As a book about business it's Grade B. The problem looks like incomplete editing, which undermines the book's credibility. First, don't give someone in management 100 of anything. It says the task is unfinished. Do the work, and start with the 11 (or whatever) that really matter. The usual 80-20 rule and ABC prioritization apply. Second, tidy up the duplications and contradictions an author may be too close to see. Share what you know but keep your grand plan secret is just one example. Third, check language for place and time. Rules is a wrong word in the US, and confusing. For some 15 years, Theory X (authoritative, command and control) has been challenged by Theory Y (participation, delegation). Theory Y has principles replacing rules, tying in with Total Quality Management¿s essential tenet: drive out fear. People believe the written word. This is a huge responsibility for authors and intermediaries (editors, copy writers, reviewers). An author takes enormous trouble to get it right. Why don¿t intermediaries aim high, too, instead settling (good-enough-is-good-enough)? As Richard Templar says, Go the extra mile for your customers. Yes. I've had super editors, so my beef is against Grade B-ness and implied disdain for readers -- customers. The disdain is probably unintentional, but is counterproductive from a business point of view. For example, 'Pearson Education' is the company¿s viewpoint (push), looking out and down on readers as if an old-school teacher. To readers of all ages, the company is a source of learning (pull) and 'Pearson Learning' is much more appealing.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 14, 2005

    Insightful!

    Shortly after author Richard Templar started his career, a boss whom he despised relegated him to the menial job of taking the CEO his morning coffee. Templar used this assignment as an opportunity to chat with the CEO for five minutes each day. One day Templar recommended that the CEO assign his unpopular boss elsewhere in the company. Soon the hated boss was gone, and Templar had learned his first lesson about taking advantage of the unwritten rules of the office. Books like this tend to come across as reiterations of Machiavelli's 'The Prince', promoting stratagems that work only if you're willing to behave like a conniving finalist on 'Survivor'. Yet, this book is actually useable and it has an interesting twist: Templar says it's only for those who are willing to work harder than everyone else. He writes, 'These rules are not for...posers. They are for the really industrious, the talented, the hardworking, the naturally gifted, those who are prepared to put in some effort and burn some oil.' Templar's rules range from obvious to delightfully devious. He upholds ethical boundaries, however, and he's secure enough to lampoon himself to make a point. We recommend this fun, useful compendium to anyone who could use an official rulebook, spiced up with a little attitude, for the game of office politics.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2005

    Very recognizable but with added value

    Some of the rules in this book reminded me of my own findings, and some reminded me of things I suspected but now know to be more true than I suspected. This book definitely gets you ahead in work as long as you live by the rules of course...

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 10, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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