Rumble Thumble Boom!

Rumble Thumble Boom!

by Anna Grossnickle Hines
     
 

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"Don't worry Herc," the small boy tells his dog. "It's just thunder. It's just the air bumping into itself." He's repeating his father's words of comfort, but the bumping air gets louder and louder and, brave as boy and dog are, the heartening words are not enough. Luckily, like so many children before him, the boy knows the perfect solution and all the family safely… See more details below

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Overview

"Don't worry Herc," the small boy tells his dog. "It's just thunder. It's just the air bumping into itself." He's repeating his father's words of comfort, but the bumping air gets louder and louder and, brave as boy and dog are, the heartening words are not enough. Luckily, like so many children before him, the boy knows the perfect solution and all the family safely and contently weather the storm.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Set against inky black pages, Hines's beguiling tale resonates with the charged atmosphere of a thunderstorm. Even though a frightened lad recalls that ``Grandpa says it's all the people in heaven playing ninepins,'' the youngster and his dog come down with chronic insomnia as the thunder crashes outside. Indeed, deep-toned onomatopoetic words tumble across these pages above white text--``Rumble grumble''; ``Crackety Boom!''; ``Doom-ka-Bloomm!!'' After amusing familial negotatiation, a cozy foursome beds down together; pooch and boy find solace at last, but now Mommy and Daddy have second thoughts. Written in the first person, this upbeat story endearingly expresses a youngster's fears and wiles, as the narrator transfers his trepidation to Hercules: `` `It's me and Hercules,' I say. `He's afraid of the thunder.' '' Hines's darkly realistic, colored-pencil illustrations, highlighted with rich reds and purples, evoke the storm's menace while retaining a cozy indoors mood. Children may well recognize themselves in this towheaded scamp, and might just overcome a few fears of their own while rolling these rumbling noises trippingly off their tongues. Ages 3-up. (Aug.)
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-- During a storm, a young boy and his dog, Hercules, are afraid of the thunder, and none of the explanations of the loud noises given in the past by various family members are of any comfort. After trying unsuccessfully to escape the rumblings by hiding under the bed, they run to the boy's parents, who agree to take them into their bed--if Hercules stays on top of the sheets. The boy insists that his pet is still anxious, so the four of them move to the old sofa bed, are tucked into old sheets and, finally, are all cozy. While Hines's dark illustrations done in colored pencil on black paper are quite different from much of her previous work, the muted tones of the artwork reinforce the story's mood and setting. Also, the artwork, which combines elements of realism and impressionism, incorporates the sounds of thunder in large colored letters above the text as a part of the illustration. These colorful effects enhance the book's use for storytelling either with a group or with a single child. With its gentle humor and comforting text, Rumble Thumble Boom! addresses a common fear, and is a good addition to picture-book collections. --Andrew W. Hunter, Pub . Lib . of Charlotte and Mecklenburg, Charlotte, NC
Hazel Rochman
In a reassuring story, a boy copes with his fear of thunder. It's nighttime and dramatic. The text pages are black with white type, and big flowing words in colored pencil imitate the sounds of the storm (crack bam boom!). Opposite are full-page framed pictures of the boy and his dog awake in bed. Scared. As the lightning flashes white at the window, his sleepy parents try to settle him. Daddy explains the physics--the lightning heats up the air, so it moves around too fast and bumps into itself--but it's still "loud." Eventually, the boy, the dog, and the weary parents are all in the sofa bed together. Now he can feel relaxed: "It's just the air bumping into itself." This is one of those read-alouds that will evoke smiles of wry recognition in adults without condescending to kids.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780688109110
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
08/01/1992
Edition description:
1st ed
Pages:
24
Age Range:
4 - 9 Years

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